The Oktibbeha County School District was a public school district serving rural communities in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi (USA). The district administrative offices were in Starkville.[1] It is now a part of the Starkville-Oktibbeha Consolidated School District, effective July 1, 2015.[2]

History

In the 1960s and 70s, the school districts were reconfigured so that most of the areas surrounding Starkville were grouped into the Starkville School District (SSD). This resulted in a situation where the population of the OCSD had a median income of around half that of the SSD,[3] and was over 90% black.[4] Prior to 1970, black students from Sturgis were bused to Maben.[5] One day before the schools were integrated in February of 1970, a black school in Maben was burned.[6]

The district served most of Maben and the town of Sturgis in the West Oktibbeha County Elementary (Pre-K-6) and High School (7-12) as well as several communities in the western parts of the county not in the Starkville City School District. The East Oktibbeha County Elementary (K-6) and High School (7-12) served the communities in the eastern parts of Oktibbeha county not included in the Starkville City School District.[7] OCSD was taken over the state twice due to academic failure and mismanagement, and the state proposed several times that it should be merged with the SSD. In 2013, the Mississippi Legislature passed a bill requiring that all Oktibbeha County schools be merged into the Starkville School District. In the implementation of this plan, East Oktibbeha Elementary was closed because its location would have resulted in a school that was over 90% black.[8] The district was dissolved under Mississippi law on July 1, 2015.[9]

Schools

Schools closed prior to the district's consolidation:

Demographics

2019-2020 school year

2006-07 school year

There were a total of 876 students enrolled in the Oktibbeha County School District during the 2006-2007 school year. The gender makeup of the district was 51% female and 49% male. The racial makeup of the district was 91.55% African American, 8.33% White, and 0.11% Asian.[11] 82.7% of the district's students were eligible to receive free lunch.[12]

Previous school years

School Year Enrollment Gender Makeup Racial Makeup
Female Male Asian African
American
Hispanic Native
American
White
2005-06[11] 833 50% 50% 91.36% 8.64%
2004-05[11] 871 50% 50% 89.09% 10.91%
2003-04[11] 922 48% 52% 89.15% 10.85%
2002-03[13] 1,029 46% 54% 87.95% 0.10% 11.95%

Accountability statistics

2006-07[14] 2005-06[15] 2004-05[16] 2003-04[17] 2002-03[18]
District Accreditation Status Accredited Accredited Accredited Advised Probation
School Performance Classifications
Level 5 (Superior Performing) Schools 0 0 0 0 0
Level 4 (Exemplary) Schools 0 1 0 1 1
Level 3 (Successful) Schools 3 1 1 2 0
Level 2 (Under Performing) Schools 1 2 2 1 3
Level 1 (Low Performing) Schools 0 0 1 0 1
Not Assigned 0 0 0 0 0

See also

References

  1. ^ Home page. Oktibbeha County School District. March 10, 2015. Retrieved on July 3, 2017. "106 West Main Street, Starkville, MS 39759"
  2. ^ "School District Consolidation in Mississippi Archived 2017-07-02 at the Wayback Machine." Mississippi Professional Educators. December 2016. Retrieved on July 2, 2017. Page 2 (PDF p. 3/6).
  3. ^ Lewis, Nicole. "What happens when two separate and unequal school districts merge? Forced to consolidate, two school districts in rural Mississippi reimagine desegregation". Retrieved 28 November 2017.
  4. ^ Grant, Richard (19 July 2016). "Starkville school merger: What went right?". Retrieved 28 November 2017.
  5. ^ "CONGRESSIONAL RECORD- HOUSE" (PDF). April 14, 1970. p. 11647. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  6. ^ "CONGRESSIONAL RECORD - SENATE" (PDF). May 12, 1970. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  7. ^ Official Website for Oktibbeha County School District, http://www.oktibbeha.k12.ms.us/ Archived 2002-09-29 at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ "COMMISSION RELEASES PROPOSED PLAN FOR CONSOLIDATION STRUCTURE". Starkville, MS. Archived from the original on 4 February 2014. Retrieved 5 February 2014.
  9. ^ "Senate Bill 2818 (As Sent to Governor)". Mississippi Legislature. Retrieved 2021-08-10. On July 1, 2015, following the motion of State Board of Education to consolidate school districts in Oktibbeha County, the Oktibbeha County School District shall be abolished.
  10. ^ Home page. Oktibbeha County School District. September 29, 2002. Retrieved on July 3, 2017.
  11. ^ a b c d "Mississippi Assessment and Accountability Reporting System". Office of Research and Statistics, Mississippi Department of Education. Archived from the original on 2007-03-23.
  12. ^ "2006-07 State, District, and School Enrollment by Race/Gender with Poverty Data" (XLS). Mississippi Department of Education. 2008-01-16. Retrieved 2008-05-18.[dead link]
  13. ^ "Mississippi Report Card for 2002-2003". Office of Educational Accountability, Mississippi Department of Education. 2004-09-02. Archived from the original on 2007-08-12. Retrieved 2007-08-31.
  14. ^ "2007 Results" (PDF). Mississippi Statewide Accountability System. Mississippi Department of Education. 2007-09-13. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-11-27. Retrieved 2007-09-15.
  15. ^ "2006 Results" (PDF). Mississippi Statewide Accountability System. Mississippi Department of Education. 2006-09-06. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-02-17. Retrieved 2007-06-14.
  16. ^ "2005 Results" (PDF). Mississippi Statewide Accountability System. Mississippi Department of Education. 2005-09-09. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-07-05. Retrieved 2007-06-14.
  17. ^ "2004 Results" (PDF). Mississippi Statewide Accountability System. Mississippi Department of Education. 2004-09-26. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-07-05. Retrieved 2007-06-14.
  18. ^ "2003 Results" (PDF). Mississippi Statewide Accountability System. Mississippi Department of Education. 2003-11-21. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-07-05. Retrieved 2007-06-14.