Nederlander Theatre
National Theatre, Billy Rose Theatre, Trafalgar Theatre
Nederlander Theatre - Pretty Woman (48295956906).jpg
With Pretty Woman on the facade
Address208 West 41st Street
New York City
United States
Coordinates40°45′20″N 73°59′18″W / 40.75556°N 73.98833°W / 40.75556; -73.98833Coordinates: 40°45′20″N 73°59′18″W / 40.75556°N 73.98833°W / 40.75556; -73.98833
OwnerNederlander Organization
TypeBroadway
Capacity1,232[a]
ProductionA Christmas Carol
Construction
Opened1921
ArchitectWilliam Neil Smith
Website
broadwaydirect.com/venue/nederlander-theatre/

The Nederlander Theatre (formerly the National Theatre, the Billy Rose Theatre, and the Trafalgar Theatre) is a Broadway theater at 208 West 41st Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1921, it was designed by William Neil Smith for theatrical operator Walter C. Jordan. It has around 1,235 seats[a] across two levels and is operated by the Nederlander Organization. Since 1980, it has been named for American theater impresario David Tobias Nederlander, father of theatrical producer James M. Nederlander. It is the southernmost Broadway theater in the Theater District.

The facade is relatively plain and is made of brick, with a fire escape at the center of the second and third floors. The auditorium was originally designed in the early Renaissance style, which has since been modified several times. Unlike other theaters operated by the Shubert family, the interior contained little plaster decoration. The venue has hosted a variety of shows, including the plays Cyrano de Bergerac, Inherit the Wind, and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?; live performances, including those by Lena Horne; and the musical Rent, which is the theater's longest-running production as of 2022.

The modern-day Nederlander Theatre was developed as a carpenter's shop in 1920 before being converted into the National Theatre the following year. When the National opened on September 1, 1921, the Shubert family managed bookings on Jordan's behalf. The Shubert brothers bought the National in 1927 and operated it for three decades. In 1956, as part of a settlement in an antitrust lawsuit, the Shuberts sold the venue to Harry Fromkes, who died shortly thereafter. The National was acquired in 1958 by theatrical producer Billy Rose, who renovated the venue and renamed it after himself the next year. The Nederlander Organization and the Cooney-Marsh Organization acquired the theater in 1978, first renaming it the Trafalgar Theatre; the theater assumed its current name in 1980. Because there were few other Broadway theaters nearby, the Nederlander housed few productions in the late 20th century, becoming popular only after Rent opened.

Site

The Nederlander Theatre is on 208 West 41st Street, between Seventh Avenue and Eighth Avenue near the southern end of Times Square, in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City.[1][2] The rectangular land lot covers 10,961 square feet (1,018.3 m2), with a frontage of 111 feet (34 m) on 41st Street and a depth of 98.75 feet (30 m).[1] The Nederlander Theatre abuts a hotel and a parking garage, both of which have existed since before the theater was completed in 1921.[3] The city block is shared with the New York Times Building to the west. Additionally, the building is near the Candler Building, Madame Tussauds New York, Empire Theatre, and Eleven Times Square to the northwest; the New Amsterdam Theatre and 5 Times Square to the north; and the Times Square Tower to the northeast.[1]

The Nederlander is the southernmost Broadway theater in the Theater District.[4][5] When the theater was built, the Metropolitan Opera House and seven other theaters were to the south and east, although all of them were closed and demolished by the late 20th century.[3][6] The lack of other Broadway theaters nearby, and its location at the extreme south end of the Theater District, contributed to its relative unpopularity in the late 20th century.[6] This sharply contrasted with venues on 42nd Street, a major crosstown artery, and venues on 44th and 45th Streets, which benefited from tourist traffic around Shubert Alley.[7]

Design

The theater was designed by William Neil Smith for Walter C. Jordan.[8][9][10] The theater contains a floor area of 24,975 square feet (2,320.3 m2), as well as 130,825 square feet (12,154.0 m2) of unused air rights.[11]

Facade

The brick facade is relatively plain, blending in with other buildings on 41st Street.[12] At ground level are entrances to the theater.[13] There is an iron fire escape on the second and third floors of the facade.[13][14] There are doors and windows on both levels that lead to the fire escape, and a metal canopy covers the fire escape. Above ground level, there are three arches on the facade: one to the left of the fire escape and two to the right. These archways originally contained windows at the second and third floors and are topped by keystones. A cornice with modillions runs above the top of the facade.[13] Unlike other Broadway theaters, the Nederlander does not have a dedicated stage door, so all performers use the main entrance.[15]

When the theater was renamed the Billy Rose Theatre in 1959, the facade was repainted white, leading Newsweek magazine to describe it as "an architect's memory of New Orleans' French Quarter".[14] During the production of the musical Rent between 1996 and 2008, the facade was covered with fake graffiti.[15]

Auditorium

The Nederlander Theatre has an orchestra level and one balcony.[16] The theater was built with 1,200 seats.[17] According to the Broadway League, the theater has 1,235 seats;[18] meanwhile, Playbill gives a figure of 1,168 seats.[16] Only the orchestra level is wheelchair-accessible; the other seating levels can only be reached by steps.[19] The restrooms are at the first balcony level.[16][19] The balcony is raked, sloping downward toward the stage. In contrast to other theaters, the underside of the balcony slopes upward, increasing visibility at the rear of the orchestra.[9][10] The orchestra level slopes down toward a orchestra pit in front of the stage. To improve acoustics, the floor of the orchestra pit contained shards of glass, which were then laid atop a concrete slab.[9]

Originally, the auditorium was designed in the early Renaissance style.[9][10][20] Unlike other theaters operated by the Shubert family, the interior contained little plaster decoration.[12] The interior was made of concrete, which was decorated to resemble burnished Italian walnut panels decorated with gold.[3] The fake woodwork was decorated with "lyric and epic subjects", which protruded slightly from the walnut panels.[9][10][20] The walls and balustrades were grained to give the impression of woodwork.[9][20] Actual carved wood was used for lintels and sills.[9] There were 18 multicolored lights on the auditorium's ceiling,[9][10] and a 12-foot-tall (3.7 m) crystal chandelier was suspended from the center of the ceiling.[21] At the rear of the auditorium was a projector.[9][10] The proscenium arch at the front of the auditorium is 40 feet (12 m) tall.[9][10][20] The arch contained a few classical details,[12] and its keystone was originally decorated with the letter "N".[22] The arch was initially flanked by one tier of boxes in a streamlined style.[3] The stage itself is 86 feet (26 m) wide, with a height of 100 feet (30 m) from the floor to the overhead gridiron.[10][20]

When Billy Rose renovated the theater in 1959, he made a variety of changes, including repainting the auditorium red, white, and gold.[14][22][23] The auditorium's light boxes were originally flanked by plaster cornucopias, but Rose largely replaced them with curlicues.[3] In addition, the original lighting fixtures were replaced with 1950s-style chandeliers;[3] the central chandelier was surrounded by four smaller chandeliers.[23] The arch's keystone was replaced with an "R" keystone after Rose renovated the theater.[22] Rose added a second tier of Moorish-style boxes purely for decorative effect.[3] The carpet was redesigned in 1996 and again in 2008. Most of the original decoration was restored in 2008, when Rose's second tier of boxes was redesigned in a streamlined style.[3]

The south wall of the auditorium contained emergency-exit doors to an alleyway,[21] which was converted into a smoking lounge in 1959.[14][22] Performers used this alleyway during intermissions if they did not want to interact with members of the public.[15] The backstage area contained dressing rooms with bathrooms and windows, which local media described at the time as "the last word in utility and luxury".[9][10] The theater had been built as a fireproof structure with skylights, water tanks, and hoses. The theater's offices were on the second floor, directly under the balcony, and were accessed from 41st Street.[9][10] During the 1959 renovation, Rose added a visitors' lounge for performers, and he replaced the roof and water tanks.[22]

History

Development and early years

The Nederlander Theatre was constructed in 1920 as a carpenter's shop; plans filed with the New York City government called for a "3 sty [non-fireproof] brick Carpenter's shop and storage, club rooms, shower, [apartments] and tennis court".[3] It is one of a few Broadway theaters not constructed specifically to host Broadway shows.[3] In 1921, Walter C. Jordan acquired the building and spent $950,000 to convert it into a theater.[8] The stage house, mezzanine, proscenium, fire escape, and other theatrical equipment was built at a cost of $175,000.[3] Work was nearly completed by May 1921.[24] The venue was originally supposed to be known as the Times Square Theatre, but this name was already being used by another structure at 217 West 42nd Street.[25] As such, Jordan renamed the structure the National Theatre at the end of July 1921,[26] shortly after booking Swords (Sidney Howard's first play[8]) as the theater's first production.[26][27] The Shubert brothers were hired as the theater's managers.[28]

Katharine Cornell as Mary Fitton in the Broadway production of Clemence Dane's play Will Shakespeare at the National Theatre
Katharine Cornell as Mary Fitton in the Broadway production of Clemence Dane's play Will Shakespeare at the National Theatre

