The Plants Portal

The leaf is usually the primary site of photosynthesis in plants.
The leaf is usually the primary site of photosynthesis in plants.

Plants are predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom Plantae. Historically, the plant kingdom encompassed all living things that were not animals, and included algae and fungi; however, all current definitions of Plantae exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria). By one definition, plants form the clade Viridiplantae (Latin name for "green plants") which is sister of the Glaucophyta, and consists of the green algae. The latter includes the Embryophyta (land plants) which include the flowering plants, conifers and other gymnosperms, ferns and their allies, hornworts, liverworts, and mosses.

There are about 320,000 species of plants, of which the great majority, some 260–290 thousand, produce seeds. Green plants provide a substantial proportion of the world's molecular oxygen, and are the basis of most of Earth's ecosystems. Plants that produce grain, fruit, and vegetables also form basic human foods and have been domesticated for millennia. Plants have many cultural and other uses, as ornaments, building materials, writing material and, in great variety, they have been the source of medicines and psychoactive drugs. The scientific study of plants is known as botany, a branch of biology. (Full article...)

Cscr-featured.png
Featured articles

These are featured articles, which represent some of the best content on English Wikipedia.

Selected articles - load new batch

  • Grafting, 1870, by Winslow Homer — an example of grafting.
    Grafting, 1870, by Winslow Homer — an example of grafting.
  • Buds, capsules, flowers and foliage of E. tereticornis
    Buds, capsules, flowers and foliage of E. tereticornis
  • Colorized scanning electron microscope image of pollen grains from a variety of common plants: sunflower (Helianthus annuus), morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea), prairie hollyhock (Sidalcea malviflora), oriental lily (Lilium auratum), evening primrose (Oenothera fruticosa), and castor bean (Ricinus communis).
    Colorized scanning electron microscope image of pollen grains from a variety of common plants: sunflower (Helianthus annuus), morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea), prairie hollyhock (Sidalcea malviflora), oriental lily (Lilium auratum), evening primrose (Oenothera fruticosa), and castor bean (Ricinus communis).
  • Maize (Zea mays, Poaceae) is the most widely cultivated C4 plant.
    Maize (Zea mays, Poaceae) is the most widely cultivated C4 plant.
  • Image 8Genetically modified crops (GM crops) are plants used in agriculture, the DNA of which has been modified using genetic engineering methods. Plant genomes can be engineered by physical methods or by use of Agrobacterium for the delivery of sequences hosted in T-DNA binary vectors. In most cases, the aim is to introduce a new trait to the plant which does not occur naturally in the species. Examples in food crops include resistance to certain pests, diseases, environmental conditions, reduction of spoilage, resistance to chemical treatments (e.g. resistance to a herbicide), or improving the nutrient profile of the crop. Examples in non-food crops include production of pharmaceutical agents, biofuels, and other industrially useful goods, as well as for bioremediation.Farmers have widely adopted GM technology. Acreage increased from 1.7 million hectares in 1996 to 185.1 million hectares in 2016, some 12% of global cropland. As of 2016, major crop (soybean, maize, canola and cotton) traits consist of herbicide tolerance (95.9 million hectares) insect resistance (25.2 million hectares), or both (58.5 million hectares). In 2015, 53.6 million ha of GM maize were under cultivation (almost 1/3 of the maize crop). GM maize outperformed its predecessors: yield was 5.6 to 24.5% higher with less mycotoxins (−28.8%), fumonisin (−30.6%) and thricotecens (−36.5%). Non-target organisms were unaffected, except for Braconidae, represented by a parasitoid of European corn borer, the target of Lepidoptera active Bt maize. Biogeochemical parameters such as lignin content did not vary, while biomass decomposition was higher. (Full article...)
    Genetically modified crops (GM crops) are plants used in agriculture, the DNA of which has been modified using genetic engineering methods. Plant genomes can be engineered by physical methods or by use of Agrobacterium for the delivery of sequences hosted in T-DNA binary vectors. In most cases, the aim is to introduce a new trait to the plant which does not occur naturally in the species. Examples in food crops include resistance to certain pests, diseases, environmental conditions, reduction of spoilage, resistance to chemical treatments (e.g. resistance to a herbicide), or improving the nutrient profile of the crop. Examples in non-food crops include production of pharmaceutical agents, biofuels, and other industrially useful goods, as well as for bioremediation.

