Pronethalol
Pronethalol.svg
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
  • Withdrawn
Identifiers
  • 1-(naphthalen-2-yl)-2-(propan-2-ylamino)ethanol
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC15H19NO
Molar mass229.323 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
ChiralityRacemic mixture
  • CC(C)NCC(C1=CC2=CC=CC=C2C=C1)O

Pronethalol (also known as nethalide or compound 38,174; trade name Alderlin) was an early non-selective beta blocker clinical candidate. It was the first beta blocker to be developed by James Black and associates at Imperial Chemical Industries, and the first to enter clinical use, in November 1963.[1]

However, it was never used widely due to carcinogenicity in mice, which was thought to result from formation of a carcinogenic naphthalene epoxide metabolite,[2] and was superseded by propranolol from 1965 onward.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Quirke V (January 2006). "Putting theory into practice: James Black, receptor theory and the development of the beta-blockers at ICI, 1958-1978". Med Hist. 50 (1): 69–92. doi:10.1017/s0025727300009455. PMC 1369014. PMID 16502872.
  2. ^ Stapleton MP (1997). "Sir James Black and propranolol. The role of the basic sciences in the history of cardiovascular pharmacology". Texas Heart Institute Journal. 24 (4): 336–42. PMC 325477. PMID 9456487.