The theater opened on September 2, 1921, with Swords.[29][30] John Willard's melodrama The Cat and the Canary, which opened at the National in February 1922,[31] was a major critical success[8] and ran for three months.[32] Walter Hampden leased the National for a year beginning in 1923,[33] paying $1 million, which at the time was a record for a Broadway theater.[34][35] Hampden presented a revival of the play Cyrano de Bergerac,[36][37] which was a success, lasting for 250 performances.[17][38] The theater building was less successful, having gone into receivership in November 1923 after Jordan failed to make payments on a mortgage.[39] When his lease expired, Hampden chose to instead operate his own theater.[38]

The National then hosted the melodrama Silence in 1924, with H. B. Warner, and the farce The Bride Retires in 1925, with Lila Lee.[17] Later in 1925, the theater staged The Gorilla, which transferred from the Selwyn,[40] as well as a revival of Hamlet.[41][42] During 1926, the National hosted live performances by magician Harry Houdini;[43][44] the play The Half-Caste, starring Fredric March;[43][45] and George M. Cohan's adaptation of the play Yellow.[46][47] Jordan, who continued to own the theater, was charged with tax fraud in late 1926 after failing to pay the theater's property taxes.[48]

Shubert management

1920s and 1930s

In February 1927, the Shubert brothers bought the National Theatre from the Sanjor Corporation, which had owned the theater for eight years.[49][50] Later that year, Willard staged a short-lived play, Fog, at the theater.[46][51] This was followed in September 1927 by Bayard Veiller's melodrama The Trial of Mary Dugan, which ran at the National for nearly a year before relocating.[52][53] Subsequently, the Martin Flavin play The Criminal Code opened at the National in 1929 and lasted for 174 performances.[54][55] A troupe led by Chinese actor Mei Lanfang briefly performed at the theater in early 1930,[46][56] followed later that year by the play Grand Hotel (based on Vicki Baum's book Grand Hotel),[43][57] which ran for 459 performances.[58][59]

At the onset of the Great Depression, many Broadway theaters were impacted by declining attendance,[60] and the theater largely hosted flops in 1932 and 1933.[61] Alfred E. Aarons and Harry J. Sommers leased the National for a year beginning in August 1933,[62][63] and they renovated the National's auditorium the next month.[21] Meanwhile, the Dry Dock Savings Bank took over the theater that September as a result of a foreclosure auction.[64] By then, the National was in danger of being demolished because of a sharp increase in real-estate values.[65] The theater hosted Sean O'Casey's play Within the Gates in 1934.[61][66] Subsequently, Guthrie McClintic's production of the drama Ethan Frome was presented there in January 1936,[67][68] as well as Noel Coward's anthology of plays Tonight at 8:30 that November.[69][70] The Mercury Theatre company, led by John Houseman and Orson Welles, performed revivals of the plays Julius Caesar and The Shoemaker's Holiday at the National in 1937 and 1938.[71] The Lillian Hellman drama The Little Foxes, starring Tallulah Bankhead,[72][73] then opened in February 1939 and lasted for 410 performances.[74]

1940s and 1950s

The Emlyn Williams play The Corn Is Green opened at the National in 1940,[75] starring Ethel Barrymore for more than a year.[61][76] Margaret Webster's staging of Macbeth then opened in late 1941.[76][77] The Patriots by Sidney Kingsley opened at the National in 1943;[72][78][79] it was followed later the same year by Lerner and Loewe's first Broadway musical, What's Up?,[72][80] which was a flop.[81] A revival of Anton Chekhov's play The Cherry Orchard was hosted at the National in 1944, with Joseph Schildkraut and Eva Le Gallienne,[82][83] and Barrymore appeared later that year in the play Embezzled Heaven.[84][85] During the mid-1940s, the National hosted several productions with over one hundred performances each.[85] These included Lerner and Loewe's musical The Day Before Spring in 1945;[86][87] the revue Call Me Mister in 1946;[87][88] and the tragedy Medea with Judith Anderson in 1947.[87][89] The next several shows were relatively short-lived, including an adaptation of Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel Crime and Punishment in 1947, as well as revivals of Tonight at 8:30 and Macbeth in 1948.[85]

The National's next hit was Charles Gaynor's revue Lend an Ear in late 1948.[87][90][91] This was followed the next year by Clifford Odets's The Big Knife,[92][93] as well as a revival of Caesar and Cleopatra with Cedric Hardwicke and Lilli Palmer.[87][94][95] In 1950, the theater featured live performances by Les Ballets de Paris[85][96] and a revival of King Lear with Louis Calhern.[97][98] A revival of The Constant Wife, featuring Brian Aherne, Katharine Cornell, and Grace George, arrived at the theater the following year.[99][100][101] Tennessee Williams's play Camino Real was staged at the National in early 1953,[102][103] and the comedy of manners Sabrina Fair opened later the same year.[104][105][106] The National hosted the play Inherit the Wind starting in 1955.[107][108][109] With 806 performances, Inherit the Wind was the theater's most successful non-musical to date,[110] as well as its longest-lasting production for several decades.[6]

By the 1950s, the Shubert Organization operated nearly half of all legitimate theaters in New York City, prompting the U.S. federal government to file an antitrust suit against the Shubert family. As part of a settlement made in February 1956, the Shuberts had to sell off some of their theaters.[111][112] In particular, the Shuberts had to sell the National Theatre within one year of the ruling, and they had to sell three other theaters[b] within two years.[113] That September, the Shuberts sold the National to Harry Fromkes for an estimated $900,000; at the time, Inherit the Wind was still being staged at the theater.[114][115] Fromkes died after a fall from his apartment in February 1958,[116] prompting the closure of the play Winesburg, Ohio, which was being performed there at the time.[117] Fromkes's firm defaulted on its mortgage after his death, and the New York Supreme Court appointed a receiver to manage the theater that March.[118] The receiver booked the Harry Kurnitz play Once More, with Feeling!,[119] which opened in late 1958[107][120] and ran for 263 performances.[121]

Rose management

Theatrical producer Billy Rose bought the National at a foreclosure auction in June 1958 for $849,500.[122][123] At the time, Rose worked for William Zeckendorf's real-estate company Webb and Knapp; this prompted Zeckendorf to sue Rose for ownership of the theater.[124] Rose spent $500,000 to renovate the theater, hiring Oliver Messel to redecorate the auditorium in a red, gold, and white color scheme.[22][23] The venue was renamed the Billy Rose Theatre and reopened on October 18, 1959, with the play Heartbreak House,[125][126] which had 112 performances.[127] The next year, the theater hosted Dear Liar,[128][129] which was notable as Katharine Cornell's last Broadway appearance,[130] as well as a drama based on John Hersey's novel The Wall.[131][132] The Billy Rose's next hit was Edward Albee's play Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, which opened in 1962[133][134] and ran for 660 performances over the next two years.[135][136]

Throughout the 1960s, the theater was often empty for extended periods because of a lack of productions.[137] Albee's play Tiny Alice, featuring John Gielgud and Irene Worth, opened at the theater at the end of 1964,[138] but it was not successful.[133][139] The theater hosted a variety of repertory productions in the late 1960s. These included Yiddish theater performances by the Jewish State Theater of Poland[140] and performances by the Paul Taylor Dance Company in 1967.[141] The Playwrights Repertory Theatre performed several plays by Albee and Samuel Beckett at the theater in 1968,[131][142] and the Minnesota Dance Theatre performed two plays there later that year.[131][143] Following a performance by the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in early 1969,[144] the revival of Noel Coward's Private Lives was presented later the same year.[133][145][146]

The Billy Rose hosted two notable shows in 1971: the Royal Shakespeare Company's version of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream,[133][147][148] as well as Harold Pinter's drama Old Times.[133][149][150] The City Center Acting Company performed four plays at the Billy Rose in late 1973 and early 1974, marking the company's first Broadway appearance.[151] This was followed in 1974 by Tom Stoppard's play Jumpers, which had 48 performances before closing.[137][152] The theater's backstage area was damaged by a storm later the same year and was not repaired; as a result, at least two productions were unable to lease the theater in 1975.[153] Several theatrical personalities alleged that the Billy Rose Foundation (which had acquired the theater after Rose died), had allowed the structure to deteriorate. In response, foundation officials said that operating the theater was not its main priority.[153] The Taylor Dance Company returned to the Billy Rose in 1976.[154] The theater's first legitimate show in three years, Gus Weill's The November People, closed after a single performance in January 1978.[155][156]

Nederlander management

Late 1970s and 1980s

Two theatrical operators, the Nederlander Organization and the Cooney-Marsh Organization (the latter of which was a partnership between producer Ray Cooney and real-estate developer Laurie Marsh[157]), purchased the venue in December 1978.[158][159] The venue was immediately renamed the Trafalgar Theatre, a reference to the new owners' British backgrounds;[157] the owners hoped that the new name would evoke Trafalgar Square in London or the Battle of Trafalgar.[160] James M. Nederlander of the Nederlander Organization said: "We want to put big English hits in the theater".[157] The Trafalgar hosted two productions under its new name:[133] Whose Life Is It Anyway? in 1979[161][162] and Betrayal in 1980.[163][164] James M. Nederlander renamed the theater again in 1980 in honor of his father, American theater impresario David T. Nederlander,[165] who had died thirteen years prior.[166] The first show at the renamed Nederlander Theatre would have been the musical One Night Stand,[167] which closed during previews in October 1980.[168][169]

