Road race
at the Olympic Games
AristidisKonstantinidis.jpg
The first road race winner, Aristidis Konstantinidis, in 1896
Overview
SportCycling
GenderMen and women
Years heldMen: 1896, 19362020
Women: 19842020
Reigning champion
Men Richard Carapaz (ECU)
Women Anna Kiesenhofer (AUT)

The road race is one of two road bicycle racing events held at the Summer Olympics, the other being the time trial. The road race is a mass start, distinguished from the separate starts of the time trial. The men's road race was first held at the 1896, was not held again for 40 years, then has been held every Summer Games since the 1936 Summer Olympics. The women's event was first contested at the 1984 Summer Olympics, being the first women's cycling event (track events were added in 1988).

A team event, with the results of the individual event being used to place the teams, was held from 1936 to 1956 (4 times).

Medalists

Men

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1896 Athens
details
Aristidis Konstantinidis
 Greece
August von Gödrich
 Germany
Edward Battell
 Great Britain
1936 Berlin
details
Robert Charpentier
 France
Guy Lapébie
 France
Ernst Nievergelt
 Switzerland
1948 London
details
José Beyaert
 France
Gerrit Voorting
 Netherlands
Lode Wouters
 Belgium
1952 Helsinki
details
André Noyelle
 Belgium
Robert Grondelaers
 Belgium
Edi Ziegler
 Germany
1956 Melbourne
details
Ercole Baldini
 Italy
Arnaud Geyre
 France
Alan Jackson
 Great Britain
1960 Rome
details
Viktor Kapitonov
 Soviet Union
Livio Trapè
 Italy
Willy Vanden Berghen
 Belgium
1964 Tokyo
details
Mario Zanin
 Italy
Kjell Rodian
 Denmark
Walter Godefroot
 Belgium
1968 Mexico City
details
Pierfranco Vianelli
 Italy
Leif Mortensen
 Denmark
Gösta Pettersson
 Sweden
1972 Munich
details
Hennie Kuiper
 Netherlands
Clyde Sefton
 Australia
Not awarded
1976 Montreal
details
Bernt Johansson
 Sweden
Giuseppe Martinelli
 Italy
Mieczysław Nowicki
 Poland
1980 Moscow
details
Sergei Sukhoruchenkov
 Soviet Union
Czesław Lang
 Poland
Yuri Barinov
 Soviet Union
1984 Los Angeles
details
Alexi Grewal
 United States
Steve Bauer
 Canada
Dag Otto Lauritzen
 Norway
1988 Seoul
details
Olaf Ludwig
 East Germany
Bernd Gröne
 West Germany
Christian Henn
 West Germany
1992 Barcelona
details
Fabio Casartelli
 Italy
Erik Dekker
 Netherlands
Dainis Ozols
 Latvia
1996 Atlanta
details
Pascal Richard
 Switzerland
Rolf Sørensen
 Denmark
Max Sciandri
 Great Britain
2000 Sydney
details
Jan Ullrich
 Germany
Alexander Vinokourov
 Kazakhstan
Andreas Klöden
 Germany
2004 Athens
details
Paolo Bettini
 Italy
Sérgio Paulinho
 Portugal
Axel Merckx
 Belgium
2008 Beijing
details
Samuel Sánchez
 Spain
Fabian Cancellara
 Switzerland
Alexandr Kolobnev
 Russia
2012 London
details
Alexander Vinokourov
 Kazakhstan
Rigoberto Urán
 Colombia
Alexander Kristoff
 Norway
2016 Rio de Janeiro
details
Greg Van Avermaet
 Belgium
Jakob Fuglsang
 Denmark
Rafał Majka
 Poland
2020 Tokyo
details
Richard Carapaz
 Ecuador
Wout van Aert
 Belgium
Tadej Pogačar
 Slovenia

Multiple medalists

Rank Cyclist Nation Olympics Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Alexander Vinokourov  Kazakhstan (KAZ) 2000–2012 1 1 0 2

Medalists by country

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Italy (ITA) 5 2 0 7
2  Belgium (BEL) 2 2 4 8
3  France (FRA) 2 2 0 4
4  Soviet Union (URS) 2 0 1 3
5  Netherlands (NED) 1 2 0 3
6  Germany (GER) 1 1 2 4
7  Switzerland (SUI) 1 1 1 3
8  Kazakhstan (KAZ) 1 1 0 2
9  Sweden (SWE) 1 0 1 2
10  East Germany (GDR) 1 0 0 1
 Greece (GRE) 1 0 0 1
 Spain (ESP) 1 0 0 1
 United States (USA) 1 0 0 1
 Ecuador (ECU) 1 0 0 1
15  Denmark (DEN) 0 4 0 4
16  Poland (POL) 0 1 2 3
17  West Germany (FRG) 0 1 1 2
18  Australia (AUS) 0 1 0 1
 Canada (CAN) 0 1 0 1
 Colombia (COL) 0 1 0 1
 Portugal (POR) 0 1 0 1
22  Great Britain (GBR) 0 0 3 3
23  Norway (NOR) 0 0 2 2
24  Latvia (LAT) 0 0 1 1
 Russia (RUS) 0 0 1 1

