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Location of New Zealand
Location of New Zealand
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New Zealand (Māori: Aotearoa [aɔˈtɛaɾɔa]) is an island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. It consists of two main landmasses—the North Island (Te Ika-a-Māui) and the South Island (Te Waipounamu)—and more than 700 smaller islands, covering a total area of 268,021 square kilometres (103,500 sq mi). New Zealand is about 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the islands of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. The country's varied topography and sharp mountain peaks, including the Southern Alps, owe much to tectonic uplift and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, and its most populous city is Auckland.

Owing to their remoteness, the islands of New Zealand were the last large habitable lands to be settled by humans. Between about 1280 and 1350, Polynesians began to settle in the islands and then developed a distinctive Māori culture. In 1642, the Dutch explorer, Abel Tasman, became the first European to sight New Zealand. In 1840, representatives of the United Kingdom and Māori chiefs signed the Treaty of Waitangi, which declared British sovereignty over the islands. In 1841, New Zealand became a colony within the British Empire, and in 1907 it became a dominion; it gained full statutory independence in 1947, and the British monarch remained the head of state. Today, the majority of New Zealand's population of 5 million is of European descent; the indigenous Māori are the largest minority, followed by Asians and Pacific Islanders. Reflecting this, New Zealand's culture is mainly derived from Māori and early British settlers, with recent broadening arising from increased immigration. The official languages are English, Māori, and New Zealand Sign Language, with English being dominant.

A developed country, New Zealand ranks highly in international comparisons, particularly in education, protection of civil liberties, government transparency, and economic freedom. It underwent major economic changes during the 1980s, which transformed it from a protectionist to a liberalised free-trade economy. The service sector dominates the national economy, followed by the industrial sector, and agriculture; international tourism is a significant source of revenue. Nationally, legislative authority is vested in an elected, unicameral Parliament, while executive political power is exercised by the Cabinet, led by the prime minister, currently Jacinda Ardern. Queen Elizabeth II is the country's monarch and is represented by a governor-general, currently Dame Patsy Reddy. In addition, New Zealand is organised into 11 regional councils and 67 territorial authorities for local government purposes. The Realm of New Zealand also includes Tokelau (a dependent territory); the Cook Islands and Niue (self-governing states in free association with New Zealand); and the Ross Dependency, which is New Zealand's territorial claim in Antarctica. (Full article...)

Good article - show another

This is a Good article, an article that meets a core set of high editorial standards.

The episode marked the debut of the Flight of the Conchords song and single "Robots."
The episode marked the debut of the Flight of the Conchords song and single "Robots."

"Sally" is the pilot episode of the American television sitcom Flight of the Conchords. It first aired on HBO on June 17, 2007. In this episode, New Zealanders Jemaine Clement and Bret McKenzie of the band Flight of the Conchords have moved to New York City to try to make it in the United States. At a party, Jemaine falls for, and subsequently begins dating, Sally—Bret's former girlfriend. As Jemaine's attentions focus on Sally, a lonely Bret is forced to deal with the advances of Mel (Kristen Schaal), the band's obsessed—and only—fan. Meanwhile, Murray (Rhys Darby), the band's manager, helps the band film their first music video, although they cannot afford decent costumes or proper video equipment.

"Sally" received largely positive reviews from critics. According to Nielsen Media Research, "Sally" drew over 1.2 million viewers. Several of the songs from the episode, most notably "Robots", "Not Crying", and "Most Beautiful Girl (In the Room)" received critical acclaim. All three songs were released on the band's EP The Distant Future, although "Robots" appeared in a live form. "Robots" later was re-recorded and released on the band's debut album Flight of the Conchords, along with "Most Beautiful Girl (In the Room)." The latter was later nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Original Music And Lyrics. (Full article...)

