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Some of the popular Pashtun dishes, from left to right: 1. Lamb grilled kebab (seekh kabab); 2. Palao and salad; 3. Tandoori chicken; and 4. Mantu (dumplings). The Pashtun cuisine includes a blend of Central Asian, Eastern Asian, South Asian and the Middle Eastern cuisines. Most Pashtun dishes are traditionally non-spicy.
Some of the popular Pashtun dishes, from left to right: 1. Lamb grilled kebab (seekh kabab); 2. Palao and salad; 3. Tandoori chicken; and 4. Mantu (dumplings). The Pashtun cuisine includes a blend of Central Asian, Eastern Asian, South Asian and the Middle Eastern cuisines. Most Pashtun dishes are traditionally non-spicy.

Pashtun cuisine (Pashto: پښتنۍ خواړه‎) refers to the cuisine of the Pashtuns. The cuisine of the Pashtun people is covered under Afghan cuisine and Pakistani cuisine, and is largely based on plethora of meat dishes that includes lamb, beef, chicken, and fresh fish as well as rice and some other vegetables.[1] Accompanying these staples are also dairy products (yogurt, whey, cheeses), including various nuts, locally grown vegetables, as well as fresh and dried fruits. Cities such as Kandahar, Jalalabad, Kabul, Quetta, Parachinar, Mardan, and especially Peshawar are known for being the centers of Pashtun cuisine.

Dishes

Bolani

The following is a short and incomplete list of some food items that Pashtuns often eat.

Breakfast items

See also

References