Women

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1984 Los Angeles
details
Connie Carpenter
 United States
Rebecca Twigg
 United States
Sandra Schumacher
 West Germany
1988 Seoul
details
Monique Knol
 Netherlands
Jutta Niehaus
 West Germany
Laima Zilporytė
 Soviet Union
1992 Barcelona
details
Kathryn Watt
 Australia
Jeannie Longo
 France
Monique Knol
 Netherlands
1996 Atlanta
details
Jeannie Longo
 France
Imelda Chiappa
 Italy
Clara Hughes
 Canada
2000 Sydney
details
Leontien Zijlaard
 Netherlands
Hanka Kupfernagel
 Germany
Diana Žiliūtė
 Lithuania
2004 Athens
details
Sara Carrigan
 Australia
Judith Arndt
 Germany
Olga Slyusareva
 Russia
2008 Beijing
details
Nicole Cooke
 Great Britain
Emma Johansson
 Sweden
Tatiana Guderzo
 Italy
2012 London
details
Marianne Vos
 Netherlands
Lizzie Armitstead
 Great Britain
Olga Zabelinskaya
 Russia
2016 Rio de Janeiro
details
Anna van der Breggen
 Netherlands
Emma Johansson
 Sweden
Elisa Longo Borghini
 Italy
2020 Tokyo
details
Anna Kiesenhofer
 Austria
Annemiek van Vleuten
 Netherlands
Elisa Longo Borghini
 Italy

Multiple medallists

Rank Athlete Nation Olympics Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Jeannie Longo  France (FRA) 1992–1996 1 1 0 2
2 Monique Knol  Netherlands (NED) 1988–1992 1 0 1 2
3 Emma Johansson  Sweden (SWE) 2008–2016 0 2 0 2
4 Elisa Longo Borghini  Italy (ITA) 2016-2020 0 0 2 2

Medallists by country

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Netherlands (NED) 4 1 0 5
2  Australia (AUS) 2 0 0 2
3  France (FRA) 1 1 0 2
 Great Britain (GBR) 1 1 0 2
 United States (USA) 1 1 0 2
6  Austria (AUT) 1 0 0 1
7  Germany (GER) 0 2 0 2
 Sweden (SWE) 0 2 0 2
9  Italy (ITA) 0 1 3 4
10  West Germany (FRG) 0 1 1 2
11  Russia (RUS) 0 0 2 2
12  Canada (CAN) 0 0 1 1
 Lithuania (LTU) 0 0 1 1
 Soviet Union (URS) 0 0 1 1

Men's team

A men's team event was held for four Games—1936, 1948, 1952, and 1956. It was not a separate competition, but an event that involved the results of the individual road race. The Belgian team, winners in 1948, were unaware that there was a team competition and left London without receiving their medals. For the first three editions of the event, the times of the fastest three cyclists (out of a maximum four individual competitors) for each nation were summed. In the final edition in 1956, a point-for-place system was used instead. In 1936 and 1948, only the top three cyclists for each team were awarded medals. In 1952 and 1956, all members of the team—including the cyclist whose score did not count—were medalists.

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1936 Berlin
details
 France (FRA)
Robert Charpentier
Robert Dorgebray
Guy Lapébie
 Switzerland (SUI)
Edgar Buchwalder
Ernst Nievergelt
Kurt Ott
 Belgium (BEL)
Auguste Garrebeek
Armand Putzeyse
Jean-François Van Der Motte
1948 London
details
 Belgium (BEL)
Lode Wouters
Leon De Lathouwer
Eugène Van Roosbroeck
 Great Britain (GBR)
Bob Maitland
Gordon Thomas
Ian Scott
 France (FRA)
José Beyaert
Alain Moineau
Jacques Dupont
1952 Helsinki
details
 Belgium (BEL)
André Noyelle
Robert Grondelaers
Lucien Victor
Rik Van Looy
 Italy (ITA)
Dino Bruni
Vincenzo Zucconelli
Gianni Ghidini
Bruno Monti
 France (FRA)
Jacques Anquetil
Alfred Tonello
Claude Rouer
Roland Bezamat
1956 Melbourne
details
 France (FRA)
Arnaud Geyre
Maurice Moucheraud
Michel Vermeulin
René Abadie
 Great Britain (GBR)
Alan Jackson
Arthur Brittain
William Holmes
Harold Reynolds
 United Team of Germany (EUA)
Horst Tüller
Gustav-Adolf Schur
Reinhold Pommer
Erich Hagen

Medalists by country

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  France (FRA) 2 0 2 4
2  Belgium (BEL) 2 0 1 3
3  Great Britain (GBR) 0 2 0 2
4  Italy (ITA) 0 1 0 1
 Switzerland (SUI) 0 1 0 1
6  United Team of Germany (EUA) 0 0 1 1

Intercalated Games

The 1906 Intercalated Games were held in Athens and at the time were officially recognised as part of the Olympic Games series, with the intention being to hold a games in Greece in two-year intervals between the internationally held Olympics. However, this plan never came to fruition and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) later decided not to recognise these games as part of the official Olympic series. Some sports historians continue to treat the results of these games as part of the Olympic canon.[1]

Fernand Vast won the 1906 title, with France sweeping the medals as Maurice Bardonneau finished second and Edmond Luguet third.[2]

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1906 Athens
details
 Fernand Vast (FRA)  Maurice Bardonneau (FRA)  Edmond Luguet (FRA)

References

  1. ^ 1906 Athina Summer Games. Sports Reference. Retrieved on 26 January 2014.
  2. ^ "Cycling: 1906 Intercalated Games Results". sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 28 January 2014.