Papua New Guinea
Cricket PNG logo.png
Cricket PNG logo
Nickname(s)Barramundis
AssociationCricket PNG
Personnel
CaptainAssad Vala
CoachItaly Carl Sandri[1]
International Cricket Council
ICC statusAssociate Member with ODI status (1973)
ICC regionEast Asia-Pacific
ICC Rankings Current[2] Best-ever
ODI 20th 17th
T20I 19th 15th (09-Sep-2016)
One Day Internationals
First ODIv.  Hong Kong at Tony Ireland Stadium, Townsville; 8 November 2014
Last ODIv.  Oman at Dubai International Cricket Stadium, Dubai; 16 April 2022
ODIs Played Won/Lost
Total[3] 45 10/35
(0 ties, 0 no result)
This year[4] 10 3/7
(0 ties, 0 no result)
World Cup Qualifier appearances10 (first in 1979)
Best result3rd (1982)
Twenty20 Internationals
First T20Iv.  Ireland at Stormont, Belfast; 15 July 2015
Last T20Iv.  United States at Bulawayo Athletic Club, Bulawayo; 17 July 2022
T20Is Played Won/Lost
Total[5] 43 21/21
(0 ties, 1 no result)
This year[6] 12 4/8
(0 ties, 0 no result)
T20 World Cup appearances1 (first in 2021)
Best resultFirst round (2021)
T20 World Cup Qualifier appearances4 (first in 2012)
Best resultRunner-ups (2019)
Kit left arm redborder.png
Kit right arm redborder.png

One-day kit

As of 17 July 2022

The Papua New Guinea national cricket team, nicknamed the Barramundis, is the team that represents the country of Papua New Guinea in international cricket. The team is organised by Cricket PNG, which has been an Associate Member of the International Cricket Council (ICC) since 1973.[7][8] Papua New Guinea previously had One-Day International (ODI) status, which it gained by finishing fourth in 2014 World Cup Qualifier.[9] Papua New Guinea lost both their ODI and T20I status in March 2018 after losing a playoff match against Nepal during the 2018 Cricket World Cup Qualifier, a result that earned ODI and T20I status for their opponents. On 26 April 2019, at the final World Cricket League 2 fixture; PNG defeated Oman to finish at the fourth position and reclaim their ODI status.[10]

Papua New Guinea is the strongest team in the ICC East Asia-Pacific region, winning most ICC regional tournaments and having a similar record in the cricket tournament at the Pacific Games.[8][11] The team has also played in every edition of the World Cup Qualifier (previously the ICC Trophy).[12] Papua New Guinea holds the world record for the highest score in a one-day match, making 572/7 against New Caledonia in 2007.[13]

In April 2018, the ICC decided to grant full Twenty20 International (T20I) status to all its Members. Therefore, all Twenty20 matches played between Papua New Guinea and other ICC members since 1 January 2019 have been a full T20I.[14]

History

Beginnings

Cricket was introduced to the Territory of Papua by missionaries in the 1890s, and the local population soon took up the game. Matches were not always played to strict rules, with teams of more than fifty players a common occurrence. Cricket did not arrive in the Territory of New Guinea until Australia took over the administration of the territory under a United Nations mandate.[8]

Cricket in rural areas tended to be played mostly by the indigenous population, whilst in urban areas such as Port Moresby the game was played mostly by the British and Australian expatriate population, and a competition for clubs in the city was started in 1937. A team of nine expatriate and two indigenous players played in Papua New Guinea's first international, against Australia[8] in 1972.[15]

Since its beginnings cricket was picked up naturally in the Motuan areas of Papua New Guinea, most recognisably the village of Hanuabada. Hanuabada village is located on the outer suburbs of Port Moresby, here cricket is played everyday from small children to their national stars, every afternoon the streets are flooded with boys playing cricket, this was also where the Liklik Kricket Competition was started in PNG. It may be for these reasons more than half of the PNG national cricket team is from Hanuabada village.

