Paul Mescal
Mescal in 2023
Born
Paul Colm Michael Mescal

(1996-02-02) 2 February 1996 (age 28)
Maynooth, County Kildare, Ireland
Alma materTrinity College Dublin (BA)
OccupationActor
Years active2017–present
RelativesNell Mescal (sister)
AwardsFull list

Paul Colm Michael Mescal[1] (/ˈmɛskəl/ MESS-kəl;[2][3] born 2 February 1996) is an Irish actor. Born in Maynooth, he studied acting at The Lir Academy and subsequently performed in plays in Dublin theatres. Mescal rose to fame with his role in the miniseries Normal People (2020), earning a BAFTA TV Award and a nomination for a Primetime Emmy Award.

Mescal expanded to films with roles in the psychological dramas The Lost Daughter (2021) and God's Creatures (2022). His leading role as a troubled father in Aftersun (2022) earned him nominations for an Academy Award and BAFTA Film Award. Mescal won a Laurence Olivier Award for his portrayal of Stanley Kowalski in a 2022 revival of the play A Streetcar Named Desire. The following year, he starred in the drama All of Us Strangers, for which he received his second BAFTA Film Award nomination.

Early life and education

[edit]

Mescal was born on 2 February 1996 in Maynooth, County Kildare, to Dearbhla, a Garda, and Paul, a schoolteacher who acted semi-professionally as well.[4][5] The eldest of three children, he has a brother and a sister.[6][7] He attended Maynooth Post Primary School.[8]

Mescal was a minor and under-21 Gaelic football player for Kildare and a member of the Maynooth GAA club.[9][10] Gaelic footballer Brian Lacey praised Mescal's skills as a defender,[11] while physical trainer Cian O'Neill described him as "mature beyond his years ... very developed and very strong".[12] He gave up the sport after a jaw injury.[13]

Mescal performed on stage for the first time at age 16, portraying the titular Phantom in the musical The Phantom of the Opera,[6][8] after which he auditioned and gained admission to The Lir Academy at Trinity College Dublin.[14] He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Acting in 2017.[15] He secured agents for his acting career prior to his graduation.[14]

Career

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Theatre and television roles (2017–2020)

[edit]

Upon obtaining his Bachelor of Arts degree, Mescal was offered roles in two theatre productions, Angela's Ashes and The Great Gatsby; he took on the latter and starred as the titular Jay Gatsby at the Gate Theatre in Dublin.[16] The Irish Times Peter Crawley highlighted his work as a "butterfly of self-creation among an ensemble in constant motion and fluttering improvisation".[17] He also portrayed the Prince in a contemporary retelling of Hans Christian Andersen's The Red Shoes at the same theatre that year.[18] Mescal appeared in the world premiere of the 2018 play Asking for It by Louise O'Neill at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin; Steve Cummins of The Times commended his distinctive performance.[19] The same year, he made his London stage debut in The Plough and the Stars at the Lyric Hammersmith and starred in the Rough Magic Theatre Company's productions of A Midsummer Night's Dream for the Kilkenny Arts Festival and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man for the Dublin Theatre Festival.[20] In 2020, he performed in the play The Lieutenant of Inishmore at Dublin's Gaiety Theatre.[21]

Mescal starred in his first television role in the drama miniseries Normal People, an adaptation of the 2018 novel of the same name by Sally Rooney.[22] It premiered in the UK on BBC Three and in the US on Hulu in 2020.[23][24] He played student Connell Waldron; he viewed the role as different from himself in the way Waldron's traits include hesitance and emotional unavailability.[14] Like the actor did in real life, the character plays Gaelic football and attends Trinity College.[25] The role propelled Mescal to fame.[6][26] He earned acclaim as well as the BAFTA TV Award for Best Actor for his performance.[27][28] In their respective reviews for Variety and Slate, Caroline Framke called Mescal's navigation through the character's emotional collapse "breathtaking", while Willa Paskin noted his concurrent embodiment of "intelligence, insecurity and quiet confidence".[29][30] He also received nominations for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie and the Critics' Choice Television Award for Best Actor in a Movie/Miniseries.[31][32]

Mescal starred in Drifting, a short film, which was screened at the 2020 Galway Film Fleadh.[33] He played a firefighter in the Channel 5 miniseries The Deceived and appeared in the music video for the song "Scarlet" by The Rolling Stones in August.[34][35] Reviewing The Deceived, The Independent critic Ed Power highlighted Mescal's effortless "sleepy-eyed charm" and "flawless" Donegal accent.[36]