General images

The following are images from various New Zealand-related articles on Wikipedia.
  • Knox Church, a Presbyterian church, in Dunedin. The city was founded by Scottish Presbyterian settlers.
    Knox Church, a Presbyterian church, in Dunedin. The city was founded by Scottish Presbyterian settlers.
  • Michael Joseph Savage, Labour Prime Minister 1935–1940. This portrait was hung on the walls of many supporters.
    Michael Joseph Savage, Labour Prime Minister 1935–1940. This portrait was hung on the walls of many supporters.
  • Fiordland is dominated by steep, glacier-carved valleys
    Fiordland is dominated by steep, glacier-carved valleys
  • Lorde as part of the 2014 Lollapalooza lineup
    Lorde as part of the 2014 Lollapalooza lineup
  • Cook Island dancers at Auckland's Pasifika Festival, 2010
    Cook Island dancers at Auckland's Pasifika Festival, 2010
  • A modern wharenui (meeting house of a marae) exhibited at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
    A modern wharenui (meeting house of a marae) exhibited at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
  • A 1943 poster produced during the war. The poster reads: "When war broke out ... industries were unprepared for munitions production. To-day New Zealand is not only manufacturing many kinds of munitions for her own defence but is making a valuable contribution to the defence of the other areas in the Pacific..."
    A 1943 poster produced during the war. The poster reads: "When war broke out ... industries were unprepared for munitions production. To-day New Zealand is not only manufacturing many kinds of munitions for her own defence but is making a valuable contribution to the defence of the other areas in the Pacific..."
  • The first Government House in Auckland, as painted by Edward Ashworth in 1842 or 1843. Auckland was the second capital of New Zealand.
    The first Government House in Auckland, as painted by Edward Ashworth in 1842 or 1843. Auckland was the second capital of New Zealand.
  • Strong winds in the Cook Strait produce high waves which erode the shore, as shown in this image
    Strong winds in the Cook Strait produce high waves which erode the shore, as shown in this image
  • Rural landscape close to Mt Ruapehu
    Rural landscape close to Mt Ruapehu
  • A Māori tekoteko (carved human form) originating from Te Arawa
    A Māori tekoteko (carved human form) originating from Te Arawa
  • The Waikato River flowing out of Lake Taupo
    The Waikato River flowing out of Lake Taupo
  • The Forty-Fours viewed from the north; the leftmost islet is the easternmost point of New Zealand.
    The Forty-Fours viewed from the north; the leftmost islet is the easternmost point of New Zealand.
  • Scorching Bay, Wellington, in summer
    Scorching Bay, Wellington, in summer
  • Elizabeth II and Muldoon's Cabinet, taken during the Queen's 1981 visit to New Zealand
    Elizabeth II and Muldoon's Cabinet, taken during the Queen's 1981 visit to New Zealand
  • Men of the Māori Battalion, New Zealand Expeditionary Force, after disembarking at Gourock in Scotland in June 1940
    Men of the Māori Battalion, New Zealand Expeditionary Force, after disembarking at Gourock in Scotland in June 1940
  • Scottish Highland family migrating to New Zealand, 1844, by William Allsworth. Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington.
    Scottish Highland family migrating to New Zealand, 1844, by William Allsworth. Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington.
  • One of the few extant copies of the Treaty of Waitangi
    One of the few extant copies of the Treaty of Waitangi
  • The kiwi has become a New Zealand icon.
    The kiwi has become a New Zealand icon.
  • Topography of Zealandia, the submerged continent, and the two tectonic plates
    Topography of Zealandia, the submerged continent, and the two tectonic plates
  • Putting down a hāngi (earth oven)
    Putting down a hāngi (earth oven)
  • The Original All Blacks during the "haka", 1905
    The Original All Blacks during the "haka", 1905
  • New Zealand Division in 1916
    New Zealand Division in 1916
  • Vigil in Wellington for the victims of the Christchurch mosques attacks
    Vigil in Wellington for the victims of the Christchurch mosques attacks
  • Percentages of people reporting affiliation with Christianity at the 2001, 2006 and 2013 censuses; there has been a steady decrease over twelve years.
    Percentages of people reporting affiliation with Christianity at the 2001, 2006 and 2013 censuses; there has been a steady decrease over twelve years.
  • Tribute to the Suffragettes memorial in Christchurch adjacent to Our City. The figures shown from left to right are Amey Daldy, Kate Sheppard, Ada Wells and Harriet Morison
    Tribute to the Suffragettes memorial in Christchurch adjacent to Our City. The figures shown from left to right are Amey Daldy, Kate Sheppard, Ada Wells and Harriet Morison
  • The Māori are most likely descended from people who emigrated from Taiwan to Melanesia and then travelled east through to the Society Islands. After a pause of 70 to 265 years, a new wave of exploration led to the discovery and settlement of New Zealand.