ICC Membership

Papua New Guinea became an associate member of the ICC in 1973,[16] shortly before the country gained independence in 1975.[8] The West Indies cricket team visited the country that year, beating the national side by four wickets.[17] The team for that match contained six indigenous players, and from this point on, indigenous players began to dominate the national team.[8]

They played in the first ICC Trophy in 1979, though they failed to progress beyond the first round.[18] They won the gold medal at the first South Pacific Games cricket tournament later in the year and have won the gold medal every time since.[8][11] After a tour of Australia in 1981,[19] Papua New Guinea had their best international performance in the 1982 ICC Trophy where they finished third after beating Bangladesh in a play-off.[20]

Papua New Guinea again failed to progress beyond the first round at the 1986 ICC Trophy,[21] though they did record the highest total in the tournament's history in their match against Gibraltar.[22] They bounced back to win the gold medal at the South Pacific Games in New Caledonia the following year.[8] They reached the second round of the 1990 ICC Trophy in the Netherlands[23] and the gold medal when they hosted the South Pacific Games in 1991.[8]

They reached the plate final of the 1994 ICC Trophy, but did not play the match as they had already booked a flight home, not expecting to qualify.[24] This has been an occasional problem for Papua New Guinea, as flights to and from the country are infrequent. They also left the 1998 ACC Trophy in Nepal early after losing their first two games, forfeiting their match against the Maldives as otherwise they would have had to have waited more than a week for the next flight. This has also meant they have rarely played overseas outside of official tournaments, the only exceptions being a visit to Fiji in 1977, a tour of Hong Kong in the early 1980s and the aforementioned tour of Australia.[8]

Modern era

Another international outlet for Papua New Guinea team opened up in 1996 when they participated in the first ACC Trophy in Kuala Lumpur. They reached the semi-final, where they lost to Bangladesh.[25] They played in the tournament again in 1998, but left the tournament early. They have not played in the tournament since due to the establishment of the ICC's East Asia/Pacific development region.[8] In-between the two ACC Trophy tournaments, Papua New Guinea finished 13th in the 1997 ICC Trophy.[26] They failed to progress beyond the first round of the 2001 tournament in Ontario.[27] They finished third in the 2001 Pacifica Cup[28] and won the same event in 2002, beating Tonga in the final.[29]

They again won the gold medal at cricket tournament of the 2003 South Pacific Games,[30] and in 2005 played in the repêchage tournament of the 2005 ICC Trophy. They won the tournament after beating regional rivals Fiji in the final.[31] This qualified them for the 2005 ICC Trophy, where they finished 11th.[32] In 2007, Papua New Guinea played in Division Three of the World Cricket League in Darwin where they finished third.[33] They played in the cricket tournament of the 2007 South Pacific Games, where they again won the gold medal.[11]

In late January 2009, Papua New Guinea travelled to Buenos Aires to take part in Division Three of the World Cricket League where they played Argentina, the Cayman Islands, Uganda and the top two teams from Division Four in 2008. A top two finish in this tournament would have qualified them for the 2009 ICC World Cup Qualifier in South Africa later in 2009, from which they could have qualified for the 2011 World Cup.[34] Papua New Guinea narrowly missed qualification, ending up in third place behind Afghanistan and Uganda.

It was third time lucky for Papua New Guinea when they contested Division Three of the World Cricket League in January 2011. Winning their first 4 matches of the tournament, they had assured themselves a top two finish, before losing the final round robin match and then the final, both against Hong Kong.

In April 2011, Papua New Guinea took part in Division Two of the World Cricket League, held in the United Arab Emirates and came third, thus qualifying for the 2014 Cricket World Cup Qualifier in New Zealand.

In February 2013, Papua New Guinea travelled to Auckland, New Zealand, for the EAP Championship and went through the group stages unbeaten before defeating Vanuatu in the final.[35] As a result, they participated in the 2013 ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier in the UAE in October.