Film breakthrough (2021–present)

[edit]
Mescal at the 2022 Directors' Fortnight

Mescal made his feature film debut with a supporting role in The Lost Daughter, directed by Maggie Gyllenhaal in her directorial debut.[37] Released in 2021, the psychological drama garnered favourable reviews.[38][39] The following year, Mescal starred as a man accused of sexual assault in the psychological drama God's Creatures and as a troubled young father in the drama Aftersun, both of which premiered at the 2022 Cannes Film Festival. The two films received positive reviews, with Mescal's performances gaining praise.[40][41] IndieWire critic Kate Erbland found Mescal's work in God's Creatures "powerful" and "quietly chilling".[42] Reviewing Aftersun, Peter Travers of ABC News highlighted his "disarming charm and elemental power" in his portrayal of a "complex role".[43] He received nominations for the Academy Award for Best Actor and the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role for the latter.[44][45]

Mescal starred in Carmen, which premiered at the 2022 Toronto International Film Festival and was theatrically released in 2023.[46] IndieWire's David Ehrlich stated that Mescal asserts his "gravitas" and "poise" in his role as a veteran of the US military.[47] Mescal began portraying Stanley Kowalski in a revival of the play A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams at the Almeida Theatre in December 2022. The production garnered acclaim and transferred to the West End in March 2023.[48][49] The Times's Dominic Maxwell found him "tremendous" and opined that he "makes the latent violence of Stanley Kowalski into something easy, tangible, vibrant yet unactorly".[50] Mescal won the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Actor for the portrayal.[51]

In 2023, Mescal starred alongside Andrew Scott in All of Us Strangers, a loose adaptation of the novel Strangers by Taichi Yamada.[52] It premiered at the 50th Telluride Film Festival.[53] The Hollywood Reporter's David Rooney commended the "warm, sexy chemistry" between Mescal and Scott.[54] For his role, Mescal received a nomination for the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role.[55] He also starred opposite Saoirse Ronan in Foe, an adaptation of Iain Reid's science fiction novel of the same name;[56] the film was not well-received by critics.[57][58] In 2024, Mescal was honoured by the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures with the Vantage Award, for emerging artists.[59]

Mescal will next star in Gladiator II, Ridley Scott's sequel to the 2000 historical drama,[60] and in The History of Sound, a romantic drama opposite Josh O'Connor.[61] He replaced Blake Jenner in the lead role of composer Franklin Shepard in Richard Linklater's Merrily We Roll Along, a film adaptation of the 1981 musical of the same name, which is set to be filmed over 20 years.[62]

Personal life

[edit]

Mescal speaks English and Irish.[63][64] He moved from his native Ireland to London in 2020.[65] Mescal stated in 2022 that he had purchased a property in Ireland, with the intention of spending time there when he is not working. He is open about seeing a therapist, which he says is "to keep sane".[66] Mescal has said that "the entitlement to the information that people expect" angers him and that private matters "should never be commented on" because it is "indecent" as well as "unkind".[67] Mescal was in a relationship with singer Phoebe Bridgers.[67][68] He appeared in Bridgers' music video for the song "Savior Complex", directed by Phoebe Waller-Bridge.[69]

Mescal plays the piano,[13] and has performed covers of songs with his sister, singer Nell Mescal.[70] Mescal has also provided background vocals on Bridgers' song "So Much Wine", with its proceeds going to the Los Angeles LGBT Center.[71] In July 2020, he performed spoken word and sang with singer Dermot Kennedy at the Natural History Museum, London.[72] He participated in a virtual stage reading of the play This Is Our Youth by Kenneth Lonergan as part of a series to benefit the Actors Fund of America charity in October of the same year.[73]

Acting credits

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Key
Denotes films that have not yet been released

Film

[edit]
Year Title Role Notes Ref.
2020 Drifting Cian Short film [33]
2021 The Lost Daughter Will [37]
2022 God's Creatures Brian O'Hara [40]
Aftersun Calum Paterson [40]
Carmen Aidan [46]
2023 All of Us Strangers Harry [54]
Foe Junior [56]
2024 Who is Sabato De Sarno? A Gucci Story Narrator Documentary short film [74]
Gladiator II Lucius Verus Post-production [60]
TBA The History of Sound Lionel Post-production [61]
Merrily We Roll Along Franklin Shepard Filming [62]

