The following outline is provides an overview of Sikhism, or Sikhi (its endonym).

Sikhism is a monotheistic religion—emphasizing universal selflessness and brotherhood—founded in the 15th century upon the teachings of Guru Nanak and the ten succeeding Gurus. It is the fifth-largest organized religion in the world,[1] and one of the fastest-growing.[2]

The sacred text and last Guru of Sikhism, Guru Granth Sahib, teaches humans how to unite with the all cosmic soul; with God, the creator: "Only those who selflessly love everyone, they alone shall find God."

Scripture and literature

See also: Category:Sikh scripture

Scripture

Sikh literature

See also: Category:Sikh literature

Associated terms

Philosophy and beliefs

Main article: Sikh philosophy

Relation to other religions

Practices and culture

Main pages: Sikh discipline and Category:Sikh practices

Sikh ceremonies

Sikh festivals

Main article: Sikh Festivals

General sikh culture

Sikh geography

Map of Ranjit Singh's empire at its peak.
Map of Ranjit Singh's empire at its peak.
Map of Punjab Province (British India), 1909
Harmandir Sahib (the Golden Temple) at night, in Amritsar, India
Harmandir Sahib (the Golden Temple) at night, in Amritsar, India

See also: Category:Sikh places

Sikhism by country

Main article: Sikh diaspora

Gurdwaras

Main pages: Gurdwara and Category:Gurdwaras

The Harmandir Sahib, Sikh Gurdwara and spiritual centre at Amritsar, India.
The Harmandir Sahib, Sikh Gurdwara and spiritual centre at Amritsar, India.
Nishan Sahib

In India

Main article: Gurdwaras in India

The Harmandir Sahib (or Golden Temple) is the holy shrine of Sikhs; the spiritual and cultural center of the Sikh religion, found in Amritsar. The Shiromani Gurudwara Parbandhak Committee (SGPC) is the organization responsible for the management of gurdwaras in the states of Punjab, Haryana, and Himachal Pradesh, and the union territory of Chandigarh

Other gurdwaras in India include:

In the United States

Main article: Gurdwaras in the United States

Gurdwaras in Pakistan

Main article: Gurdwaras in Pakistan

Other gurdwaras

Other Sikh institutions

Sikh politics, military, and administration

See also: Category:Sikh politics

Organizations

Ghadar Party flag

Military

Movements

History of Sikhism

Main pages: History of Sikhism, Category:History of Sikhism, and History of Punjab

Battles

People

Sikh man in turban
Sikh man in turban

Sikhs are members of the Sikh religion. A sangat is a society or congregation of Sikhs.

Titles and labels

Main article: Sikh titles

Sikh Gurus

Main article: Sikh gurus

Notable people

See also: List of Sikhs, Sikh Bhagats, Category:Sikh warriors, and Category:Sikh martyrs

General concepts

See also: Glossary of Sikhism

Pop culture

See also

References

  1. ^ Adherents.com. "Religions by adherents". Archived from the original on April 21, 2005. Retrieved 2007-02-09.((cite web)): CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  2. ^ "The List: The World's -Growing Religions". Foreign Policy. Foreign Policy. Archived from the original on 26 May 2012. Retrieved 5 November 2010.((cite news)): CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  3. ^ Singh, Pritama. 1992. Bhai Gurdas. pp. 33–36. ISBN 9788172012182.
  4. ^ Colonist, Times (2008-03-11). "Sikh separatists in Canada concern Indian government". Canada.com. Retrieved 2010-01-22.
  5. ^ "25 years on, few takers for Khalistan in Canada". Thaindian.com. Retrieved 2010-01-22.
  6. ^ The foreign policy of Pakistan: ethnic impacts on diplomacy, 1971–1994. ISBN 1-86064-169-5. Mehtab Ali Shah: "Such is the political, psychological and religious attachment of the Sikhs to that city that a Khalistan without Lahore would be like a Germany without Berlin."
  7. ^ Amritsar to Lahore: a journey across the India-Pakistan border. Stephen Alter. ISBN 0-8122-1743-8 "Ever since the separatist movement gathered force in the 1980s, Pakistan has sided with the Sikhs, even though the territorial ambitions of Khalistan include Lahore and sections of the Punjab on both sides of the border."
  8. ^ Surjit Singh Gandhi (2007). History of Sikh Gurus Retold: 1606-1708 C.E. Atlantic Publishers & Dist. p. 822. ISBN 9788126908585.
  9. ^ Surjit Singh Gandhi (2007). History of Sikh Gurus Retold: 1606-1708 C.E. Atlantic Publishers & Dist. p. 822. ISBN 9788126908585.
  10. ^ Mehta, J. L. (2005). Advanced study in the history of modern India 1707–1813. Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd. p. 303. ISBN 978-1-932705-54-6. Retrieved 2010-09-23.
  11. ^ Jacques, Tony (2007). Dictionary of Battles and Sieges. Greenwood Press. p. 92. ISBN 978-0-313-33536-5.
  12. ^ Jacques, p. 93
  13. ^ Guru Nanak may be referred to by many other names and titles such as "Satguru Nanak Dev", "Guru Nanak Dev" or "Baba Nanak" .
  14. ^ N. Jayapalan (2001). History of India. Atlantic. p. 160. ISBN 978-81-7156-928-1.
  15. ^ A Gateway to Sikhism | Sri Guru Tegh Bhadur Sahib J - A Gateway to Sikhism Archived 2008-08-30 at the Wayback Machine
  16. ^ Deol, Harnik (2000). Religion and Nationalism in India. Routledge. p. 62. ISBN 0-415-20108-X.
  17. ^ Keene, Michael (2003). Online Worksheets. Nelson Thornes. p. 38. ISBN 0-7487-7159-X.