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Oroquieta
City of Oroquieta
Flag of Oroquieta
Official seal of Oroquieta
Nickname: 
City of Good Life
Map of Misamis Occidental with Oroquieta highlighted
Map of Misamis Occidental with Oroquieta highlighted
OpenStreetMap
Map
Oroquieta is located in Philippines
Oroquieta
Oroquieta
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 8°29′N 123°48′E / 8.48°N 123.8°E / 8.48; 123.8
CountryPhilippines
RegionNorthern Mindanao
ProvinceMisamis Occidental
District 1st district
Founded1880
CityhoodJanuary 1, 1970
Barangays47 (see Barangays)
Government
[1]
 • TypeSangguniang Panlungsod
 • MayorLemuel Meyrick M. Acosta (NP)
 • Vice MayorAurora Virginia M. Almonte (NP)
 • RepresentativeJason P. Almonte (PDP-Laban)
 • City Council
Members
 • Electorate54,839 voters (2022)
Area
 • Total237.88 km2 (91.85 sq mi)
Elevation
138 m (453 ft)
Highest elevation
1,925 m (6,316 ft)
Lowest elevation
0 m (0 ft)
Population
 (2020 census)[3]
 • Total72,301
 • Density300/km2 (790/sq mi)
 • Households
17,326
DemonymOroquietanon
Economy
 • Income class4th city income class
 • Poverty incidence
20.48
% (2021)[4]
 • Revenue₱ 700.7 million (2020)
 • Assets₱ 2,063 million (2020)
 • Expenditure₱ 500.7 million (2020)
 • Liabilities₱ 379.5 million (2020)
Service provider
 • ElectricityMisamis Occidental 1 Electric Cooperative (MOELCI 1)
Time zoneUTC+8 (PST)
ZIP code
7207
PSGC
IDD:area code+63 (0)88
Native languagesSubanon
Cebuano
Tagalog
Catholic dioceseArchdiocese of Ozamis
Patron saintOur Lady of Holy Rosary
Websitewww.oroquietacity.gov.ph

Oroquieta,(formerly/originally known as Layawan), officially the City of Oroquieta (Cebuano: Dakbayan sa Oroquieta; Tagalog: Lungsod ng Oroquieta), is a 4th class component city and capital of the province of Misamis Occidental, Philippines. According to the 2020 census, it has a population of 72,301 people.[3]

Etymology

Some sources reveal that the town got its name from the barrio in Spain where Father Tomás Casado, the first parish priest, and General Domingo Moriones y Murillo, a hero in the Battle of Oroquieta, were born.[citation needed]

Another version is that Oroquieta had derived its name from the words oro (gold) and quita or kita (to find), in reference to the early inhabitants who had found gold along the river.

History

Layawan was the original name of Oroquieta, which was a barrio in the province of Misamis since 1861 until 1879. The early settlers then of the barrio were Boholanos. They found so many stray animals along the river, thus they named the place Layawan, which means a place of stray animals. A little later, Misamis was divided into two provinces, Misamis Occidental and Oriental. Then in 1880, Layawan changed its name to Oroquieta when it became a town.

At the time of the American occupation, the territory was retained by 1903 when the number of municipalities in the then-undivided Misamis decreased through Act No. 951, issued on October 21;[5] but was reduced by Executive Order No. 67, series of 1916, issued by Governor-General Francis Burton Harrison, where four barrios were organized into the new municipality of Aloran.[6]

Oroquieta became the capital (cabecera) on January 6, 1930. As capital town, people of various neighboring provinces came and inhabited in the place where they earn their living through fishing, farming, merchandising and other forms of businesses. Soon afterwards its income increased simultaneously with increase in population, resulting from southward migration from Luzon and Visayas to the area.

In 1942, Oroquieta was made the capital of the free Philippines by the recognized guerrillas and later the ongoing troops of the Philippine Commonwealth Army. (Personal interview with the late Atty. Vicente Blanco, Municipal Mayor during the Japanese Occupation) During this time, President Manuel L. Quezon, together with Sergio Osmeña Sr., a bodyguard and Major Manuel Nieto Sr., landed in Oroquieta after their evacuation from Corregidor to Australia.

The seat of government of the Free Philippines then was the Capitol. The Free Philippine Government was then issuing Misamis Occidental emergency notes. President Quezon, upon knowing that Oroquieta was made a capital of the Free Philippines and that the town was issuing emergency notes, authorized the Printing of the Mindanao emergency note.

Cityhood

Main article: Cities of the Philippines

Oroquieta was created a city under Republic Act 5518 and inaugurated as a chartered city on January 1, 1970. The charter converting the municipality of Oroquieta into a city were signed by President Marcos on June 25, 1969, in the presence of the then City Mayor Ciriaco C. Pastrano, with the newly elected councilors and other city officials.

Geography

Oroquieta City is bounded on the south by Aloran and the north by Lopez Jaena. On the eastern side is Iligan Bay, with Concepcion on the southwest and Sapang Dalaga on the northwest. Lowland plains and coastal lowlands are located in the city's eastern side while highlands and mountains tower over its western side.

The city occupies roughly 26,393 hectares (65,220 acres), the majority of which comprises the mountain barangays of Mialen, Toliyok, and Sebucal, averaging less than a thousand hectares per Barangay, the 47 barangays of the City outsize its urbanized counterparts.