    The Māori are most likely descended from people who emigrated from Taiwan to Melanesia and then travelled east through to the Society Islands. After a pause of 70 to 265 years, a new wave of exploration led to the discovery and settlement of New Zealand.
  • New Zealand in the South Pacific Ocean
    New Zealand in the South Pacific Ocean
  • Prime Ministers John Key and Helen Clark
    Prime Ministers John Key and Helen Clark
  • New Zealand children and young adult's author Margaret Mahy, July 2011.
    New Zealand children and young adult's author Margaret Mahy, July 2011.
  • George V with his prime ministers at the 1926 Imperial Conference. Standing (left to right): Monroe (Newfoundland), Coates (New Zealand), Bruce (Australia),Hertzog (Union of South Africa),Cosgrave (Irish Free State). Seated: Baldwin (UK), King George V, King (Canada).
    George V with his prime ministers at the 1926 Imperial Conference. Standing (left to right): Monroe (Newfoundland), Coates (New Zealand), Bruce (Australia),Hertzog (Union of South Africa),Cosgrave (Irish Free State). Seated: Baldwin (UK), King George V, King (Canada).
  • Water pollution sign on the Waimakariri River
    Water pollution sign on the Waimakariri River
  • The Mission House at Kerikeri is New Zealand's oldest surviving building, having been completed in 1822
    The Mission House at Kerikeri is New Zealand's oldest surviving building, having been completed in 1822
  • European settlers developed an identity that was influenced by their rustic lifestyle. In this scene from 1909, men at their camp site display a catch of rabbits and fish.
    European settlers developed an identity that was influenced by their rustic lifestyle. In this scene from 1909, men at their camp site display a catch of rabbits and fish.
  • The 1935 Labour Cabinet. Michael Joseph Savage is seated in the front row, centre.
    The 1935 Labour Cabinet. Michael Joseph Savage is seated in the front row, centre.
  • "First Scottish Colony for New Zealand" – 1839 poster advertising emigration from Scotland to New Zealand.  Collection of Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow, Scotland.
    "First Scottish Colony for New Zealand" – 1839 poster advertising emigration from Scotland to New Zealand. Collection of Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow, Scotland.
  • Pavlova, a popular New Zealand dessert, garnished with cream and strawberries.
    Pavlova, a popular New Zealand dessert, garnished with cream and strawberries.
  • Central Plateau in winter
    Central Plateau in winter
  • Māori whānau from Rotorua in the 1880s. Many aspects of Western life and culture, including European clothing and architecture, became incorporated into Māori society during the 19th century.
    Māori whānau from Rotorua in the 1880s. Many aspects of Western life and culture, including European clothing and architecture, became incorporated into Māori society during the 19th century.
  • Roger Douglas, the architect of New Zealand's 1980s neo-liberal reform programme
    Roger Douglas, the architect of New Zealand's 1980s neo-liberal reform programme
  • New Zealand is antipodal to points of the North Atlantic, the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco.
    New Zealand is antipodal to points of the North Atlantic, the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco.
  • A kapa haka performer
    A kapa haka performer
  • Richard Seddon, Liberal Prime Minister from 1893 to his death in 1906
    Richard Seddon, Liberal Prime Minister from 1893 to his death in 1906
  • The scalloped bays indenting Lake Taupo's northern and western coasts are typical of large volcanic caldera margins. The caldera they surround was formed during the huge Oruanui eruption.
    The scalloped bays indenting Lake Taupo's northern and western coasts are typical of large volcanic caldera margins. The caldera they surround was formed during the huge Oruanui eruption.
  • An annotated raised-relief map
    An annotated raised-relief map
  • HMS North Star destroying Pomare's Pā during the Northern/Flagstaff War, 1845, Painting by John Williams.
    HMS North Star destroying Pomare's Pā during the Northern/Flagstaff War, 1845, Painting by John Williams.
  • Hinepare of Ngati Kahungunu, is wearing a traditional korowai cloak adorned with a black fringe border. The two huia feathers in her hair, indicate a chiefly lineage. She also wears a pounamu hei-tiki and earring, as well as a shark tooth (mako) earring. The moko-kauae (chin-tattoo) is often based on one's role in the iwi.
    Hinepare of Ngati Kahungunu, is wearing a traditional korowai cloak adorned with a black fringe border. The two huia feathers in her hair, indicate a chiefly lineage. She also wears a pounamu hei-tiki and earring, as well as a shark tooth (mako) earring. The moko-kauae (chin-tattoo) is often based on one's role in the iwi.
  • An aerial view of the Auckland urban area, showing its location on the Hauraki Gulf
    An aerial view of the Auckland urban area, showing its location on the Hauraki Gulf