Television

[edit]
Year Title Role Notes Ref.
2020 Normal People Connell Waldron Miniseries [23]
The Deceived Seán McKeogh Miniseries [34]

Music videos

[edit]
Year Title Artist(s) Ref.
2020 "Scarlet" The Rolling Stones [35]
"Savior Complex" Phoebe Bridgers [69]

Theatre

[edit]
Year Title Role Notes Ref.
2017 The Great Gatsby Jay Gatsby Gate Theatre, Dublin [16]
2017–2018 The Red Shoes Prince Gate Theatre, Dublin [18]
2018 The Plough and the Stars Lieutenant Langon Lyric Theatre, London [16]
Asking for It Bryan Abbey Theatre, Dublin [19]
A Midsummer Night's Dream Demetrius Kilkenny Arts Festival [20]
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Stephen Dedalus Dublin Theatre Festival [20]
2020 The Lieutenant of Inishmore Mad Padraic Gaiety Theatre, Dublin [21]
2022–2023 A Streetcar Named Desire Stanley Kowalski Almeida Theatre, London
Phoenix Theatre, London
[48][49]

Discography

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Soundtrack

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Year Song Film Ref.
2023 "Slip Away" Carmen [75][76]
"Lullaby / Beyond – Vive La Musique"

Accolades

[edit]

