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Paramilitary Forces of Pakistan
Founded14 August 1947; 74 years ago (1947-08-14)
Service branches
HeadquartersIslamabad, Lahore, Karachi, Quetta, Peshawar and Gilgit

The Paramilitary forces of Pakistan (Urdu: نظامیانِ نیم عسکری پاکستان) consist of various uniformed organizations that are sanctioned by the Pakistani constitution and government. The paramilitary forces are responsible to maintain internal peace, to help local law enforcement agencies, and to carry out border patrol, counter-insurgency, counter-terrorism, riot control and anti-smuggling operations under the Ministry of Interior. The paramilitary forces not formally a part of Pakistan Armed Forces, but sometimes working alongside them to provide security and relief in response to natural disasters. The paramilitary forces come's under the direct command of Ministry of Defense and Armed Forces in War times.[1][2][3]

List of Paramilitary forces

Colonel Masud, Commandant of the Frontier Corps' Pishin Scouts (right), presents U.S. Drug Enforcement Administrator Karen P. Tandy (left) with his unit ballcap in Chaman, Balochistan, Pakistan, September 2007
Colonel Masud, Commandant of the Frontier Corps' Pishin Scouts (right), presents U.S. Drug Enforcement Administrator Karen P. Tandy (left) with his unit ballcap in Chaman, Balochistan, Pakistan, September 2007

As of 2021 the strength of Pakistan's federal paramilitaries is approximately 500,000 personnel,[4] which are divided into two main categories:

Some federal paramilitaries under the Interior Ministry can also have their command superseded by the Defence Ministry, effectively combined to form a reserve force for the Pakistani military during times of war.

Strength and divisions

Force Government department(s) Headquarters Total active personnel
National Guard Ministry of Defence Rawalpindi, Punjab 185,000[5]
Maritime Security Agency Ministry of Defence Karachi, Sindh 4000[5]
Pakistan Coast Guards Ministry of Defence Karachi, Sindh 7,000[5]
Pakistan Rangers Ministry of Interior

Ministry of Defence

Islamabad, ICT

Lahore, Punjab

Karachi, Sindh

150,000[6]
Frontier Corps Ministry of Interior

Ministry of Defence

Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

Quetta, Balochistan

100,000[citation needed]
Gilgit−Baltistan Scouts Ministry of Interior

Ministry of Defence

Gilgit, Gilgit−Baltistan 25,000[5]
Frontier Constabulary Ministry of Interior Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa 26,000[citation needed]
Anti-Narcotics Force Ministry of Narcotics Control Rawalpindi, Punjab 3,100[citation needed]
Airports Security Force Ministry of Defence
Federal Aviation Division
Karachi, Sindh 8,930[citation needed]

Civil Armed Forces (CAF)

CAF units are authorised by the Constitution of Pakistan with border security and internal security duties, but can be "regularised" i.e. attached to regular Army as necessary.

The CAF are paid for from the budget of the Ministry of Interior which also provides administrative support. However they are (with the exception of the Frontier Constabulary) commanded by officers on secondment from the Pakistan Army. They function under the operational control of army corps headquarters, not just in war time but whenever Article 245 of the Pakistani Constitution is invoked to provide 'military aid to civil power', for example in Karachi since 2015, and in Punjab since February 2017 .

The CAF are currently undergoing significant expansion of some (57) additional 'wings' approved for raising in the 2015–16 to deal with the challenging internal and border security environment and to provide security for the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), co-ordinated by a new 2-star command raised in September 2016, the Special Security Division.[7]

Many CAF units were originally raised in the colonial era on the frontiers of the empire, and played a key role in the consolidation of control by building a link between the state and communities in strategically sensitive frontier areas through recruitment to government service. In many areas paramilitary units continue to play exactly the same historical role decades after independence.

MoD Paramilitary Forces

Bases in Karachi,Gawadar,Pasni and Keti bandar

Note that the Northern Light Infantry and the Azad Kashmir Regiment were once considered paramilitary forces until their promotion into the Pakistan Army in 1999[9][10][11][12] and 1972[13] respectively.

Other Federal Paramilitary Forces

Ranks and insignia

Rank group General/flag officers Field/senior officers Junior officers Officer cadet
Pakistan Rangers
Director general
ڈائریکٹر جنرل
Senior superintendent
of the Rangers
سینئر سپرنٹنڈنٹ۔
Superintendent
of the Rangers
سپرنٹنڈنٹ
Deputy superintendent
of the Rangers
ڈپٹی سپرنٹنڈنٹ۔
Inspector
انسپکٹر
Direct Entry Sub inspector
ڈائریکٹ انٹری سب انسپکٹر۔


Pakistan
Frontier Constabulary

Commandant
کمانڈنٹ
Deputy commandant
ڈپٹی کمانڈنٹ۔
District officer
ضلعی افسر۔
Assistant district officer
اسسٹنٹ ڈسٹرکٹ آفیسر۔