ODI and T20I status

Papua New Guinea finished 4th in the final qualifying tournament for the 2015 ICC Cricket World Cup, in New Zealand in 2014. While missing out on qualification for the World Cup, their final position allowed them to gain One Day International (ODI) status for the first time.[36] By having ODI status, the International Cricket Council (ICC) also granted Papua New Guinea Twenty20 International (T20I) status.[37]

The team played their first ODI match in a two-match series against Hong Kong in Australia in November 2014.[38]

8 November 2014
Scorecard
Hong Kong 
202 (48.3)
v
 Papua New Guinea
203/6 (40 overs)
Jamie Atkinson 59 (79)
Assad Vala 2/17 (5 overs)
Charles Amini 61* (67)
Irfan Ahmed 3/51 (8 overs)
Papua New Guinea won by 4 wickets
Tony Ireland Stadium, Townsville
Umpires: Phil Jones (NZ) and Paul Wilson (Aus)
  • Hong Kong won the toss and chose to bat.
  • First ever ODI match for Papua New Guinea.

They won the first by 4 wickets, the second by 3 wickets. As on date (November-2016), they are the only country that has won its first two ODIs.[39]

Papua New Guinea's first scheduled T20I match was against Hong Kong on 13 July 2015 at the 2015 ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier. However the match was abandoned without a ball bowled due to rain, with no toss taking place.[40] They played their first full match two days later, against Ireland, beating them by 2 wickets.[41] With their victory against Nepal on 17 July, they became the first team to qualify for the play-off section of the tournament.[42]

Papua New Guinea crashed out early from the race of qualification for the 2016 ICC World Twenty20 slated to be held in India. They finished eighth during the ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier in Ireland and Scotland.

In September 2017, then team coach Jason Gillespie suggested that Papua New Guinea should be added to the Australian domestic limited-overs cricket tournament.[43][44]

Papua New Guinea has qualified for 2021 ICC Men's T20 World Cup to be held in India.

On the 30th of March 2021, it was announced that Carl Sandri was appointed as the new national coach and high performance manager for all three national squads and will oversee the high performance department and the development of talent in PNG.[45]

Papua New Guinea Cricket Board

Papua New Guinea Cricket Board is the official governing body of the sport of cricket in Papua New Guinea. Its current headquarters is in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Papua New Guinea Cricket Board is Papua New Guinea's representative at the International Cricket Council and is an associate member and has been a member of that body since 1973. It is also a member of the East Asia-Pacific Cricket Council.

Home ground

Papua New Guinea national cricket team is located in Papua New Guinea
Locations of all stadiums which have hosted international cricket matches within Papua New Guinea

Amini Park

Amini Park is a cricket ground in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea.[46][47] The ground is named for the Amini family, several of whom have played cricket for Papua New Guinea,[48] the ground has seen the men's team play Australia, the West Indies and Victoria.

The women's team played Japan in a three match series at the ground in September 2006.[49]

Current squad

This lists all the players who have played for Papua New Guniea in the past 12 months or has been part of the latest ODI or T20I squad. Updated as of 17 July 2022.

Name Age Batting style Bowling style Notes
Batters
Tony Ura 32 Right-handed
Lega Siaka 29 Right-handed Right-arm leg break
Sese Bau 30 Left-handed Right-arm medium
Hiri Hiri 27 Right-handed Right-arm off break
All-rounders
Assad Vala 34 Right-handed Right-arm off break Captain
Norman Vanua 28 Right-handed Right-arm medium
Charles Amini 30 Left-handed Right-arm leg break
Chad Soper 30 Right-handed Right-arm medium
Simon Atai 22 Left-handed Slow left-arm orthodox Wicket-keeper
Jason Kila 32 Left-handed Slow left-arm orthodox
Wicket-keepers
Kiplin Doriga 26 Right-handed
Dogodo Bau 27 Right-handed
Hila Vare 20 Left-handed
Pace Bowlers
Riley Hekure 27 Right-handed Right-arm medium
Kabua Morea 28 Right-handed Left-arm medium
Damien Ravu 28 Right-handed Right-arm medium
Semo Kamea 20 Left-handed Left-arm fast
Nosaina Pokana 26 Right-handed Left-arm medium
Alei Nao 28 Right-handed Right-arm medium