References

[edit]
  1. ^ "Paul Mescal and Andrew Scott Take The Co-Star Test". Buzzfeed. 13 December 2023. Retrieved 21 December 2023.
  2. ^ "Rapid Fire Questions: Paul Mescal and Daisy Edgar-Jones • Normal People". Hulu. 6 May 2020. Archived from the original on 24 May 2022. Retrieved 24 May 2022.
  3. ^ "Paul Mescal Goes Undercover on YouTube, Twitter and Wikipedia". GQ. 19 October 2020. Archived from the original on 24 May 2022. Retrieved 24 May 2022.
  4. ^ "Paul Mescal: Age, Height & Dating Details Of 'Normal People' Actor". Capital FM. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  5. ^ Armstrong, Maggie (11 January 2020). "Readers' expectations are the 'biggest source of anxiety' – Paul Mescal on tackling role of Connell in Normal People". Irish Independent. Archived from the original on 31 May 2020. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  6. ^ a b c Paiella, Gabriella (19 October 2020). "How Paul Mescal Became the Crush of the Year". GQ. Archived from the original on 25 January 2021. Retrieved 8 June 2021.
  7. ^ Glasgow, Abigail (29 April 2020). "'Normal People' Star Paul Mescal Showed His Parents the Sex Scenes". Paper. Archived from the original on 2 May 2020. Retrieved 30 August 2020.
  8. ^ a b Lloyd, Brian (2 May 2020). "Here's 'Normal People' star Paul Mescal performing 'Phantom of the Opera' as a teen". Entertainment.ie. Archived from the original on 29 November 2020. Retrieved 10 September 2021.
  9. ^ Ward, Patrick (16 December 2017). "From Kildare football star to Irish theatre star – Mescal revelling on a new stage". Kildare Now. Archived from the original on 3 November 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  10. ^ Regan, Jarlath (25 April 2020). "Paul Mescal". An Irishman Abroad (Podcast). SoundCloud. Archived from the original on 19 June 2020. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  11. ^ Lawlor, Damian (28 July 2017). "Lacey backs Kildare to prosper without one that got away". The Sunday Times. Archived from the original on 3 November 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  12. ^ Keane, Paul (14 May 2020). "Former Kildare boss Cian O'Neill got a glimpse of Paul Mescal's acting talent". Irish Examiner. Archived from the original on 6 June 2020. Retrieved 14 May 2020.
  13. ^ a b Fitch Little, Harriet (16 March 2020). "Meet the Charismatic Stars of the Highly-Anticipated Normal People Adaptation". Vogue. Archived from the original on 6 April 2020. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  14. ^ a b c Heaf, Jonathan (28 November 2020). "Paul Mescal: 'I had no control over one of the biggest moments in my life'". British GQ. Archived from the original on 1 February 2021. Retrieved 8 June 2021.
  15. ^ Fenwick, George (1 June 2020). "Who is Paul Mescal? The Normal People actor who plays Connell". Evening Standard. Archived from the original on 29 April 2021. Retrieved 29 April 2021.
  16. ^ a b c Green, Alex (6 August 2020). "Paul Mescal: From TV debut to Rolling Stones music video in less than a year". Belfast Telegraph. Archived from the original on 20 September 2020. Retrieved 30 August 2020.
  17. ^ Crawley, Peter (13 July 2017). "The Great Gatsby at the Gate: a magnificently entertaining, dizzying party". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on 21 November 2022. Retrieved 3 February 2023.
  18. ^ a b Sweeney, Tanya (15 December 2017). "'It was tough... but I've stepped into a time in Irish theatre that's really alive'". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on 15 December 2017. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  19. ^ a b Cummins, Steve (17 November 2018). "Review: Asking For It at Abbey Theatre, Dublin". The Times. Archived from the original on 17 November 2018. Retrieved 28 August 2020. Paul Mescal delivers a standout performance as Bryan, Emma's sympathetic brother.
  20. ^ a b c Crawley, Peter (4 August 2018). "It's a kind of magic: electric midsummer night's dreams in Kilkenny Castle". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on 4 August 2018. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  21. ^ a b Charleton, Fiona (9 February 2020). "Theatre review: The Lieutenant of Inishmore". The Times. Archived from the original on 9 February 2020. Retrieved 31 August 2020.
  22. ^ Mangan, Lucy (26 April 2020). "Normal People review – Sally Rooney's love story is a small-screen triumph". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 26 April 2020. Retrieved 2 September 2020.
  23. ^ a b Goldsbrough, Susannah (22 April 2020). "Normal People, first-look review: a riveting romance for the millennial age". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 28 August 2020. Normal People arrives as a boxset on BBC Three on April 26.
  24. ^ Holmes, Linda (29 April 2020). "Review: 'Normal People' Skillfully Adapts Sally Rooney's Novel". NPR. Archived from the original on 29 April 2020. Retrieved 28 August 2020.
  25. ^ Machell, Ben (18 May 2020). "Paul Mescal: the heart-throb star of Sally Rooney's Normal People". The Times. Archived from the original on 6 February 2021. Retrieved 5 July 2021.
  26. ^ Rao, Sonia (4 November 2022). "Paul Mescal on 'Aftersun,' disaster movies and that 'Normal People' ending". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 1 February 2023. Retrieved 1 February 2023.
