R. Brooke Jackson
Senior Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Colorado
Assumed office
September 30, 2021
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Colorado
In office
September 1, 2011 – September 30, 2021
Appointed byBarack Obama
Preceded byPhillip S. Figa
Succeeded byvacant
Personal details
Born
Richard Brooke Jackson

(1947-03-05) March 5, 1947 (age 74)
Bozeman, Montana, U.S.
EducationDartmouth College (AB)
Harvard University (JD)

Richard Brooke Jackson (born March 5, 1947) known professionally as R. Brooke Jackson, is a Senior United States District Judge serving on the United States District Court for the District of Colorado. Jackson formerly had served as a Colorado state judge.

Early life and education

Born in Bozeman, Montana, Jackson earned an Artium Baccalaureus from Dartmouth College in 1969. He then earned a Juris Doctor in 1972 from Harvard Law School.[1]

Legal career

Jackson spent 26 years with the law firm Holland & Hart, including as an associate from 1972 until 1978, and as a partner from 1978 until 1998.[2] Jackson was appointed to the state bench in 1998, and in 2003 was named Chief Judge for Colorado's First Judicial District, which covers Jefferson County, Colorado and Gilpin County, Colorado.[2][1]

Federal judicial service

On September 29, 2010, President Barack Obama nominated Jackson to a judicial seat on the United States District Court for the District of Colorado, to fill the vacancy created by the death of Judge Phillip S. Figa.[3] Jackson's nomination lapsed at the end of 2010. President Obama renominated him on January 5, 2011. The United States Senate confirmed him by unanimous consent on August 2, 2011.[4] He received his judicial commission on September 1, 2011.[1] He assumed senior status on September 30, 2021.

Notable rulings

On June 5, 2020, Jackson issued a temporary restraining order against the City and County of Denver, Colorado, and the Denver Police Department in particular, forbidding assaults against peaceful protesters who participate in demonstrations against George Floyd's murder by the Minneapolis Police Department. The order included other police officers working with the City and County of Denver. Specifically, the order forbid using tear gas, pepper spray, pepper balls and rubber bullets against protesters unless a Captain is on scene, witnesses an act of violence, and gives an order to use them; and forbids the use of projectiles shot at protestors aimed at the head, back or pelvis. The order was requested because the police fired tear gas and rubber bullets on peaceful protesters because the police did not agree with the protester's message. The attacks with rubber bullets caused broken bones (including facial bones), ruptured scrotums (due to aiming at the groin), and included attacks on medics trying to render aid to injured protestors.[5][6][7]

References

  1. ^ a b c "Jackson, Richard Brooke – Federal Judicial Center". www.fjc.gov.
  2. ^ a b The White House: Office of the Press Secretary (September 29, 2010). "President Obama Names Two to the United States District Court". whitehouse.gov. Retrieved March 22, 2011 – via National Archives.
  3. ^ The White House: Office of the Press Secretary (September 29, 2010). "Presidential Nominations Sent to the Senate, 9/29/10". whitehouse.gov. Retrieved March 22, 2011 – via National Archives.
  4. ^ http://judiciary.senate.gov/nominations/112thCongress.cfm
  5. ^ Contreras, Óscar (June 5, 2020). "Judge puts strong restrictions on Denver police use of tear gas, pepper balls during protests". Denver 7. Retrieved September 21, 2021.
  6. ^ Spells, Alta (June 5, 2020). "Temporary restraining order prohibits Denver Police from using chemical agents or projectiles against peaceful protesters without supervisor approval". CNN. Retrieved September 21, 2021.
  7. ^ French, Leonard, Esq. (June 8, 2020). "Judge SLAMS Police for "Disgusting" Use of Tear Gas". Lawful Masses. Retrieved September 21, 2021.
Legal offices Preceded byPhillip S. Figa Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Colorado 2011–2021 Vacant