Climate

Climate data for Oroquieta City, Misamis Occidental
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Mean daily maximum °C (°F) 28
(82)
28
(82)
29
(84)
31
(88)
31
(88)
30
(86)
30
(86)
30
(86)
30
(86)
30
(86)
29
(84)
28
(82)
30
(85)
Mean daily minimum °C (°F) 23
(73)
23
(73)
23
(73)
23
(73)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
23
(73)
24
(74)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 69
(2.7)
44
(1.7)
37
(1.5)
29
(1.1)
87
(3.4)
137
(5.4)
131
(5.2)
141
(5.6)
143
(5.6)
134
(5.3)
68
(2.7)
53
(2.1)
1,073
(42.3)
Average rainy days 9.9 7.6 7.4 8.1 21.6 26.5 26.4 26.6 25.8 24.3 15.1 10.4 209.7
Source: Meteoblue (modeled/calculated data, not measured locally)[7]

Barangays

Oroquieta City is politically subdivided into 47 barangays. Each barangay consists of puroks while some have sitios.

Demographics

Population census of Oroquieta
YearPop.±% p.a.
1903 15,156—    
1918 18,014+1.16%
1939 21,523+0.85%
1948 22,837+0.66%
1960 29,477+2.15%
YearPop.±% p.a.
1970 38,575+2.72%
1975 42,497+1.96%
1980 47,328+2.18%
1990 52,500+1.04%
1995 56,012+1.22%
YearPop.±% p.a.
2000 59,843+1.43%
2007 65,349+1.22%
2010 68,945+1.97%
2015 70,757+0.50%
2020 72,301+0.43%
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[8][9][10][11]

According to the 2020 census, it has a population of 72,301 people,[3] with a density of 300 inhabitants per square kilometre or 780 inhabitants per square mile.

Economy

Poverty incidence of Oroquieta

10
20
30
40
2006
33.50
2009
30.65
2012
22.24
2015
20.92
2018
15.55
2021
20.48

Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19]

The groundbreaking ceremony and construction of the first mall in Oroquieta City was started in April 2024. The mall is located in Purok 1, Villaflor.

Also Starlite Ferries, a maritime company under the Chelsea Logistics Groups marked its 4th route when it officially opened the new route connecting Oroquieta City to Larena, Tagbilaran, and Cebu, and vice versa on April 28. The Starlite Ferries are stationed at the San Vicente Bajo Port in Oroquieta City.

A Jollibee franchise is located along Oroquieta Highway in a former Shell gasoline station at the city center, with double drive-thru, the first in the Visayas and Mindanao region. Other national and international brands that invested in the city are Robinsons Supermarket, Watsons, Mercury Drug, 7-Eleven Convenience Store, Prince Warehouse Supermarket, Mang Inasal, among others.

Government

Oroquieta City Council (2022-2025):

Oroquieta City Council (2019-2022):

Healthcare

Hospitals and healthcare facilities:

Education

Students coming from Lanao del Norte, Zamboanga del Sur, Zamboanga del Norte and Misamis Occidental come to Oroquieta to pursue their college education.

Universities and colleges:

Secondary schools:

Notable personalities

See also

Notes

  1. ^ City of Oroquieta | (DILG)
  2. ^ "2015 Census of Population, Report No. 3 – Population, Land Area, and Population Density" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority. Quezon City, Philippines. August 2016. ISSN 0117-1453. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 25, 2021. Retrieved July 16, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c Census of Population (2020). "Region X (Northern Mindanao)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved July 8, 2021.
  4. ^ "PSA Releases the 2021 City and Municipal Level Poverty Estimates". Philippine Statistics Authority. April 2, 2024. Retrieved April 28, 2024.
  5. ^ "Act No. 951". jurisprudence.ph. October 21, 1903. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  6. ^ "Index to Official Gazette (1913–1928)" (PDF). University of San Carlos. 2011–2012. Retrieved July 31, 2022 – via The Library Corporation.
  7. ^ "Oroquieta: Average Temperatures and Rainfall". Meteoblue. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  8. ^ Census of Population (2015). "Region X (Northern Mindanao)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  9. ^ Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Region X (Northern Mindanao)" (PDF). Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. National Statistics Office. Retrieved June 29, 2016.
  10. ^ Censuses of Population (1903–2007). "Region X (Northern Mindanao)". Table 1. Population Enumerated in Various Censuses by Province/Highly Urbanized City: 1903 to 2007. National Statistics Office.((cite encyclopedia)): CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  11. ^ "Province of Misamis Occidental". Municipality Population Data. Local Water Utilities Administration Research Division. Retrieved December 17, 2016.
  12. ^ "Poverty incidence (PI):". Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  13. ^ "Estimation of Local Poverty in the Philippines" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority. November 29, 2005.
  14. ^ "2003 City and Municipal Level Poverty Estimates" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority. March 23, 2009.
  15. ^ "City and Municipal Level Poverty Estimates; 2006 and 2009" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority. August 3, 2012.
  16. ^ "2012 Municipal and City Level Poverty Estimates" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority. May 31, 2016.
  17. ^ "Municipal and City Level Small Area Poverty Estimates; 2009, 2012 and 2015". Philippine Statistics Authority. July 10, 2019.
  18. ^ "PSA Releases the 2018 Municipal and City Level Poverty Estimates". Philippine Statistics Authority. December 15, 2021. Retrieved January 22, 2022.
  19. ^ "PSA Releases the 2021 City and Municipal Level Poverty Estimates". Philippine Statistics Authority. April 2, 2024. Retrieved April 28, 2024.