Pentaoxidane
Names
IUPAC name
Pentaoxidane
Other names
Hydrogen pentoxide, dihydrogen pentoxide
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
  • InChI=1S/H2O5/c1-3-5-4-2/h1-2H
    Key: KUGRPPRAQNPSQD-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • OOOOO
Properties
H2O5
Molar mass 82.011 g·mol−1
Related compounds
Related compounds
Pentoxolane, Tetraoxidane
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Pentaoxidane is an inorganic compound of hydrogen and oxygen with the chemical formula H2O5.[1] This is one of the most unstable hydrogen polyoxides.[2][3][4]

Synthesis

References

  1. ^ The Chemistry of Peroxides, Volume 3. John Wiley & Sons. 20 April 2015. p. 8. ISBN 978-1-118-41271-8. Retrieved 16 May 2023.
  2. ^ "Selected ATcT [1, 2] enthalpy of formation based on version 1.122 of the Thermochemical Network [3]". atct.anl.gov. Retrieved 15 May 2023.
  3. ^ Denis, Pablo A. (5 October 2013). "Theoretical characterization of hydrogen pentoxide, H 2 O 5". International Journal of Quantum Chemistry. 113 (19): 2206–2212. doi:10.1002/qua.24432. Retrieved 16 May 2023.
  4. ^ Patai, Saul (1983). The Chemistry of Peroxides. Wiley. p. 485. ISBN 978-0-471-10218-2. Retrieved 16 May 2023.
  5. ^ Xu, Xin; Goddard, William A. III (November 2002). "Peroxone chemistry: Formation of H2O3 and ring-(HO2)(HO3) from O3/H2O2". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 99 (24): 15308–15312. Bibcode:2002PNAS...9915308X. doi:10.1073/pnas.202596799. PMC 137712. PMID 12438699.
  6. ^ Levanov, Alexander V.; Sakharov, Dmitri V.; Dashkova, Anna V.; Antipenko, Ewald E.; Lunin, Valeri V. (November 2011). "Synthesis of Hydrogen Polyoxides H 2 O 4 and H 2 O 3 and Their Characterization by Raman Spectroscopy". European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry. 2011 (33): 5144–5150. doi:10.1002/ejic.201100767. ISSN 1434-1948. Retrieved 16 May 2023.