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Otterbein University
Otterbein University logo.png
Former names
Otterbein University
(1847–1917; 2010–present)
Otterbein College (1917–2010)
TypePrivate university
Established1847; 175 years ago (1847)
Religious affiliation
United Methodist
Endowment$99.1 million (2020)[1]
PresidentJohn Comerford
Academic staff
328
Undergraduates2,342 (Fall 2014)[2]
Postgraduates449 (Fall 2014)[2]
Location,
U.S.
Campus140 acres (57 ha)[3]
Colors    Tan and Cardinal
NicknameCardinals
Sporting affiliations
NCAA Division IIIOAC
MascotCardy the Cardinal
Websitewww.otterbein.edu

Otterbein University is a private university in Westerville, Ohio. It offers 74 majors and 44 minors as well as eight graduate programs.[4] The university was founded in 1847 by the Church of the United Brethren in Christ and named for United Brethren founder the Rev. Philip William Otterbein. As a result of a division and two mergers involving the church, it has been associated since 1968 with the United Methodist Church. In 2010, its name was changed back from Otterbein College to Otterbein University because of an increasing number of graduate and undergraduate programs.[5]

It is primarily an undergraduate institution with approximately 2,300 undergraduate and 450 graduate students on the campus.[2] Otterbein has over 100 student organizations and a popular Greek presence. The school's mascot is Cardy the Cardinal and the school is a member of the Ohio Athletic Conference in NCAA Division III athletics.[6]

History

Towers Hall
Towers Hall

Otterbein University was founded in 1847 by the Church of the United Brethren in Christ. As a result of a division and two mergers involving the church, the university has since 1968 been associated with the United Methodist Church. The university is named for United Brethren founder, Philip William Otterbein.[7]

In 1859, Otterbein enrolled its first African-American student, William Hannibal Thomas, but he was beaten and taunted by white students. The university told him his continued enrollment "imperiled the very existence of the school" and said it would expel him if he did not withdraw voluntarily, which he did after 10 weeks.[8] Otterbein did not grant a degree to a Black student until 1893.[9]

Campus

The Otterbein campus is located in Westerville, Ohio. It sits between Alum Creek on the west and State Street (Ohio State Route 3) on the east. West Home Street, which runs through the center of campus, is the address of most of the college's homes and student residence halls (such as 25 [Suite Style Residence], Mayne Hall, Hanby Hall, 163 W. Home Street, and Clements Hall),[10] as well as the Campus Center. The north end of the campus is home to most underclassman housing, the health and physical education department, athletic facilities, as well as the Clements Recreation Center. Overall, the Campus occupies 140 acres (0.57 km2).[11]

Academics

Otterbein requires students to take a broad variety of courses.[12] It offers B.A., B.S., B.F.A., B.Mus., B.M.E., B.S.E., B.S.N., MAE, MBA, MSN and DNP degrees in 74 majors and 41 minors.[13] Since Fall 2011, the university has run on the semester calendar. Otterbein University's graduate school features programs in business administration (MBA), nursing (MSN, DNP), education, Educational mathematics, and science in allied health.

School of Art & Sciences

The School of Arts and Sciences houses departments and programs in: art, biological science, biochemistry & molecular biology, chemistry, communications, earth science, English, English as a second language, history, mathematical sciences, modern languages & cultures, music, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, religion, sociology & anthropology, and theatre & dance. Otterbein also has programs in theatre, dance, music, and film. Twenty-eight percent of Otterbein students study abroad. The university sponsors semester-long programs in four locations—London, England; Barbados; Paris, France; and Madrid, Spain—and several short-term summer programs in locations such as Nicaragua, all of which are staffed by Otterbein professors. Students can also choose to study in a variety of other countries through alternative providers.

School of Professional Studies

The School of Professional Studies houses departments and programs in business, accounting & economics, education, engineering, equine science, health & sports sciences, and nursing.

Rankings and admission

In its 2012 edition of "America's Best Colleges", Otterbein was ranked 14th in the "Regional Universities (Midwest)" category by U.S. News & World Report.[14] U.S. News & World Report classifies its selectivity as "more selective."[15] In its 2018 edition of "America's Best Colleges", Otterbein was ranked #19(tie) in "Regional Universities (Midwest)" category, #12(tie) in "Best Colleges for Veterans" category, and #35 in "Best Value Schools" category by U.S. News & World Report.[16] Schools are ranked according to their performance across a set of widely accepted indicators of excellence. Other awards include: President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for 6 straight years.[17]

Music program

The Department of Music at Otterbein offers the degrees of Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education, and Bachelor of Arts in a number of majors including music business, music history and literature, jazz studies, and general music studies. The music program at Otterbein includes many diverse ensembles of different sizes, as well as an opera theatre program. The touring ensembles are Concert Choir, Symphonic Band, and String Orchestra, which tour nationally and internationally. Other ensembles include Marching Band, Opus One vocal jazz, Cardinal Singers (formerly Women's Chorale), Vox Otterbein (formerly Men's Chorus), Otterbein Singers, The Anticipations rock cover band, Jazz Combo, Early Music, and Red Noise, the new music ensemble. The music department is housed in Battelle Fine Arts Center. Graduates go on to teach music in K-12 schools, perform in professional opera, symphony orchestras, and bands, compose music, and teach privately.