Tournament history

ICC Cricket World Cup

World Cup record
Year Round Position GP W L T NR
England 1975 Did not participate
England 1979 Did not qualify
England 1983 Did not qualify
IndiaPakistan 1987 Did not qualify
Australia New Zealand 1992 Did not qualify
India Pakistan Sri Lanka 1996 Did not qualify
England 1999 Did not qualify
South Africa 2003 Did not qualify
Cricket West Indies 2007 Did not qualify
India Sri Lanka Bangladesh 2011 Not eligible
Australia New Zealand 2015 Did not qualify
England 2019 Did not qualify
India 2023 TBD
Total 0 Titles 0/10 0 0 0 0 0

ICC Cricket World Cup Qualifier (ICC Trophy)

ICC T20 World Cup

ICC T20 World Cup
Year Round Position GP W L T NR
South Africa 2007 Did not qualify
England 2009 Did not qualify
Cricket West Indies 2010 Did not qualify
Sri Lanka 2012 Did not qualify
Bangladesh 2014 Did not qualify
India 2016 Did not qualify
Oman 2021 Group Stage 16/16 3 0 3 0 0
Australia 2022 TBD
Total 0 Titles 0/16 3 0 3 0 0

ICC T20 World Cup Qualifier

ICC World Cricket League

ICC EAP Cricket Trophy

Pacifica Cup

(South) Pacific Games

ACC Trophy

Records and statistics of international matches

International match summary – Papua New Guinea[61][62]

Playing record
Format M W L T NR Inaugural match
One-Day Internationals 45 10 35 0 0 8 November 2014
Twenty20 Internationals 43 21 21 0 1 15 July 2015

Last updated 17 July 2022

One-Day Internationals

ODI record versus other nations[61]

Opponent M W L T NR First match First win
v. Test nations
 Ireland 1 0 1 0 0 6 March 2018
 West Indies 1 0 1 0 0 8 March 2018
v. Associate Members
 Hong Kong 8 4 4 0 0 8 November 2014 8 November 2014
 Namibia 2 0 2 0 0 22 September 2019
   Nepal 6 2 4 0 0 7 September 2021 25 March 2022
 Oman 6 0 6 0 0 14 August 2019
 Scotland 10 1 9 0 0 6 October 2017 8 October 2017
 United Arab Emirates 6 2 4 0 0 31 March 2017 2 April 2017
 United States 5 1 4 0 0 27 April 2019 27 April 2019

Records complete to ODI #4389. Last updated 16 April 2022.

Twenty20 Internationals

T20I record versus other nations[62]

v. Test nations
Opposition M W L T NR First Match First Win
 Afghanistan 1 0 1 0 0 23 July 2015
 Bangladesh 1 0 1 0 0 21 October 2021
 Ireland 4 2 2 0 0 15 July 2015 15 July 2015
 Zimbabwe 1 0 1 0 0 15 July 2022
v. Associate Members
 Bermuda 1 1 0 0 0 19 October 2019 19 October 2019
 Hong Kong 1 0 1 0 0 14 July 2022
 Kenya 1 1 0 0 0 27 October 2019 27 October 2019
 Malaysia 2 1 1 0 0 29 March 2022 1 April 2022
 Namibia 3 2 1 0 0 20 October 2019 20 October 2019
   Nepal 4 1 3 0 0 17 July 2015 17 July 2015
 Netherlands 3 1 2 0 0 24 October 2019 24 October 2019
 Oman 1 0 1 0 0 17 October 2021
 Philippines 2 1 0 0 1 22 March 2019 22 March 2019
 Samoa 2 2 0 0 0 8 July 2019 8 July 2019
 Scotland 3 0 3 0 0 21 October 2019
 Singapore 3 2 1 0 0 25 October 2019 25 October 2019
 Uganda 1 1 0 0 0 12 July 2022 12 July 2022
 United Arab Emirates 3 0 3 0 0 12 April 2017
 United States 1 0 0 0 0 17 July 2022 17 July 2022
 Vanuatu 5 5 0 0 0 22 March 2019 22 March 2019

Records complete to T20I #1667. Last updated 17 July 2022.

Other records and statistics

First-class matches

ICC Trophy

Overall

See also

Notes

References

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