    Farmers have widely adopted GM technology. Acreage increased from 1.7 million hectares in 1996 to 185.1 million hectares in 2016, some 12% of global cropland. As of 2016, major crop (soybean, maize, canola and cotton) traits consist of herbicide tolerance (95.9 million hectares) insect resistance (25.2 million hectares), or both (58.5 million hectares). In 2015, 53.6 million ha of GM maize were under cultivation (almost 1/3 of the maize crop). GM maize outperformed its predecessors: yield was 5.6 to 24.5% higher with less mycotoxins (−28.8%), fumonisin (−30.6%) and thricotecens (−36.5%). Non-target organisms were unaffected, except for Braconidae, represented by a parasitoid of European corn borer, the target of Lepidoptera active Bt maize. Biogeochemical parameters such as lignin content did not vary, while biomass decomposition was higher. (Full article...)
  • The flower of Nymphaea alba, a species of water lily
    The flower of Nymphaea alba, a species of water lily
  • Rafflesia keithii flower
    Rafflesia keithii flower
  • Catnip flowers
    Catnip flowers
  • Flowering head of meadow foxtail (Alopecurus pratensis), with stamens exerted at anthesis
    Flowering head of meadow foxtail (Alopecurus pratensis), with stamens exerted at anthesis
  • An ethylene signal transduction pathway. Ethylene permeates the cell membrane and binds to a receptor on the endoplasmic reticulum. The receptor releases the repressed EIN2. This then activates a signal transduction pathway which activates regulatory genes that eventually trigger an ethylene response. The activated DNA is transcribed into mRNA which is then translated into a functional enzyme that is used for ethylene biosynthesis.
    An ethylene signal transduction pathway. Ethylene permeates the cell membrane and binds to a receptor on the endoplasmic reticulum. The receptor releases the repressed EIN2. This then activates a signal transduction pathway which activates regulatory genes that eventually trigger an ethylene response. The activated DNA is transcribed into mRNA which is then translated into a functional enzyme that is used for ethylene biosynthesis.
  • Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore maple) foliage
    Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore maple) foliage
  • Pearl millet in the field
    Pearl millet in the field

Selected picture

Adansonia grandidieri (Grandidier's Baobab), the biggest and most famous of Madagascar’s six baobabs, is an endangered species in the genus Adansonia. It is endemic to Madagascar. A. grandidieri is named to commemorate the French botanist and explorer, Alfred Grandidier (1836–1921).

Categories

Category puzzle
Select [►] to view subcategories

WikiProjects

Symbol support vote.svg
Good articles

These are good articles, which meet a core set of high editorial standards..

Did you know (auto-generated) - load new batch

Nuvola apps filetypes.svg
  • ... that adults and larvae of the green weevil damage a wide range of plants?
  • ... that the cucumber seeds that botanist Elwyn Meader brought back from Korea in 1948 became the basis for all modern cucumber hybrids grown worldwide?
  • ... that Lisa Ainsworth leads a project that involves studying plants under atmospheric conditions that are predicted for 2050?
  • ... that the palm scale was first found on an endemic species of palm on the island of Réunion, but now infests plants in at least 78 families around the world?
  • ... that the founder of the Cannabis Museum in Japan developed an interest in the subject after reading stories as a child in which ninjas trained by jumping over cannabis plants?
  • ... that the manga anthology Nanohana was inspired by efforts in Chernobyl and Fukushima to use plants to absorb radioactive material?
  • ... that by 2001, almost 2000 Trees For Life volunteers were growing 1.5 million plants every year?
  • ... that Pollichia campestris was first described in 1789 by the Scottish botanist William Aiton in the publication Hortus Kewensis, a catalogue of all the plants then being cultivated at Kew Gardens?

General images

The following are images from various plant-related articles on Wikipedia.

Related topics

Aleppo Pines grove, Pinet, Hérault 02.jpg
Ferns02.jpg

Related portals

Tasks

  1. Describe all families, genera and species of the kingdom Plantae.
  2. For species, describe botanical properties, distribution, multiplication, usage (medicine, food, etc.), botanical history, cultivation information.
  3. Develop and implement a robust method of naming plant article for the ease of navigation and searching for Wikipedia users.
  4. Maintain Category:Plants and its subcategories.

Associated Wikimedia

The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

More portals

Purge server cache