Lena Horne performed her solo show Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music at the theater starting in May 1981;[170][171] the show lasted for more than a year.[172][173] In general, the Nederlander Theatre had difficulty securing bookings during the 1980s.[174] The next several productions had relatively short runs,[137] including one show, Teaneck Tanzi: The Venus Flytrap, which closed on its opening day in 1983.[175][176] The theater's productions in the mid-1980s included 84 Charing Cross Road, Amen Corner, Strange Interlude and Raggedy Ann,[177] as well as a live show taped by Robert Klein in June 1986.[178] In addition, Jerry Weintraub purchased a stake in the operation of the Nederlander Theatre in 1984.[179][180]

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) had started considering protecting the Nederlander as a landmark in 1982,[181] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[182] While the LPC commenced a wide-ranging effort to grant landmark status to Broadway theaters in 1987,[183] the Nederlander was among the few theaters for which the LPC denied either exterior or interior landmark status.[184][c] David Wilkerson, founding pastor of the Times Square Church, leased the theater in January 1988,[186] a month after the play Sherlock's Last Case had closed.[187] The theater quickly became overcrowded during church services;[188] by 1989, the 1,150-seat Nederlander Theatre was at standing-room only capacity five days a week.[189] This prompted the Nederlanders to lease the Mark Hellinger Theatre to the Times Square Church in February 1989;[190][191] the Times Square Church moved to the Hellinger the next month.[189] The Nederlander Theatre's next legitimate show, the musical Dangerous Games, lasted four performances.[192][193]

1990s and 2000s

Seen in 2004 during the production of Rent
Seen in 2004 during the production of Rent

The Shuberts, the Nederlanders, and Jujamcyn formed the Broadway Alliance in June 1990, wherein each company set aside one of its theaters to present dramas and comedies at reduced ticket prices.[194] The program covered the Belasco, Nederlander, and Walter Kerr theaters.[195] The Broadway Alliance's first show at the Nederlander Theatre was the play Our Country's Good,[196] which lasted from April to June 1991.[197][198] More than one year elapsed before the Nederlander hosted its next production, the one-man show Solitary Confinement with Stacy Keach,[199] which ran for two weeks in November 1992.[200][201] The theater was still difficult to rent[202] and did not host any Broadway shows for over three years;[4] it cost around $250,000 a year to maintain, regardless of whether it was vacant.[11] The Nederlander hosted concerts by Aretha Franklin in April 1993[203][204] and by Jackson Browne that November.[205][206] The Nederlander Organization unsuccessfully tried to move Cy Coleman's musical The Life there in 1994, but the theater instead hosted auditions for the musical Busker Alley.[207] The next year, the Nederlander hosted another audition, this time for the musical The Capeman.[208]

Jonathan Larson's Pulitzer Prize-winning musical Rent was booked at the Nederlander in early 1996;[4] the musical's producers had selected the Nederlander Theatre specifically because of its dilapidated surroundings, which reflected the show's setting.[4][209] The theater's facade and interior were remodeled to resemble a lower Manhattan nightclub.[6][209] Rent premiered in April 1996[210][211] and quickly became popular.[209][212] In contrast to many Broadway productions (in which tickets for seats at the rear of the theater were generally the cheapest), Rent's producers reserved the first two rows for the cheapest tickets. This prompted fans to sleep outside the theater to wait for these tickets.[209][213] The opening of Rent, as well as the renovation of the nearby New Amsterdam Theatre, contributed to the revitalization of the surrounding block of 41st Street.[6] Rent ultimately ran for 5,140 performances through 2008,[214][215] becoming the theater's longest-running production[209] as well as the seventh-longest-running Broadway show of all time.[214]

After Rent closed, the Nederlander was refurbished to accommodate its next show.[3][216] Workers expanded the restrooms and restored the original design motifs (which had been largely removed during the 1961 renovation).[3] A revival of Guys and Dolls, starring Oliver Platt and Lauren Graham, opened in March 2009;[217][218] the show played 113 performances before closing that June.[219][220] The Neil Simon plays Brighton Beach Memoirs and Broadway Bound were planned to be performed at the theater in late 2009, with alternating performances of each play.[221] Due to poor ticket sales for Brighton Beach Memoirs, the show closed on November 1, 2009, one week after its opening.[222][223] Simon also canceled the planned production of Broadway Bound, blaming the theater's location for the rapid closure of Brighton Beach Memoirs.[7]

2000s to present

Detail of marquee and fire escape during the run of the musical Newsies
Detail of marquee and fire escape during the run of the musical Newsies

The musical Million Dollar Quartet made its Broadway debut at the theater in April 2010,[224] running for 489 performances[225][226] before moving off-Broadway in June 2011.[226][227] Disney's production of the musical Newsies opened in March 2012;[228][229] the show's run was extended because of its popularity,[230] and Newsies ultimately lasted until August 2014.[231][232] As part of a settlement with the United States Department of Justice in 2014, the Nederlanders agreed to improve disabled access at their nine Broadway theaters, including the Nederlander Theatre.[233][234] Love Letters was originally scheduled to run at the Nederlander after Newsies closed.[235] Instead, the musical Honeymoon in Vegas opened at the theater in January 2015,[236][237] followed by Amazing Grace that July.[238][239] The Nederlander hosted two short-lived shows in 2016. The musical Disaster! made its Broadway debut at the theater that March, lasting two months,[240][241] while a revival of Motown: The Musical opened that July and ran for less than a month.[242][243]

The musical War Paint ran at the Nederlander from April to November 2017,[244][245] followed by Pretty Woman: The Musical from August 2018 to August 2019.[246][247] The Nederlander then hosted two live appearances in late 2019: Kristin Chenoweth's For The Girls in November[248][249] and Harry Connick Jr.'s A Celebration of Cole Porter the following month.[250][251] The Lehman Trilogy was planned to open at the Nederlander in March 2020.[252] The show was in previews[253] when all Broadway theaters were shut down on March 12, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[254] The Nederlander reopened on September 25, 2021, with previews of The Lehman Trilogy,[253] which ran from October 2021 to January 2022.[255][256] The musical Mr. Saturday Night then ran from April to September 2022,[257][258] and it was followed by Jefferson Mays's solo production of A Christmas Carol at the end of the year.[259][260] The musical comedy Shucked is scheduled to open at the Nederlander in April 2023.[261][262]

Notable productions

National Theatre

Billy Rose Theatre

Trafalgar Theatre/Nederlander Theatre

Box office record

Rent set the Nederlander Theatre's box-office record for the week ending November 29, 2005, when it grossed $744,496 while playing to 97 percent capacity.[325] Newsies achieved the box office record for the Nederlander Theatre in 2012, playing to 101 percent[326] capacity and grossed $1,024,516.60 for eight performances the week ending April 15, 2012.[327] This gross was surpassed by War Paint the week ending April 23, 2017, when that show grossed $1,042,449.[328] The current gross record was set by Pretty Woman: The Musical, which grossed $1,266,873 over eight performances for the week ending December 9, 2018.[329]

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b This capacity is approximate and may vary depending on the show.
  2. ^ The Shuberts had to pick from the Adelphi, Ambassador, Belasco, Longacre, Maxine Elliott, or Ritz theaters, selling two of the six theaters. In addition, the Shuberts had to sell the St. James Theatre, but that was under a more lax contract that allowed the family to lease out the St. James or the Imperial Theatre if they could not find a buyer.[113]
  3. ^ Only the Broadway, Nederlander, and Ritz theaters were denied both interior and exterior landmark status. Several other theaters had either their exterior or interior landmark status rejected, but not both.[184] Hearings for several theaters on 42nd Street were deferred to 2016, when they were rejected.[185]
  4. ^ a b c These were performed in repertory.
  5. ^ One Night Stand never officially opened at the Nederlander Theatre; it only played previews.[168]

