Neodymium(III) sulfate[1]

Neodymium sulfate crystals
Names
IUPAC name
Neodymium(III) trisulfate
Other names
  • Neodyous sulfate
Identifiers
  • 13477-91-3
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.030.225 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 233-262-1
UNII
  • InChI=1S/2Nd.3H2O4S/c;;3*1-5(2,3)4/h;;3*(H2,1,2,3,4)/q2*+3;;;/p-6
    Key: OJSWEKSDNUORPG-UHFFFAOYSA-H
  • [O-]S(=O)(=O)[O-].[O-]S(=O)(=O)[O-].[O-]S(=O)(=O)[O-].[Nd+3].[Nd+3]
Properties
Nd2(SO4)3
Molar mass 576.7 g/mol
Appearance Pink crystals
Density 2.85 g/cm3
Melting point 1,176 °C (2,149 °F; 1,449 K)
8 g/100 ml (20 °C)
Solubility Soluble in mineral acids
Structure
Monoclinic
Explosive data
Shock sensitivity Not explosive
Friction sensitivity Not explosive
Hazards
Main hazards Irritant
GHS pictograms
H315, H319, H335
P261, P280, P304, P340, P305+351+338, P405, P501
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
1
0
1
Flash point Not flammable
Not flammable
Related compounds
Other anions
Neodymium nitrate
Other cations
Praseodymium(III) sulfate
Related compounds
Neodymium sulfate octahydrate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Neodymium(III) sulfate is a salt of the rare earth metal neodymium when mixed with sulfuric acid. Its octahydrate forms violet-red crystals. It is moderately soluble in water and has a monoclinic crystal structure. It can be used to treat water but because of its rarity, it is not used that way.

Preparation

Neodymium sulfate is produced by dissolving neodymium metal in sulfuric acid.[2]

Uses

It is used in glass for extremely powerful lasers. It can be used to treat water but is not used because of its rarity.

References