  27. ^ Garner, Dwight; Poniewozik, James; Sehgal, Parul; Szalai, Jennifer (15 May 2020). "Bringing 'Normal People' to Sexy, Soundtracked Life". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 4 January 2021. Retrieved 2 September 2020.
  28. ^ Kanter, Jake (6 June 2021). "BAFTA TV Awards Winners: 'I May Destroy You' Triumphs; Paul Mescal Wins Best Actor; 'The Crown' Snubbed". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on 6 June 2021. Retrieved 7 June 2021.
  29. ^ Framke, Caroline (22 April 2020). "'Normal People' Review: Hulu's Sally Rooney Adaptation is Bruising". Variety. Archived from the original on 20 January 2021. Retrieved 14 June 2021.
  30. ^ Paskin, Willa (24 April 2020). "Normal People, Hulu's swoony adaptation of Sally Rooney's novel, reviewed". Slate. Archived from the original on 6 January 2021. Retrieved 14 June 2021.
  31. ^ Villarreal, Yvonne (28 July 2020). "Emmys 2020: Paul Mescal of 'Normal People' on his nomination". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 29 July 2020. Retrieved 28 August 2020.
  32. ^ Schneider, Michael (18 January 2021). "'Ozark,' 'The Crown' and Netflix Lead 26th Annual Critics' Choice Awards TV Nominations". Variety. Archived from the original on 18 January 2021. Retrieved 18 January 2021.
  33. ^ a b "Granard film to feature in Galway Film Fleadh". The Anglo-Celt. 8 July 2020. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 4 November 2020.
  34. ^ a b Carr, Flora (4 August 2020). "The Deceived's creators: 'There was a buzz about Paul Mescal – but no one predicted this'". Radio Times. Archived from the original on 6 August 2020. Retrieved 12 August 2020.
  35. ^ a b Greene, Andy (6 August 2020). "Watch the New Rolling Stones Video 'Scarlet,' Starring Paul Mescal". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 20 January 2021. Retrieved 8 August 2020.
  36. ^ Power, Ed (4 August 2020). "The Deceived review: Paul Mescal conjures his sleepy-eyed charm in this silly and likeable caper". The Independent. Archived from the original on 5 July 2021. Retrieved 5 July 2021.
  37. ^ a b Galuppo, Mia (28 August 2020). "Normal People Breakout Paul Mescal Joins Maggie Gyllenhaal Directorial Debut The Lost Daughter". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on 28 August 2020. Retrieved 28 August 2020.
  38. ^ Goldsmith, Jill (17 December 2021). "The Lost Daughter, The Novice, The Tender Bar Open Into Spider-Man Maelstrom, Covid Jitters – Specialty Preview". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on 17 December 2021. Retrieved 31 December 2021.
  39. ^ Paterson, Colin (16 December 2021). "The Lost Daughter: Olivia Colman on her 'searingly honest' film on motherhood". BBC News. Archived from the original on 16 December 2021. Retrieved 31 December 2021.
  40. ^ a b c Seth, Radhika (23 May 2022). "Paul Mescal is Taking Cannes by Storm". British Vogue. Archived from the original on 24 May 2022. Retrieved 25 May 2022.
  41. ^ Lattanzio, Ryan (24 May 2022). "A24 Buys Paul Mescal Cannes Drama Aftersun for U.S., Canada". IndieWire. Archived from the original on 24 May 2022. Retrieved 25 May 2022.
  42. ^ Erbland, Kate (19 May 2022). "God's Creatures Review: Emily Watson and Paul Mescal Crackle in Chilly Irish Family Drama". IndieWire. Archived from the original on 19 May 2022. Retrieved 1 February 2023.
  43. ^ Travers, Peter (4 November 2022). "Aftersun review: This is the best film of the year by a first time writer-director". ABC News. Archived from the original on 4 November 2022. Retrieved 3 February 2023.
  44. ^ Lang, Brent; Moreau, Jordan (24 January 2023). "Oscar Nominations 2023: The Full List". Variety. Archived from the original on 1 February 2023. Retrieved 24 January 2023.
  45. ^ Ravindran, Manori (19 January 2023). "BAFTA Awards Nominations Unveiled: All Quiet on the Western Front Leads Race, Banshees & Everything Everywhere Come Up Strong". Variety. Archived from the original on 23 January 2023. Retrieved 19 January 2023.
  46. ^ a b Lambert, Harper (1 February 2023). "Carmen Starring Paul Mescal and Melissa Barrera Gets Theatrical Release From Sony Pictures Classics". TheWrap. Archived from the original on 3 February 2023. Retrieved 3 February 2023.
  47. ^ Ehrlich, David (22 September 2022). "Carmen Review: Lovers on the Run in Benjamin Millepied's Unclassifiable Dance Odyssey". IndieWire. Archived from the original on 19 May 2023. Retrieved 22 August 2023.
  48. ^ a b "A Streetcar Named Desire at 75: Blanche, Stanley, and the Tennessee Williams play that still haunts us". The Independent. 19 December 2022. Archived from the original on 20 December 2022. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  49. ^ a b Wiegand, Chris (25 January 2023). "A Streetcar Named Desire with Paul Mescal transfers to West End". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 29 January 2023. Retrieved 26 January 2023.
  50. ^ Maxwell, Dominic (13 January 2023). "A Streetcar Named Desire review — Magnetic Paul Mescal is no normal leading man". The Times. Archived from the original on 13 January 2023. Retrieved 14 January 2023.
  51. ^ Gumuchian, Marie-Louise (2 April 2023). "Paul Mescal, Jodie Comer win prizes at London theatre's Olivier awards". Reuters. Archived from the original on 2 April 2023. Retrieved 2 April 2023.