Citations

  1. ^ a b c "208 West 41 Street, 10036". New York City Department of City Planning. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  2. ^ White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot; Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 296. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Venutolo, Anthony (October 18, 2008). "Curtain call". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on December 5, 2014. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d Marks, Peter (March 4, 1996). "A Proper Home for 'Rent,' On Wrong Side of Tracks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  5. ^ "Nederlander Theatre (Broadway)". Reference: At This Theatre. Playbill. Archived from the original on November 6, 2014. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  6. ^ a b c d e Dunlap, David W. (August 25, 1996). "41st Street Edges Into Times Square". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  7. ^ a b Healy, Patrick (November 2, 2009). "Neil Simon on 'Brighton Beach' Closing: Location, Location, Location?". ArtsBeat. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  8. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 183; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 137.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "National Theater, New House of Intimate Type, to Open Aug. 15: Many Novelties of Construction in Walter C. Jordan's Playhouse in 41st Street; To Play Legitimate Productions". New-York Tribune. July 31, 1921. p. C4. ProQuest 576412244.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "National Theatre Latest Addition To Times Square Playhouses; Many Novelties of Construction in Walter C. Jordan's House on West Forty-first Street, Built at a Cost of $950,000, to Open Monday, August 29". The New York Times. August 21, 1921. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  11. ^ a b Dunlap, David W. (January 25, 1998). "Theater Air Rights Plan Awaits Reviews". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  12. ^ a b c Morrison 1999, p. 119.
  13. ^ a b c Morrison 1999, p. 118.
  14. ^ a b c d "Return of Billy the Kid". Newsweek. Vol. 54, no. 18. November 2, 1959. pp. 97–98. ProQuest 1832551114.
  15. ^ a b c Kelley, Tina (March 8, 2008). "The Writing on the Wall at 'Rent'". City Room. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  16. ^ a b c "Nederlander Theatre (1980) New York, NY". Playbill. January 18, 2016. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  17. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 137.
  18. ^ The Broadway League. "Nederlander Theatre – New York, NY". IBDB. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  19. ^ a b "Nederlander Theatre". Broadway Direct. Nederlander Organization. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  20. ^ a b c d e "Jordan's". The Billboard. Vol. 33, no. 32. August 6, 1921. p. 21. ProQuest 1031658150.
  21. ^ a b c Beebe, Lucius (September 24, 1933). "Blue, Gold, Cream and Crystal Rejuvenate National Theater". New York Herald Tribune. p. D2. ISSN 1941-0646. ProQuest 1115004373.
  22. ^ a b c d e f Calta, Louis (September 10, 1959). "Billy Rose Talks of His Theatre; Redesigned National, With Edwardian Flavor, Will Be Named for Him". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  23. ^ a b c Crist, Judith (October 8, 1959). "Billy Rose Theater-- Motives and Motifs". New York Herald Tribune. p. 21. ISSN 1941-0646. ProQuest 1323995019.
  24. ^ "Gossip of the Rialto". The New York Times. May 1, 1921. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  25. ^ "Gossip of the Rialto". The New York Times. July 24, 1921. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  26. ^ a b "Gossip of the Rialto". The New York Times. July 31, 1921. p. 62. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 98426311.
  27. ^ "The Stage Door". New-York Tribune. July 29, 1921. p. 8. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  28. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 183.
  29. ^ Allen, Kelcey (September 2, 1921). "Pemberton Opens National Theatre With Tragic Play: "Swords," by Sidney Howard, Stars Clare Eames, Who Carries Part Well—Excellent Scenery by Jones". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 23, no. 54. p. 11. ProQuest 1666006184.
  30. ^ Woollcott, Alexander (September 2, 1921). "The Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  31. ^ a b Woollcott, Alexander (February 8, 1922). "The Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  32. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 7, 1922). "The Cat and the Canary – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on April 23, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Cat and the Canary (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1922)". Playbill. Archived from the original on February 9, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  33. ^ Allen, Kelcey (March 30, 1923). "Amusements: Walter Hampden Leases National Theatre". Women's Wear. Vol. 26, no. 75. p. 21. ProQuest 1666184140.
  34. ^ "Hampden Leases National Theater at Record Rental". The Billboard. Vol. 35, no. 7. February 17, 1923. p. 6. ProQuest 1031704066.
  35. ^ "Hampden Takes Theater With Record Rental". Star-Gazette. February 17, 1923. p. 11. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  36. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 1, 1923). "Cyrano de Bergerac – Broadway Play – 1923 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 18, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Cyrano de Bergerac (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1923)". Playbill. Archived from the original on February 14, 2020. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  37. ^ Corbin, John (November 2, 1923). "Walter Hampden". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  38. ^ a b "Walter Hampden Tells of His Plans: Will Have New York Theatre of His Own Where He Will Play Though the Year". Boston Daily Globe. November 23, 1924. p. 60. ProQuest 497986720.
  39. ^ "Legitimate: Receiver Appointed for Jordan's Nat'l". Variety. Vol. 72, no. 11. November 1, 1923. p. 14. ProQuest 1505629831.
  40. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 28, 1925). "The Gorilla – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on April 8, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Gorilla (Broadway, American Airlines Theatre, 1925)". Playbill. Archived from the original on April 8, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  41. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 10, 1925). "Hamlet – Broadway Play – 1925 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on July 19, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  42. ^ "Modern Clothes 'Hamlet' Returning to Broadway". The New York Herald, New York Tribune. December 4, 1925. p. 18. ProQuest 1112938236.
  43. ^ a b c d e f Bloom 2007, p. 183; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 138.
  44. ^ "Magic and Magicians: Houdini Closes on Broadway; Now Playing Washington". The Billboard. Vol. 38, no. 4. January 23, 1926. p. 46. ProQuest 1031772526.
  45. ^ Hall, Mordaunt (March 29, 1926). "The Screen". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  46. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 138.
  47. ^ "Yellow' Premiere at National Theatre; New Cohan Production, by Maraget Vernon, Is a Study of the Perfect Rotter". The New York Times. September 22, 1926. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  48. ^ "National Theater Men Indicted for Tax Fraud". The Billboard. Vol. 38, no. 28. July 26, 1926. p. 9. ProQuest 1031801464.
  49. ^ "Shuberts Buy Theatre: Purchase the National in West Forty-first Street". The New York Times. February 5, 1927. p. 28. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 104239646.
  50. ^ "Wallach Bros. Get Space In Brooklyn Building". New York Herald Tribune. February 5, 1927. p. 26. ISSN 1941-0646. ProQuest 1131897445.
  51. ^ "'Fog' a Mystery Play in Nautical Setting; John Willard's 'Melodrama,' With Trick Disappearances at Sea, Provides Many Thrills". The New York Times. February 8, 1927. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  52. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 19, 1927). "The Trial of Mary Dugan – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 6, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Trial of Mary Dugan (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1927)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  53. ^ "The Trial of Mary Dugan" to Move". The New York Times. June 8, 1928. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  54. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 2, 1929). "The Criminal Code – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Criminal Code (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1929)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  55. ^ a b ""Criminal Code" to Tour; Will End Its New York Run on March 1, After 174 Performances". The New York Times. February 18, 1930. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  56. ^ "Mei Lan-fang Gives a New Program; Reveals Again His Limpid, Plastic Acting in the Ancient Forms of Chinese Theatre". The New York Times. March 10, 1930. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  57. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (November 23, 1930). "City Episodes; "Grand Hotel" With a Multiplicity of Scenes --Characters and Incidents That Represent Metropolitan Life in Miniature". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  58. ^ "'Grand Hotel' to End Its Long Run Dec. 5; Will Conclude Almost 13 Months at National and Go to Chicago --Broke Two Records". The New York Times. November 15, 1931. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  59. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 13, 1930). "Grand Hotel – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on September 21, 2015. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Grand Hotel (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Archived from the original on November 21, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  60. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 189.
  61. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 139.
  62. ^ "News of the Theaters: National to Be Redecorated; Jean Arthur Gets Leading Role in 'curtain Rises'". New York Herald Tribune. August 16, 1933. p. 10. ISSN 1941-0646. ProQuest 1221353773.
  63. ^ "Take Over National Theatre". The New York Times. August 16, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  64. ^ "Bank Takes Over Theatre at Auction; The National, in 41st Street, Is One of Several Parcels Bid In at Foreclosures". The New York Times. September 22, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  65. ^ "Legitimate: Only 35 Theatres Left for Legit; 17 Houses Switched Their Policies During Past Season; Once Were 60". Variety. Vol. 114, no. 7. May 1, 1934. p. 47. ProQuest 1475821537.
  66. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 23, 1934). "THE PLAY; Fantasy of the Seasons in Hyde Park in Sean O'Casey's 'Within the Gates.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  67. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 21, 1936). "Ethan Frome – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved September 9, 2022."Ethan Frome (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1936)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  68. ^ a b Atkinson, Brooks (January 22, 1936). "The Play; Ruth Gordon, Pauline Lord and Raymond Massey in a Dramatization of 'Ethan Frome.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  69. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 24, 1936). "Tonight at 8:30 – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 21, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Tonight at 8:30 (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1936)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  70. ^ a b "News of the Stage; ' Tonight at 8:30' Opens Tonight, at 8:30 -- 'The Eternal Road' Now Due Late Next Month". The New York Times. November 24, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  71. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 183; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 139–140.
  72. ^ a b c d e Bloom 2007, p. 183; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 140.
  73. ^ a b Atkinson, Brooks (February 16, 1939). "THE PLAY; Tallulah Bankhead Appearing in Lillian Hellman's Drama of the South, 'The Little Foxes'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  74. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 15, 1939). "The Little Foxes – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on May 23, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Little Foxes (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1939)". Playbill. Archived from the original on May 7, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  75. ^ "'The Corn is Green' Will Open Tonight; Ethel Barrymore Has Lead in Play by Emlyn Williams at the National Theatre". The New York Times. November 26, 1940. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  76. ^ a b "Evans Will Close 'Macbeth' Feb. 28; To Conclude Run Here After 131 Performances -- Extensive Tour on Road Planned". The New York Times. January 17, 1942. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  77. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 11, 1941). "Macbeth – Broadway Play – 1941 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on October 26, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Macbeth (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1941)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  78. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 29, 1943). "The Patriots – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 27, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Patriots (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1943)". Playbill. Archived from the original on November 18, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  79. ^ a b "News of the Theater: Sidney Kingsley's 'Patriots' to Be Presented Tonight at the National Theater". New York Herald Tribune. January 29, 1943. p. 12. ISSN 1941-0646. ProQuest 1267896931.