Theatre and art program

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Professional training is offered in the areas of Acting, Design/Technology, and Musical Theatre with BFA degrees offered in all three programs and a dance concentration in the latter. A BA degree in Theatre is also available, which allows students to tailor the major to suit interests in directing, writing, and stage management among others. In addition, the department offers a dance minor. Otterbein University Theatre and Otterbein Summer Theatre stage nine shows a year. Plays range from classical Shakespearean dramas and British comedies to full-scale musicals and experimental works. The department also presents an annual dance concert designed by many of the university's choreographers. Three galleries show art by students, faculty and guest artists, as well as pieces from Otterbein's permanent collection.

Athletics

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The Otterbein Cardinals compete in NCAA Division III, as a member of the Ohio Athletic Conference. Otterbein's traditional opponents include: Baldwin Wallace University, Capital University, Heidelberg University, John Carroll University, Marietta College, University of Mount Union, Muskingum University, Ohio Northern University, and Wilmington College. They sponsor ten men's and nine women's varsity sports, including:

Greek life

Otterbein's history of social Greek organizations dates back to 1908, when members of the debate society started Pi Beta Sigma Fraternity, with Sigma Alpha Tau Sorority being founded in 1910. 12 of the 14 Greek chapters on campus are local, meaning they were founded and exist only at Otterbein. There are six sororities and eight fraternities at Otterbein; all six sororities are local, while six fraternities are local and two are national. Within their Greek Life they have two of the oldest independent chapters in the United States, Pi Beta Sigma and Pi Kappa Phi (not connected to the national Pi Kappa Phi).

Panhellenic Sororities at Otterbein:

IntraFraternity Council Fraternities at Otterbein:

Local:

National:

WOBN

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WOBN, whose frequency is 97.5 FM, is Otterbein's student-run radio station, playing college rock for Otterbein and surrounding Westerville. WOBN is the flagship of Otterbein Sports, covering many of the games for basketball, football, and baseball. WOBN has been operating since 1948.

Residence halls

Traditional residence halls

Suite style housing

Commons apartments

Theme houses

Theme houses are an on-campus living option for students with a common goal. Residents of each house are expected to create and take part in programming events to benefit the residents, the special interest group they represent, and the campus community. Any full-time sophomore, junior or senior Otterbein student in good standing with the university is eligible to live in a university-operated house.

Each house is advised by a university academic or administrative department which determines the selection process for students residing in the individual houses.

Houses are eligible for gender-inclusive housing, meaning students residing in the houses may determine if the house will be gender inclusive or single sex. All residents must agree to the status prior to signing an agreement to live in the house.

Current theme houses

[27]

Notable alumni

Main article: List of Otterbein University alumni

References

  1. ^ As of June 30, 2020. U.S. and Canadian Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year 2020 Endowment Market Value and Change in Endowment Market Value from FY19 to FY20 (Report). National Association of College and University Business Officers and TIAA. February 19, 2021. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  2. ^ a b c "Otterbein University in College Navigator". U.S. Department of Education. 2016. Retrieved May 11, 2016.
  3. ^ USNews.com America's Best Colleges 2007. Accessed 2007-03-09.
  4. ^ "About Otterbein".
  5. ^ "Otterbein Poised to Resume Name of Otterbein University". Retrieved June 14, 2010.
  6. ^ "Official Site of Otterbein University Athletics". www.otterbeincardinals.com. Retrieved August 23, 2017.
  7. ^ "Otterbein History". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved September 29, 2017.
  8. ^ John David Smith (2019). Black Judas: William Hannibal Thomas and the American Negro. ISBN 9780820356266. Retrieved September 17, 2021.
  9. ^ Baird, Laura (April 26, 2019). "The life and legacy of William Henry Fouse". CityScene Magazine. Retrieved September 17, 2021.
  10. ^ "Campus Addresses". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved August 23, 2017.
  11. ^ "About Otterbein University". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved August 23, 2017.
  12. ^ Otterbein College Integrative Studies. Accessed 2006-12-02.
  13. ^ "Information about Otterbein University". Otterbein University. Retrieved January 17, 2011.
  14. ^ http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/otterbein-university-3110[bare URL]
  15. ^ "OtterbeinUniversity | Best College | US News". Colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
  16. ^ "How Does Otterbein University Rank Among America's Best Colleges?". U.S. News & World Report. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  17. ^ "Otterbein University Recognized by President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for Sixth Year". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved August 23, 2017.
  18. ^ "Clements Hall". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  19. ^ "Davis Hall". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  20. ^ "Dunlap King Hall". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  21. ^ "Engle, Garst & Scott Halls (The Triad)". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  22. ^ "Mayne Hall". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  23. ^ "Hanby Hall". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  24. ^ "25 W. Home Street". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  25. ^ "DeVore Hall". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  26. ^ "Commons Apartments on Home Street and Park Street". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  27. ^ "Theme Houses". www.otterbein.edu. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  28. ^ "John Finley Williamson Collection". October 13, 2011. Archived from the original on August 14, 2014. Retrieved August 23, 2017.

Coordinates: 40°07′33″N 82°56′10″W / 40.12573°N 82.93613°W / 40.12573; -82.93613