Rip It
Ripit.png
TypeEnergy drink
ManufacturerNational Beverage Corp.
Country of originUnited States
Introduced2004
Variants
  • 3-Way
  • A’tomic Pom
  • Citrus X
  • Citrus X (0 calorie)
  • Code Blue
  • CYP-X
  • F-Bomb
  • F-Bomb (0 calorie)
  • G-Force
  • G-Force (0 calorie)
  • Le-MOAN’R
  • Lime Wrecker
  • Power
  • Power (0 calorie)
  • Red Zone
  • Sting-Er-Mo
  • Tribute
Websitewww.ripitenergy.com

Rip It is an American brand of energy drink that is produced and distributed by National Beverage Corp.,[1] maker of Shasta, Faygo, and La Croix. It was introduced in 2004[2][3] and is National Beverage Corp.'s first energy drink.[4]

Marketed as "energy fuel at a price you can swallow,"[2] Rip It drinks have been referred to as a "bare-budget option", often costing $1 per can in the United States.[5] They have been supplied to US military personnel serving in Afghanistan and Iraq and have gained popularity there.[5][6]

Flavors and ingredients

The drinks come in a variety of flavors (13 different ones as of 2020[3]). There are sugar-free versions of some flavors as well as 2 fl oz shots. Some flavors are available in both 16 and 8 fl oz cans.[7]

The drink contains 160% daily value of vitamin C, 240% daily value of vitamin B6, and 830% daily value of vitamin B12 per 16 fl oz serving according to product packaging (purchase date: 2020-11-24). It also contains taurine, caffeine, inositol, and guarana seed extract. Sugar-free versions contain sucralose and acesulfame potassium.[8] Rip It drinks average about 160 mg of caffeine per 16 fl oz can, with the Le-MOAN’R flavor containing 204 mg of caffeine.[9] The 2 fl oz shot versions contain about 100 mg of caffeine, with some flavors containing as much as 135 mg.[10]

Sponsoring

In 2020, the brand sponsored the 100Talk Podcast, aimed fans of 100 Thieves esports.[11] They previously sponsored Olympic champion alpine skier Julia Mancuso in 2010[12] and the No. 16 car in the Automobile Racing Club of America driven by Joey Coulter in 2012.[13]

Support of U.S. military

The drink is popular and was widely consumed by U.S. forces in Afghanistan and Iraq.[14][15][6] In a 2016 interview, an Army staff sergeant noted that "over three-quarters of military personnel are drinking this stuff on the regular".[5] The brand highlights its support for the United States Military in its marketing.[16]

References

  1. ^ "Corporate". Rip It Energy Fuel official website. Retrieved 2020-12-21. Rip It Energy Fuel is part of the National Beverage family of brands((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  2. ^ a b "Rip It Energy Fuel Details". bevNET.com Brand Database. Archived from the original on 2020-12-21. Retrieved 2020-12-21. Rip it Energy Fuel brand established in 2004 […] the core brand's message "energy fuel at a price you can swallow"
  3. ^ a b "Rip It Energy Fuel". Shasta Foodservice. Retrieved 2020-12-21. Rip It Energy Fuel has been thriving since 2004((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ "National Beverage Corp". encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 2020-12-21. National Beverage entered this growing segment [energy drinks] with its Rip It line of energy beverages((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ a b c Fulton, Wil (2016-08-12). "How an Energy Drink You've Never Heard Of Took Over the US Military". Thrillist. Retrieved 2018-05-07. over three-quarters of military personnel are drinking this stuff on the regular […] it's mostly known as a bare-budget option, often costing $1 per can((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. ^ a b Rossen, Jake (2016-04-21). "How Rip It Became the Unofficial Drink of the U.S. Military". vanwinkles.com. Archived from the original on 2016-04-25. Retrieved 2017-01-31. Rip It can be found almost anywhere a soldier goes in the Middle East. It’s as common as an MRE.
  7. ^ "Our Brands". nationalbeverage.com. Archived from the original on 2017-01-07. Retrieved 2017-04-13. […] in fifteen regular and seven sugar-free flavors […] With 17 awesome flavors to choose from
  8. ^ "Rip It Review | How It works, Pros/Cons, In-Depth Reviews". Dietspotlight.com. Retrieved 2012-02-16.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ "Caffeine in Rip It Energy Drink". caffeineinformer.com. Retrieved 2017-03-31.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  10. ^ "Caffeine in Rip It Energy Shot". caffeineinformer.com. Retrieved 2020-12-21.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. ^ "100talkpod tweet". Twitter. 2020-06-26. Retrieved 2020-12-21.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  12. ^ "Julia Mancuso". The Official Site of the U.S. Ski Team. 2010-04-10. Archived from the original on 2010-04-10. Retrieved 2020-12-21.
  13. ^ "Joey Coulter Ready to Rip It Up at Talladega". catchfence.com. 2010-04-20. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved 2011-07-23.
  14. ^ Memmott, Mark (2009-06-26). "In Afghanistan: Coffee; Rip Its; And Tobacco". NPR. Retrieved 2012-02-16.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  15. ^ Tyson, Ann Scott (2009-05-22). "Generals Find Suicide a Frustrating Enemy". Washingtonpost.com. Retrieved 2012-02-16.
  16. ^ "Military Support". Rip It Energy Fuel official website. Retrieved 2020-12-21. For over a decade, we’ve supported the United States Military, serving RIP IT at home and downrange since 2004.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)