  80. ^ Nichols, Lewis (November 12, 1943). "THE PLAY; A Group of Young People Sing and Dance the Measures of 'What's Up' at the National". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  81. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 11, 1943). "What's Up – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on February 22, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "What's Up? (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1943)". Playbill. Archived from the original on November 28, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  82. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 183; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 140–141.
  83. ^ Nichols, Lewis (January 26, 1944). "The Play in Review; Eva LeGallienne and Joseph Schildkraut Are Starred in a Revival of 'Cherry Orchard' at the National Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  84. ^ Zolotow, Sam (October 31, 1944). "Ethel Barrymore Returns Tonight; Stars in 'Embezzled Heaven,' Opening at the National After Successful Tour". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  85. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 141.
  86. ^ a b Zolotow, Sam (November 22, 1945). "Premiere Tonight of Wilson Musical; Day Before Spring,' Bowing at National, to Feature Irene Manning, Johnson, Archer "Rich Full Life" to Quit Twenty Matinees Today". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  87. ^ a b c d e f g Bloom 2007, p. 183; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 141.
  88. ^ a b Zolotow, Sam (April 18, 1946). "'Call Me Mister' Arriving Tonight; Revue Co-Produced by Melvyn Douglas Due at National-- Betty Garrett Featured". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  89. ^ a b Zolotow, Sam (October 20, 1947). "Revival of 'Medea' to Arrive Tonight; Whitehead and Rea, Youthful Team, Offer Judith Anderson and John Gielgud in Leads". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  90. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 16, 1948). "Lend an Ear – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 30, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Lend an Ear (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1948)". Playbill. Archived from the original on January 30, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  91. ^ Shanley, J. p (December 16, 1948). "Gaynor Musical Arrives Tonight; 'Lend an Ear,' Under Auspices of Katzell, Gilbert, Eythe, Opening at National". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  92. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 24, 1949). "The Big Knife – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Big Knife (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1949)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  93. ^ a b Calta, Louis (February 24, 1949). "Odets' 'Big Knife' in Debut Tonight; Wiman Production Starring John Garfield Will Bow at National Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  94. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 21, 1949). "Caesar and Cleopatra – Broadway Play – 1949 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on October 30, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Caesar and Cleopatra (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1949)". Playbill. Archived from the original on April 22, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  95. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (December 22, 1949). "First Night at the Theatre; Shaw's 'Caesar and Cleopatra' With Cedric Hardwicke and Lilli Palmer". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  96. ^ Martin, John (October 9, 1950). "Ballets De Paris Opens 4-week Run; Petit's Company Returns for Second Season Here--Colette Marchand Dances 'Carmen'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  97. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 25, 1950). "King Lear – Broadway Play – 1950 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on April 4, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "King Lear (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1950)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 4, 2020. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  98. ^ a b Atkinson, Brooks (December 26, 1950). "First Night at the Theatre; Louis Calhern as King Lear in Shakespeare's Tragedy Acted at the National". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  99. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 183; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 141–142.
  100. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 8, 1951). "The Constant Wife – Broadway Play – 1951 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on February 27, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Constant Wife (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1951)". Playbill. Archived from the original on February 9, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  101. ^ Calta, Louis (December 8, 1951). "'Constant Wife' Arrives Tonight; Katharine Cornell to Appear in Own Production With Brian Aherne and Grace George". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  102. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 17, 1953). "Camino Real – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 23, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Camino Real (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1953)". Playbill. Archived from the original on April 17, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  103. ^ a b Shanley, J. P. (May 4, 1953). "Camino Real' Ends Its Run Saturday; Williams' Much-Debated Play on Boards Since March 19 -- Lillie Show Off May 30". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  104. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 11, 1953). "Sabrina Fair – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on February 4, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Sabrina Fair (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1953)". Playbill. Archived from the original on November 21, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  105. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 183; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 142.
  106. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 12, 1953). "First Night at the Theatre; Margaret Sullavan and Joseph Cotten Starred in Samuel Taylor's 'Sabrina Fair'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  107. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, pp. 183–184; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 142.
  108. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 21, 1955). "Inherit the Wind – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 6, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Inherit the Wind (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1955)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 3, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  109. ^ Funke, Lewis (April 22, 1955). "Theatre: Drama of the 'Monkey Trial'; 'Inherit the Wind' Is Play Upon History". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  110. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 142.
  111. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 230.
  112. ^ Ranzal, Edward (February 18, 1956). "Shubert Consents to Break Up Chain; Decree Calls for Sale of 12 Theatres in 6 Cities and Give Up Booking Unit". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  113. ^ a b Calta, Louis (May 19, 1956). "$2,100,000 Is Bid for the St. James; Offer Made to Shubert for Theatre That Must Be Sold Under Consent Decree Cullman Backs Merman Show Whisky and Drama". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  114. ^ Calta, Louis (September 27, 1956). "Shuberts Dispose of Theatre Here". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on February 21, 2017. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  115. ^ McCord, Bert (September 27, 1956). "National Theater Sold By Shuberts to Fromkes". New York Herald Tribune. p. 21. ISSN 1941-0646. ProQuest 1325257396.
  116. ^ "Theatre Owner Dies in 12-story Plunge". The New York Times. February 12, 1958. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on July 22, 2018.
  117. ^ a b Zolotow, Sam (February 24, 1958). "Theatre Refunds Paid by Donations; Ticket Holders to Show That Folded Being Reimbursed by Other Playhouses". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  118. ^ Gelb, Arthur (March 10, 1958). "Playhouse Here Ready to Reopen; Court-Named Receiver May Book Shows for National -- Lots of 'Lysistratas'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  119. ^ Gelb, Arthur (May 12, 1958). "Receiver Books Play at National; Theatre's Mortgagee Lists Kurnitz Comedy -- Betty Field in 'Touch of Poet'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  120. ^ a b Atkinson, Brooks (October 22, 1958). "Once More, With Feeling'; Harry Kurnitz Comedy Opens at National". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  121. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 21, 1958). "Once More, With Feeling – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on February 4, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Once More, With Feeling (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1958)". Playbill. Archived from the original on May 2, 2016. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  122. ^ Calta, Louis (June 12, 1958). "Billy Rose Buys 41st St. Theatre; The National Is Sold for $849,500 at Auction -- Two Signed for Musical". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  123. ^ "Billy Rose Buys the National at Auction". Daily News. June 12, 1958. p. 246. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  124. ^ Zolotow, Sam (August 13, 1959). "Zeckendorf Sues Rose for Theatre; Realty Man Says National Was Bought for His Firm -- Rise Stevens May Star". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  125. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 184; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 142.
  126. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 19, 1959). "Bernard Shaw's 'Heartbreak House'; Maurice Evans Stars in Comedy Revival Susannah and Elders' Acted in Church". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  127. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 18, 1959). "Heartbreak House – Broadway Play – 1959 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 24, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Heartbreak House (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1959)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 16, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  128. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 17, 1960). "Dear Liar – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 10, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Dear Liar (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1960)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 16, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  129. ^ a b Atkinson, Brooks (March 18, 1960). "Katharine Cornell and Brian Aherne Star". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  130. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 184; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 142–143.
  131. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 143.
  132. ^ Taubman, Howard (October 12, 1960). "Lampell Adaptation of Hersey Novel Opens". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  133. ^ a b c d e f Bloom 2007, p. 184; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 143.
  134. ^ Little, Stuart W. (October 16, 1962). "No One's Afraid of Virginia Woolf". New York Herald Tribune. p. 18. ISSN 1941-0646. ProQuest 1327472160.
  135. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 13, 1962). "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1962)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on December 5, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  136. ^ a b "'Virginia Woolf' to Close May 16". The New York Times. May 5, 1964. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  137. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 184.
  138. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 29, 1964). "Tiny Alice – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Tiny Alice (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1964)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on November 18, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  139. ^ a b "' Tiny Alice' to Close May 22; Will Try London in Summer". The New York Times. May 10, 1965. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  140. ^ Shepard, Richard F. (November 17, 1967). "Theater: Yiddish Brecht; Ida Kaminska Appears as Mother Courage". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  141. ^ Barnes, Clive (December 22, 1967). "The Dance: Paul Taylor Begins Broadway Season; 'Orbs' Returns, Fresh and Rich as Ever 'Post Meridian' Echoes Space-Time Themes". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  142. ^ Barnes, Clive (October 11, 1968). "The Theater: 'Krapp's Last Tape' and 'Zoo Story'; Plays by Beckett and Albee Are Revived Directed by Schneider and Barr at Billy Rose". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  143. ^ Barnes, Clive (December 18, 1968). "Theater: Guthrie's Minnesota Company Arrives; Repertory Players in First New York Visit 'The House of Atreus' by Aeschylus Adapted". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  144. ^ Barnes, Clive (January 28, 1969). "Dance: Ailey and Troupe in Triumph; Start Run on Broadway After a Decade Away". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  145. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 4, 1969). "Private Lives – Broadway Play – 1969 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 30, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Private Lives (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1969)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on January 30, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  146. ^ a b Barnes, Clive (December 5, 1969). "Theater: Tammy Grimes Cavorts in 'Private Lives'; Noel Coward Comedy of 1929 Revived Brian Bedford Plays Well-Bred Mate". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  147. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 20, 1971). "A Midsummer Night's Dream – Broadway Play – 1971 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 18, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "A Midsummer Night's Dream (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1971)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on October 14, 2016. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  148. ^ a b Barnes, Clive (January 21, 1971). "Theater: A Magical 'Midsummer Night's Dream'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  149. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 16, 1971). "Old Times – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on May 23, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Old Times (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1971)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on February 9, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  150. ^ a b Barnes, Clive (November 17, 1971). "Stage: Caught in the Sway of a Sea‐Changed Pinter". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  151. ^ Gussow, Mel (November 6, 1973). "City Center Actors Plan 4‐Week Broadway Run". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  152. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 22, 1974). "Jumpers – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on February 22, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Jumpers (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1974)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 9, 2020. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  153. ^ a b "Protest is Made on the Billy Rose". The New York Times. April 11, 1975. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  154. ^ McDonagh, Don (June 9, 1976). "Dance: Taylor Company in 3 Romps". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  155. ^ "'November People' Closes". The New York Times. January 17, 1978. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  156. ^ The Broadway League (January 14, 1978). "The November People – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved September 9, 2022."The November People (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1978)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  157. ^ a b c Lawson, Carol (December 13, 1978). "New Jobs for Tune and Nichols". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  158. ^ "Legitimate: Nederlanders, Cooney-Marsh Buy Billy Rose Theatre, N.Y.; U.S.-London Theatre-Prod. Firm". Variety. Vol. 293, no. 6. December 13, 1978. pp. 100, 106. ProQuest 1401343465.
  159. ^ "Britain on Broadway". The Washington Post. December 13, 1978. p. D4. ISSN 0190-8286. ProQuest 146916188.
  160. ^ "Notes on People". The New York Times. April 4, 1979. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  161. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 17, 1979). "Whose Life is it Anyway? – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 19, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Whose Life Is It Anyway? (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1979)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on January 6, 2020. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  162. ^ a b Eder, Richard (April 18, 1979). "Stage: 'Whose Life Is It Anyway?' From Britain". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  163. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 5, 1980). "Betrayal – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 5, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Betrayal (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1980)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on February 2, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  164. ^ a b Kerr, Walter (January 7, 1980). "Play; Pinter's Betrayal,' Story of an Affair; From End to Beginning". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  165. ^ Kakutani, Michiko (September 14, 1980). "The Great Theater Duel and How It/Affects Broadway; How the Theater Duel Affects Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 10, 2022.
  166. ^ "David T. Nederlander, 81, Dies; Head of Theater-Owning Family; Detroit-Based Entrepreneur Was Second to Shuberts in Stage Holdings". The New York Times. October 17, 1967. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 13, 2022.
  167. ^ Corry, John (June 27, 1980). "Broadway; 'One Night Stand' due at Nederlander, formerly Trafalgar". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 10, 2022.
  168. ^ a b c The Broadway League (October 25, 1980). "One Night Stand – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 10, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  169. ^ a b "'One Night Stand' Closes In Previews". The New York Times. October 27, 1980. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 10, 2022.
  170. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 184; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 143–144.
  171. ^ Rich, Frank (May 13, 1981). "Theater: 'Lena Horne: the Lady and Her Music'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  172. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 12, 1981). "Lena Horne: "The Lady and Her Music" – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 11, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1981)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 12, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  173. ^ Corry, John (March 27, 1982). "News of the Theater; 'Horne' Closing June 30". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  174. ^ Rothstein, Mervyn (May 24, 1989). "Empty Theaters Bringing Concerts to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  175. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 20, 1983). "Teaneck Tanzi: The Venus Flytrap – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 4, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Teaneck Tanzi: The Venus Flytrap (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1983)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 15, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  176. ^ a b Rich, Frank (April 21, 1983). "Stage: 'Teaneck Tanzi,' Comedy From Britain". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  177. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 184; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 144.
  178. ^ a b Shepard, Richard F. (June 27, 1986). "The Stage: Robert Klein". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  179. ^ Freedman, Samuel G. (September 26, 1984). "Weintraub Buys Interest in Nederlander Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  180. ^ "Hollywood figure buys into theaters". Newsday. September 27, 1984. p. 171. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 15, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  181. ^ Dunlap, David W. (October 20, 1982). "Landmark Status Sought for Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  182. ^ Shepard, Joan (August 28, 1985). "Is the final curtain near?". New York Daily News. pp. 462, 464. Archived from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  183. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 22, 1987). "The Region; The City Casts Its Theaters In Stone". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 16, 2021.
  184. ^ a b "Landmarks Go for Final OK; City Hall Rally Planned". Back Stage. Vol. 29, no. 7. February 12, 1988. pp. 1A, 4A. ProQuest 962877791.
  185. ^ "7 Theaters on 42nd Street Fail to Make Cut for Landmark Consideration". DNAinfo New York. February 23, 2016. Archived from the original on November 29, 2020. Retrieved September 30, 2021.
  186. ^ Collins, Glenn (December 7, 1991). "Hellinger Theater Sold To Church". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  187. ^ "'Sherlock' Is Closing". The New York Times. December 3, 1987. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  188. ^ "A Times Square Church Gathers Rave Reviews". The New York Times. November 6, 1988. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  189. ^ a b Singleton, Don (March 5, 1989). "SRO for Jesus on Broadway". New York Daily News. p. 23. Archived from the original on December 14, 2021. Retrieved December 14, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  190. ^ "A Church to Occupy the Mark Hellinger Theater". Newsday. February 9, 1989. p. 155. Archived from the original on December 14, 2021. Retrieved December 14, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  191. ^ "Hellinger Theater Going to Church". Back Stage. Vol. 30, no. 7. February 17, 1989. p. 4A. ProQuest 962771570.
  192. ^ The Broadway League (October 19, 1989). "Dangerous Games – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved September 11, 2022."Dangerous Games (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1989)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  193. ^ "'Dangerous Games' Closing". The New York Times. October 21, 1989. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  194. ^ Rothstein, Mervyn (June 27, 1990). "Broadway Adopts A Plan to Cut Costs And Ticket Prices". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  195. ^ Rothstein, Mervyn (January 18, 1991). "In Rehearsal: Broadway At Cut Prices". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  196. ^ Rothstein, Mervyn (April 23, 1991). "Play That May Be Fateful for the Broadway Alliance". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  197. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 29, 1991). "Our Country's Good – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on October 21, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Our Country's Good (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1991)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 13, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  198. ^ a b Koenenn, Joseph C. (June 6, 1991). "Second Closing for Alliance". Newsday. pp. 81, 89. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  199. ^ Weber, Bruce (October 2, 1992). "On Stage, and Off". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  200. ^ The Broadway League (November 8, 1992). "Solitary Confinement – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved September 12, 2022."Solitary Confinement (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1992)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  201. ^ "'Solitary' Is Closing". The New York Times. November 25, 1992. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  202. ^ "Lights Go Up Again". The New York Times. January 28, 1994. p. C2. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 109300203.
  203. ^ Pareles, Jon (April 29, 1993). "Review/Pop; Aretha Franklin, In Stellar Company And on Her Own". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  204. ^ "The Do's and the Don'ts and Mostly the Duets". Daily News. April 29, 1993. p. 667. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  205. ^ Holden, Stephen (November 11, 1993). "Review/Pop; Jackson Browne Returns To the Private Domain". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  206. ^ Robbins, Ira (November 11, 1993). "Studies in Browne and Blue". Newsday (Suffolk Edition). p. 85. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  207. ^ Weber, Bruce (June 24, 1994). "On Stage, and Off". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  208. ^ Gonzalez, David (June 1, 1995). "Old Sounds Were Smooth And the Young Hopes High". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  209. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 145.
  210. ^ Winer, Linda (April 30, 1996). "The prize-winning 'Rent' moves to Broadway". Newsday. p. 72. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  211. ^ Brantley, Ben (April 30, 1996). "Theater Review; Enter Singing: Young, Hopeful And Taking On The Big Time". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  212. ^ Weber, Bruce (August 18, 2000). "Critic's Notebook; Renewing the Lease on the Innocence of Youth". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  213. ^ Jacobs, Leonard (September 5, 2002). "Seating the rush: SRO shows go the way of lotto". Back Stage. Vol. 43, no. 35. p. 3. ProQuest 221070323.
  214. ^ a b Dziemianowicz, Joe (September 7, 2008). "'Rent' is Moving Out". New York Daily News. p. 9. ProQuest 306224767.
  215. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 29, 1996). "Rent – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Rent (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1996)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on May 11, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  216. ^ Dziemianowicz, Joe (March 2, 2009). "'Guys and Dolls' Tries and Falls". New York Daily News. p. 25. ProQuest 306228546.
  217. ^ "Everything Old is New Again". Stage Directions. August 2009. Archived from the original on November 6, 2014. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  218. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (March 1, 2009). "It's a Cinch That the Bum Is Under the Thumb of Some Little Broad". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  219. ^ Itzkoff, Dave (June 9, 2009). "'Guys and Dolls' to Close on Sunday". ArtsBeat. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  220. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 1, 2009). "Guys and Dolls – Broadway Musical – 2009 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Guys and Dolls (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2009)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  221. ^ Itzkoff, Dave (June 17, 2009). "'Brighton Beach,' 'Broadway Bound' Revivals Find a Home". ArtsBeat. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  222. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 25, 2009). "Brighton Beach Memoirs – Broadway Play – 2009 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on February 4, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Brighton Beach Memoirs (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2009)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on March 20, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  223. ^ a b Healy, Patrick (November 2, 2009). "Neil Simon Flop May Be a Case of the Missing 'Wow'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  224. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (April 11, 2010). "Over at Sun Records, Whole Lotta Rock History Goin' On". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  225. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 11, 2010). "Million Dollar Quartet – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Million Dollar Quartet (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2010)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on April 20, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  226. ^ a b Piepenburg, Erik (June 7, 2011). "'Million Dollar Quartet' to Close, Then Move". ArtsBeat. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  227. ^ Hetrick, Adam (June 11, 2011). ""See You Later Alligator": Million Dollar Quartet Closes on Broadway June 12; Off-Broadway Is Next". Playbill. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  228. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 29, 2012). "Newsies The Musical – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 7, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Newsies (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2012)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  229. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (March 30, 2012). "Urchins With Punctuation". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  230. ^ Healy, Patrick (May 16, 2012). "Don't Stop the Press! 'Newsies' Run Is Now Open-Ended". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 7, 2014. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  231. ^ Healy, Patrick (June 23, 2014). "'Newsies' to Close in August". ArtsBeat. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  232. ^ Bowgen, Philippe (June 22, 2014). "Disney Musical Newsies to End Broadway Run". Playbill. Archived from the original on October 14, 2014. Retrieved November 7, 2014.