Gilgit−Baltistan Scouts
Brigadier
بریگیڈیئر
Colonel
کرنل
Lieutenant colonel
لیفٹیننٹ کرنل
Major
میجر
Captain
کیپٹن
Lieutenant
لیفٹنینٹ
Second lieutenant
سیکنڈ لیفٹیننٹ


Pakistan Coast Guards
Major general
میجر جنرل
Brigadier
بریگیڈیئر
Colonel
کرنل
Lieutenant colonel
لیفٹیننٹ کرنل
Major
میجر
Captain
کیپٹن
Lieutenant
لیفٹنینٹ
Second lieutenant
سیکنڈ لیفٹیننٹ


Pakistan Maritime
Security Agency

Rear admiral
بحریہ کا امیر
Commodore
کموڈور
Captain
کپتان
Commander
کمانڈر
Lieutenant commander
لیفٹیننٹ کمانڈر
Lieutenant
لیفٹیننٹ
Sub-lieutenant
سب لیفٹیننٹ۔
Midshipman
مڈ شپ مین


Rank group General/flag officers Field/senior officers Junior officers Officer cadet
Rank group Junior commissioned officers Non commissioned officer Enlisted
Pakistan Rangers
No insignia
Senior inspector
سینئر انسپکٹر۔
Inspector
انسپکٹر
Sub inspector
سب انسپکٹر۔
Havildar
حوالدار۔
Naik
نائیک۔
Lance Naik
لانس نائیک۔
Sepoy
سپاہی۔


Pakistan
Frontier Constabulary

No insignia
Inspector
انسپکٹر
Sub inspector
سب انسپکٹر۔
Assistant sub inspector
اسسٹنٹ سب انسپکٹر۔
Head Constable
ہیڈ کانسٹیبل۔
Constable
کانسٹیبل


Gilgit−Baltistan Scouts
No insignia
Subedar-Major
صوبیدار میجر
Subedar
صوبیدار
Naib Subedar
نائب صوبیدار
Havildar
حوالدار۔
Naik
نائیک۔
Lance Naik
لانس نائیک۔
Sepoy
سپاہی۔


Pakistan Coast Guards
No insignia
Subedar-Major
صوبیدار میجر
Subedar
صوبیدار
Naib Subedar
نائب صوبیدار
Havildar
حوالدار۔
Naik
نائیک۔
Lance Naik
لانس نائیک۔
Sepoy
سپاہی۔


Pakistan Maritime
Security Agency

No insignia
Master Chief Petty Officer
ماسٹر چیف پیٹی آفیسر۔
Fleet Chief Petty Officer
فلیٹ چیف پیٹی آفیسر۔
Chief Petty Officer
چیف پیٹی آفیسر۔
Petty Officer
چھوٹا افسر۔
Leading Seaman
معروف سی مین۔
Able Tech-I
قابل ٹیک- I۔
Ordinary Tech-II
عام ٹیک II۔
Rank group Junior commissioned officers Non commissioned officer Enlisted

See also

References

  1. ^ "COAS directs Karachi Corps to step up rescue work". www.thenews.com.pk. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  2. ^ "Pakistan's Gilgit-Baltistan: Between the Kashmir conflict and China". Pakistan's Gilgit-Baltistan: Between the Kashmir conflict and China. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  3. ^ "No link with recent GB, upcoming AJK polls: ECP". www.thenews.com.pk. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  4. ^ "Paramilitary Force Strength by Country (2021)". Retrieved 10 October 2021.
  5. ^ a b c d Pakistan Intelligence, security Activities and Operations Handbook, Int'l Business Publications, 2011 Edition, pp. 131, ISBN 0-7397-1194-6
  6. ^ The International Institute of Strategic Studies (14 February 2017). The Military Balance 2017. Routledge, Chapman & Hall, Incorporated. ISBN 9781857439007.
  7. ^ Uploader (15 August 2016). "NAP decision: 29 new wings of civil armed forces to be raised". Archived from the original on 27 February 2017. Retrieved 26 February 2017.
  8. ^ "Pakistan Rangers (Sindh)". Archived from the original on 24 August 2010. Retrieved 27 January 2010.
  9. ^ https://www.pakistanarmy.gov.pk/AWPReview/TextContent.aspx?pId=162 Archived 25 March 2018 at the Wayback Machine Northern Light Infantry Regiment (NLI)
  10. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 21 January 2019. Retrieved 21 January 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  11. ^ http://www.gilgitbaltistanscouts.gov.pk/gbs%20history.htm Archived 4 July 2018 at the Wayback Machine History of Gilgit Baltistan Scouts
  12. ^ Snedden, Christopher (2015), Understanding Kashmir and Kashmiris, Oxford University Press, p. 255, ISBN 978-1-84904-342-7
  13. ^ "Azad Kashmir Regiment". 22 March 2016. Archived from the original on 22 March 2016.
  14. ^ "Videos - The Express Tribune". The Express Tribune. Archived from the original on 25 September 2011. Retrieved 24 September 2011.