  52. ^ Canfield, David (23 August 2023). "Inside All of Us Strangers, Andrew Scott and Paul Mescal's Metaphysical Love Story". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on 29 August 2023. Retrieved 31 August 2023.
  53. ^ Davis, Clayton (30 August 2023). "Telluride Lineup Includes World Premieres of Saltburn, The Bikeriders and Rustin With Tributes for Yorgos Lanthimos and Wim Wenders". Variety. Archived from the original on 31 August 2023. Retrieved 31 August 2023.
  54. ^ a b Rooney, David (31 August 2023). "All of Us Strangers Release Date Set for December". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on 1 September 2023. Retrieved 31 August 2023.
  55. ^ Ritman, Alex; Shafer, Ellise (18 January 2024). "BAFTA Film Awards Nominations: 'Oppenheimer' and 'Poor Things' Lead as 'Barbie' Falls Short". Variety. Archived from the original on 18 January 2024. Retrieved 18 January 2024.
  56. ^ a b D'Alessandro, Anthony (15 August 2023). "Foe Release Date: Saoirse Ronan-Paul Mescal Sci-Fi Film Due In Fall Via Amazon". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on 15 August 2023. Retrieved 16 August 2023.
  57. ^ London, Rob (20 November 2023). "Foe Finds Its Streaming Home". Collider. Archived from the original on 23 November 2023. Retrieved 23 November 2023.
  58. ^ Guarnieri, Isabella (3 November 2023). "Why did Foe flop?". Dazed. Archived from the original on 23 November 2023. Retrieved 23 November 2023.
  59. ^ Carson, Lexi (10 June 2024). "Paul Mescal, Quentin Tarantino and Rita Moreno to Be Honored at Academy Museum Gala". Variety. Retrieved 10 June 2024.
  60. ^ a b Kroll, Justin (6 January 2023). "Paul Mescal To Star In Ridley Scott's 'Gladiator' Sequel For Paramount". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on 6 January 2023. Retrieved 6 January 2023.
  61. ^ a b Damshenas, Sam. "The History of Sound director says Paul Mescal and Josh O'Connor are "on fire" in gay drama". Gay Times. Archived from the original on 19 April 2024. Retrieved 6 March 2024.
  62. ^ a b Sneider, Jeff (9 January 2023). "Exclusive: Paul Mescal Replaces Blake Jenner in Richard Linklater's 20-Year Movie Merrily We Roll Along". AboveTheLine. Archived from the original on 9 January 2023. Retrieved 9 January 2023.
  63. ^ Parkel, Inga (20 February 2023). "Paul Mescal wows fans with fluent Irish interview on Baftas red carpet". The Independent. Archived from the original on 23 February 2023. Retrieved 21 February 2023.
  64. ^ Fahy, Claire (24 February 2023). "'Bursting Proud': Ireland Cheers Paul Mescal for Embracing Irish Language". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 1 May 2023. Retrieved 16 August 2023.
  65. ^ Kaufman, Amy (7 July 2020). "'Normal People' stars can't wait until they can go out for a beer and dance together". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 7 July 2020. Retrieved 31 August 2020.
  66. ^ Hodgkin, Beatrice (16 December 2022). "The quiet magnetism of Paul Mescal". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 25 February 2023. Retrieved 24 January 2023.
  67. ^ a b De Loera, Carlos (17 August 2023). "Paul Mescal is 'angry' that entitled fans want personal info". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 18 August 2023. Retrieved 22 August 2023.
  68. ^ Soteriou, Stephanie (25 August 2023). "Paul Mescal Just Alluded To The "Grief" Of His And Phoebe Bridgers's Breakup For The First Time". BuzzFeed News. Archived from the original on 17 March 2024. Retrieved 17 March 2024.
  69. ^ a b Savage, Mark (1 December 2020). "Paul Mescal stars in Phoebe Bridgers' music video for Savior Complex". BBC News. Archived from the original on 1 December 2020. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  70. ^ Corcoran, Mark (31 July 2020). "Normal People star Paul Mescal and sister Nell show off amazing talent in incredible duet". Irish Mirror. Archived from the original on 28 July 2021. Retrieved 3 October 2020.
  71. ^ McHugh, Connell (18 November 2022). "Phoebe Bridgers releases annual Christmas cover featuring vocals from Paul Mescal". The Irish Post. Archived from the original on 24 November 2022. Retrieved 19 March 2024.
  72. ^ Hodgkinson, Will (31 July 2020). "Dermot Kennedy and Paul Mescal review — an atmospheric and imaginative livestream show". The Times. Archived from the original on 31 July 2020. Retrieved 28 August 2020.
  73. ^ Evans, Greg (7 October 2020). "Morgan Freeman, Laurie Metcalf, Ellen Burstyn, Laura Linney, Matthew Broderick Among All-Star Lineup For Virtual Broadway Play Series". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on 12 October 2020. Retrieved 17 October 2020.
  74. ^ "12 Things I Learned From Gucci's Sabato De Sarno Documentary". Vogue. 20 March 2024. Archived from the original on 16 May 2024. Retrieved 21 March 2024.
  75. ^ Kreps, Daniel (21 April 2023). "See Paul Mescal Make Music Debut With 'Slip Away' From 'Carmen'". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 24 April 2023. Retrieved 24 April 2023.
  76. ^ "Carmen (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)". iTunes Store. 21 April 2023. Archived from the original on 25 April 2023. Retrieved 25 April 2023.
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