  233. ^ "9 Broadway theaters to gain disabled accessibility". Times Union. January 29, 2014. Archived from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  234. ^ "9 Broadway theaters to gain disabled accessibility". Yahoo Finance. February 11, 2015. Archived from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  235. ^ Kozinn, Allan (August 15, 2014). "'Love Letters' and 'Honeymoon in Vegas' Swap Broadway Theaters". ArtsBeat. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  236. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 15, 2015). "Honeymoon in Vegas – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Honeymoon in Vegas (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2015)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on January 2, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  237. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (January 16, 2015). "What Happens in Vegas Comes to New York". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  238. ^ a b The Broadway League (July 16, 2015). "Amazing Grace – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on September 5, 2015. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Amazing Grace (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2015)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on December 21, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  239. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (July 17, 2015). "Review: 'Amazing Grace,' the Story of a Slave Trader's Moral Awakening". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  240. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 8, 2016). "Disaster! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 23, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Disaster! (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2016)". Playbill. May 7, 2016. Archived from the original on March 11, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  241. ^ a b "Broadway's 'Disaster' Will Close, Having Drawn Just One Tony Nomination". The New York Times. May 3, 2016. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  242. ^ a b The Broadway League (July 12, 2016). "Motown The Musical – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 8, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Motown The Musical (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2016)". Playbill. July 1, 2016. Archived from the original on May 17, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  243. ^ a b Paulson, Michael (July 22, 2016). "'Motown: The Musical' to Close for Second Time on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  244. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 6, 2017). "War Paint – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "War Paint (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2017)". Playbill. July 2, 2017. Archived from the original on May 26, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  245. ^ a b Libbey, Peter (October 13, 2017). "LuPone Surgery Forces 'War Paint' to Announce Early Closing". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  246. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 16, 2018). "Pretty Woman: The Musical – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 19, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Pretty Woman: The Musical (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2018)". Playbill. July 3, 2019. Archived from the original on April 22, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  247. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (August 17, 2018). "Review: Chasing Shopworn Dreams in 'Pretty Woman: The Musical'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  248. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 8, 2019). "Kristin Chenoweth: For the Girls – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 10, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Kristin Chenoweth: For The Girls (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2019)". Playbill. September 17, 2019. Archived from the original on March 20, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  249. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (November 10, 2019). "When Home Is a Big Broadway Stage". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  250. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 12, 2019). "Harry Connick, Jr. - A Celebration of Cole Porter – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 10, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Harry Connick, Jr.—A Celebration of Cole Porter (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2019)". Playbill. July 26, 2019. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  251. ^ a b Solís, Jose (December 16, 2019). "'Harry Connick, Jr.: A Celebration of Cole Porter' Review". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  252. ^ Coleman, Nancy (September 3, 2019). "Acclaimed 'Lehman Trilogy' to Move to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  253. ^ a b Meyer, Dan (October 14, 2021). "The Lehman Trilogy Opens October 14 on Broadway at the Nederlander Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  254. ^ Paulson, Michael (March 12, 2020). "Broadway, Symbol of New York Resilience, Shuts Down Amid Virus Threat". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on September 16, 2021. Retrieved October 22, 2021.
  255. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 14, 2021). "The Lehman Trilogy – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 24, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "The Lehman Trilogy (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2021)". Playbill. January 3, 2022. Archived from the original on June 14, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  256. ^ a b Collins-Hughes, Laura (October 15, 2021). "Review: In 'The Lehman Trilogy,' a Vivid Tale of Profit and Pain". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  257. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 27, 2022). "Mr. Saturday Night – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 12, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    Special Arrangement with (November 10, 2021). "Mr. Saturday Night (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2022)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 14, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  258. ^ a b Paulson, Michael (July 17, 2022). "Billy Crystal's 'Mr. Saturday Night' Will End Its Broadway Run". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  259. ^ a b The Broadway League. "A Christmas Carol – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved September 7, 2022.
    "A Christmas Carol (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 2022)". Playbill. September 7, 2022. Retrieved September 27, 2022.
  260. ^ a b Soloski, Alexis (November 21, 2022). "Review: In This Solo 'Christmas Carol,' the Night Is Never Silent". The New York Times. p. C3. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  261. ^ a b Culwell-Block, Logan (November 14, 2022). "See Tony Winner Jack O'Brien and the Cast of Shucked Get 'Corny' in Times Square". Playbill. Retrieved November 14, 2022.
  262. ^ a b Paulson, Michael (November 14, 2022). "'Shucked' Is Corny. It's Country. And It's Coming to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 14, 2022.
  263. ^ The Broadway League (December 23, 1921). "Trilby – Broadway Play – 1921 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on February 14, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Trilby (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1921)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  264. ^ ""Trilby" to Be Revived; Wilton Lackaye Again as Svengali at the National Next Thursday". The New York Times. December 15, 1921. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2022.
  265. ^ The Broadway League (December 28, 1925). "The Monkey Talks – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 10, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Monkey Talks (Broadway, Sam H. Harris Theatre, 1925)". Playbill. Archived from the original on May 9, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  266. ^ The Broadway League (May 27, 1935). "Seven Keys to Baldpate – Broadway Play – 1935 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 27, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Seven Keys to Baldpate (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1935)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  267. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (May 28, 1935). "THE PLAY; George M. Cohan's 'Seven Keys to Baldpate' for the Players' Spring Revival". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  268. ^ The Broadway League (May 25, 1936). "The County Chairman – Broadway Play – 1936 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The County Chairman (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1936)". Playbill. Archived from the original on December 9, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  269. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (May 26, 1936). "THE PLAY; George Ade's 'The County Chairman' Put On as The Players Annual Revival". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  270. ^ The Broadway League (March 30, 1937). "Red Harvest – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 3, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Red Harvest (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1937)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  271. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 31, 1937). "The Play; ' Red Harvest,' From a Diary of the Red Cross at the Front During the War". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on April 30, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  272. ^ The Broadway League (December 16, 1936). "Brother Rat – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 23, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Brother Rat (Broadway, Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 1936)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on December 25, 2021. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
  273. ^ The Broadway League (November 11, 1937). "Julius Caesar – Broadway Play – 1937 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 27, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Julius Caesar (Broadway, Artef Theatre, 1937)". Playbill. Archived from the original on May 26, 2020. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  274. ^ The Broadway League (January 1, 1938). "The Shoemakers' Holiday – Broadway Play – 1938 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 27, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Shoemaker's Holiday (Broadway, Artef Theatre, 1938)". Playbill. Archived from the original on May 26, 2020. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  275. ^ The Broadway League (October 5, 1940). "Journey to Jerusalem – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 4, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Journey to Jerusalem (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1940)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 9, 2020. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  276. ^ The Broadway League (November 26, 1940). "The Corn Is Green – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 19, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Corn Is Green (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1940)". Playbill. Archived from the original on December 18, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  277. ^ The Broadway League (April 21, 1942). "Billy the Kid – Broadway Special – 1942 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 27, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Billy the Kid (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1942)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  278. ^ Martin, John (April 22, 1942). "Loring Presents His Dance Players; New Group Seen in 'The Man From Midian' at Debut Here in National Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  279. ^ "Warnow Musical Opening Tonight; 'What's Up' to Make Bow at the National -- Jimmy Savo, Gloria Warren in Cast". The New York Times. November 11, 1943. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  280. ^ The Broadway League (January 25, 1944). "The Cherry Orchard – Broadway Play – 1944 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 25, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Cherry Orchard (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1944)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  281. ^ The Broadway League (October 17, 1945). "The Assassin – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Assassin (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1945)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  282. ^ Nichols, Lewis (October 18, 1945). "THE PLAY in Review; 'The Assassin,' Based on the Murder of Admiral Darlan, Has Its American Premiere Here at the National Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  283. ^ The Broadway League (November 22, 1945). "The Day Before Spring – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on February 22, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Day Before Spring (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1945)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on November 29, 2020. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
