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Nana
Theatrical release poster
Directed byDorothy Arzner
George Fitzmaurice
Produced bySamuel Goldwyn
StarringAnna Sten
Lionel Atwill
Richard Bennett
Mae Clarke
CinematographyGregg Toland
Edited byFrank Lawrence
Production
company
Distributed byUnited Artists
Release date
  • February 1, 1934 (1934-02-01) (US)
Running time
90 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Nana is a 1934 American pre-Code film, produced by Samuel Goldwyn, released through United Artists, starring Anna Sten. and directed by Dorothy Arzner and George Fitzmaurice.

This version of Émile Zola's 1880 novel and heroine was to be the vehicle for Sten's triumph as Samuel Goldwyn's trained, groomed and heavily promoted answer to Greta Garbo. Despite a record-breaking opening week at Radio City Music Hall, Sten was beautiful but disappointing.

Goldwyn's tutoring of Sten is mentioned in Cole Porter's 1934 song "Anything Goes" from the musical of the same name: "If Sam Goldwyn can with great conviction / Instruct Anna Sten in diction / Then Anna shows / Anything goes."

Plot

A Parisian streetwalker is discovered by a theatrical impresario and becomes a stage success. At her height of popularity, she falls in love with a soldier, and draws both ire and fascination from his protective older brother.

Cast

Reception

The film was a box office disappointment.[1][2]

References

  1. ^ Churchill, Douglas W. The Year in Hollywood: 1934 May Be Remembered as the Beginning of the Sweetness-and-Light Era (gate locked); New York Times 30 December 1934: X5. Retrieved December 16, 2013.
  2. ^ D. W. (Nov 25, 1934). "TAKING A LOOK AT THE RECORD". New York Times. ProQuest 101193306.