More Did you know? - show different entries

...that the Pompallier Mission is New Zealand's oldest industrial building and printed some of the earliest texts in Māori?

...that after HMNZS Canterbury was decommissioned by the Royal New Zealand Navy, the frigate was sold to a trust for a symbolic NZ$1 and then scuttled in the Bay of Islands by a former crewmember?

Selected article - show another

Ladyhawke in Perth, 2009
Phillipa "Pip" Brown (born in July 1979) better known by her stage name Ladyhawke, is a New Zealand singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist. She was formerly a part of the Wellington-based band Two Lane Blacktop, named for the 1971 road movie of the same name. Before assuming the name Ladyhawke, she formed the band Teenager with Nick Littlemore of Pnau and Empire of the Sun. Ladyhawke named herself after the 1985 Richard Donner film Ladyhawke. Ladyhawke is best known for her hit singles "Paris Is Burning" and "My Delirium". Her self-titled debut album was released on Modular Recordingsin September 2008. At the ARIA Music Awards of 2009, Ladyhawke won for Best Breakthrough single and album.

The Observer grouped Ladyhawke in with other singers gaining notice with their distinct fashion, 1980s references, and androgyny, including Lady Gaga, Little Boots, Lissy Trullie, and Elly Jackson's synth duo La Roux. (Full article...)

Selected weekly image

Tasman Lake has formed as the Tasman Glacier retreated over the last 20-30 years. Tour boats ply its grey waters, giving visitors a close encounter with the lake's many icebergs and a view of the glacier's snout. The glacier's barren lateral and terminal moraines line the rest of the lake's coastline. Aoraki/Mount Cook (at far left) overlooks the lake.

Did you know? - show different entries

  • ... that the New Zealand beetle Oemona hirta is called the "lemon tree borer", even though lemon trees are not native to New Zealand?
  • ... that New Zealand–born musician Millie Lovelock wrote her English literature master's thesis on One Direction?
  • ... that mezzo-soprano Patricia Payne made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in Ponchielli's La Gioconda, and took part in the first performance of Britten's Peter Grimes in New Zealand?
  • ... that New Zealand-born singer Rosé initially thought her father's suggestion that she audition to become a K-pop star was a joke, as the family lived in Australia?
  • ... that Rānui Ngārimu helped weave Te Māhutonga (the Southern Cross), the Māori cloak worn by the flag bearer of the New Zealand Olympic team since 2004?

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