  284. ^ The Broadway League (April 18, 1946). "Call Me Mister – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 17, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Call Me Mister (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1946)". Playbill. Archived from the original on January 14, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  285. ^ The Broadway League (September 22, 1947). "Anna Lucasta – Broadway Play – 1947 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 27, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Anna Lucasta (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Archived from the original on February 9, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  286. ^ The Broadway League (October 20, 1947). "Medea – Broadway Play – 1947 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 19, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Medea (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 9, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  287. ^ The Broadway League (December 22, 1947). "Crime and Punishment – Broadway Play – 1947 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 27, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Crime and Punishment (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Archived from the original on December 9, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  288. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (December 23, 1947). "At the Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  289. ^ The Broadway League (February 20, 1948). "Tonight at 8:30 – Broadway Play – 1948 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Tonight at 8:30 (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1948)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  290. ^ Zolotow, Sam (February 20, 1948). "Coward Revival Arrives Tonight; Gertrude Lawrence, Graham Payn Will Have Lead Roles in 'Tonight at 8:30'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  291. ^ The Broadway League (March 31, 1948). "Macbeth – Broadway Play – 1948 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 27, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Macbeth (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1948)". Playbill. Archived from the original on May 20, 2016. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  292. ^ The Broadway League (April 22, 1952). "Candida – Broadway Play – 1952 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on October 19, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Candida (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1952)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  293. ^ The Broadway League (January 20, 1953). "The Bat – Broadway Play – 1953 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Bat (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1953)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 22, 2020. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  294. ^ The Broadway League (February 13, 1957). "The Tunnel of Love – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 20, 2021. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "The Tunnel of Love (Broadway, Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, 1957)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on January 12, 2022. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
  295. ^ The Broadway League (February 5, 1958). "Winesburg, Ohio – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
    "Winesburg, Ohio (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1958)". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 16, 2022.
  296. ^ The Broadway League (January 27, 1962). "A Family Affair – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on February 27, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "A Family Affair (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1962)". Playbill. August 26, 2017. Archived from the original on May 25, 2020. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  297. ^ The Broadway League (October 19, 1965). "The Right Honourable Gentleman – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on October 27, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "The Right Honourable Gentleman (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1965)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on November 20, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  298. ^ The Broadway League (October 27, 1966). "Threepenny Opera – Broadway Musical – 1966 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 29, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Threepenny Opera (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1966)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on February 9, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  299. ^ The Broadway League (November 9, 1966). "The Rose Tattoo – Broadway Play – 1966 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 14, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "The Rose Tattoo (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1966)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on November 20, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  300. ^ The Broadway League (October 19, 1967). "Mirele Efros – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Mirele Efros (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1967)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on July 14, 2019. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  301. ^ The Broadway League (November 16, 1967). "Mother Courage and Her Children – Broadway Play – 1967 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Mother Courage and Her Children (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1967)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 16, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  302. ^ The Broadway League (March 3, 1968). "Here's Where I Belong – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 10, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Here's Where I Belong (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1968)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on October 1, 2020. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  303. ^ The Broadway League (May 1, 1968). "Soldiers – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 29, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Soldiers (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1968)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on April 4, 2019. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  304. ^ The Broadway League (September 30, 1968). "Box / Quotations From Chairman Mao Tse-Tung – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on February 28, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Box / Quotations from Chairman Mao Tse-Tung (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1968)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 16, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  305. ^ The Broadway League (October 2, 1968). "The Death of Bessie Smith / The American Dream – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on February 15, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "The Death of Bessie Smith / The American Dream (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1968)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  306. ^ The Broadway League (October 9, 1968). "Krapp's Last Tape / The Zoo Story – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 27, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Krapp's Last Tape / The Zoo Story (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1968)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  307. ^ The Broadway League (October 12, 1968). "Happy Days – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 10, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Happy Days (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1968)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on May 25, 2020. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  308. ^ The Broadway League (December 22, 1968). "The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui – Broadway Play – 1968 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 1, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Arturo Ui (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1968)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  309. ^ The Broadway League (March 15, 1972). "The Country Girl – Broadway Play – 1972 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on February 22, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "The Country Girl (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1972)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on December 6, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  310. ^ The Broadway League (December 27, 1972). "Purlie – Broadway Musical – 1972 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on January 22, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Purlie (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1972)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on February 25, 2020. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  311. ^ The Broadway League (December 19, 1973). "The Three Sisters – Broadway Play – 1973 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 10, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "The Three Sisters (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1973)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on February 9, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  312. ^ The Broadway League (December 22, 1973). "The Beggar's Opera – Broadway Musical – 1973 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on June 10, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "The Beggar's Opera (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1973)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 16, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  313. ^ The Broadway League (December 26, 1973). "Measure for Measure – Broadway Play – 1973 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 30, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Measure for Measure (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1973)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 16, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  314. ^ The Broadway League (December 28, 1973). "Scapin – Broadway Play – 1973 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 25, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Les Fourberies De Scapin (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1973)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  315. ^ Barnes, Clive (April 23, 1974). "Stage: Stoppard's Murder Play About Philosophy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  316. ^ The Broadway League (December 7, 1982). "84 Charing Cross Road – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 18, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "84 Charing Cross Road (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1982)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on February 21, 2020. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  317. ^ Rich, Frank (December 8, 1982). "Stage: '84 Charing Cross Road' Opens". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  318. ^ The Broadway League (November 10, 1983). "Amen Corner – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on April 3, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Amen Corner (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1983)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on June 18, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  319. ^ Rich, Frank (November 11, 1983). "Theater: 'Amen Corner,' Musical Set in Harlem". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  320. ^ The Broadway League (February 21, 1985). "Strange Interlude – Broadway Play – 1985 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on December 2, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Strange Interlude (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1985)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on April 24, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  321. ^ Rich, Frank (February 22, 1985). "Theater: a Fresh Look for O'Neill's 'Interlude'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 11, 2022.
  322. ^ The Broadway League (June 25, 1986). "Robert Klein on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on November 8, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Robert Klein on Broadway (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1986)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on January 16, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  323. ^ The Broadway League (October 16, 1986). "Raggedy Ann – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on October 30, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
    "Raggedy Ann (Broadway, Nederlander Theatre, 1986)". Playbill. December 14, 2015. Archived from the original on March 12, 2022. Retrieved June 15, 2022.
  324. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 184; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 145.
  325. ^ McKinley, Jesse (November 29, 2005). "Arts, Briefly; Big Week for 'Rent' On Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  326. ^ Ku, Andrew. "Broadway Grosses: April 9–15". Playbill. Archived from the original on June 30, 2012. Retrieved June 12, 2012.
  327. ^ "INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Weekly Grosses Analysis - 4/16; NEWSIES, MAMMA MIA! & MORMON". Broadwayworld.com. April 16, 2012. Archived from the original on November 6, 2014. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  328. ^ "WAR PAINT Broadway Grosses - 2017". www.broadwayworld.com. Archived from the original on October 29, 2018. Retrieved April 16, 2018.
  329. ^ "Production Gross". Playbill. Archived from the original on December 5, 2021. Retrieved April 29, 2021.

Sources