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Nemonapride
Nemonapride.svg
Clinical data
Trade namesEmilace (JP)
AHFS/Drugs.comInternational Drug Names
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
  • Rx-only (JP)
Identifiers
  • N-(1-benzyl-2-methylpyrrolidin-3-yl)-5-chloro-2-methoxy-4-(methylamino)benzamide
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
PDB ligand
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC21H26ClN3O2
Molar mass387.91 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • CC1C(CCN1CC2=CC=CC=C2)NC(=O)C3=CC(=C(C=C3OC)NC)Cl
  • InChI=1S/C21H26ClN3O2/c1-14-18(9-10-25(14)13-15-7-5-4-6-8-15)24-21(26)16-11-17(22)19(23-2)12-20(16)27-3/h4-8,11-12,14,18,23H,9-10,13H2,1-3H3,(H,24,26)
  • Key:KRVOJOCLBAAKSJ-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  (verify)

Nemonapride (エミレース, Emilace (JP)) is an atypical antipsychotic approved in Japan for the treatment of schizophrenia. It was launched by Yamanouchi in May 1991.[1] Nemonapride acts as a D2 and D3 receptor antagonist, and is also a potent 5-HT1A receptor agonist.[2] It has affinity for sigma receptors.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Safety Information No. 265" (PDF). Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency. January 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 July 2022. Retrieved 26 July 2022.
  2. ^ Kusumi I, Boku S, Takahashi Y (May 2015). "Psychopharmacology of atypical antipsychotic drugs: From the receptor binding profile to neuroprotection and neurogenesis". Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences. Wiley. 69 (5): 243–258. doi:10.1111/pcn.12242. PMID 25296946. S2CID 23102204.