Diocese of Anagni-Alatri

Dioecesis Anagnina-Alatrina
Vue d
Anagni Cathedral
Location
CountryItaly
Ecclesiastical provinceImmediately exempt to the Holy See
Statistics
Area787 km2 (304 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2018)
90,908
88,508 (97.4%)
Parishes56
Information
DenominationCatholic Church
Sui iuris churchLatin Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established5th century
CathedralBasilica Cattedrale di Maria SS. Annunziata (Anagni)
Co-cathedralBasilica Concattedrale di S. Paolo Apostolo (Alatri)
Secular priests35 (diocesan)
22 (Religious Orders)
3 Permanent Deacons
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopLorenzo Loppa
Website
www.diocesianagnialatri.it

The Diocese of Anagni-Alatri (Latin: Dioecesis Anagnina-Alatrina) is a Latin Church ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Catholic Church in Lazio, Italy. It has existed in its current form since 1986. In that year the Diocese of Alatri was united to the historical Diocese of Anagni. The diocese is immediately exempt to the Holy See.[1][2]

History

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (October 2016)

Despite the usual claims of foundation in the apostolic age, there is no evidence of Christianity in Anagni until the 4th century, and, as a bishopric, the diocese first appears in history in the fifth century.[3] Felix, Bishop of Anagni, was present at the Lateran Synod of Pope Felix III held in 487.[4]

In a later century the Bishopric of Anagni obtained some attention because its occupant received special consideration from the popes. Zacharias of Anagni was one of the legates of Pope Nicholas I at the Council of Constantinople in 861, to deal with the election of Photius to the patriarchate of Constantinople. Zacharias disobeyed his instructions, however, and entered into communion with the excommunicated schismatic Photius, and was therefore excommunicated himself and deposed from his bishopric of Anagni by Pope Nicholas, in his fourth Roman synod of 863.[5]

Stephen, a native of Rome and son of a Roman priest named Joannes, became Bishop of Anagni, and was consecrated by Pope Formosus (891–896). On the death of Formosus, and after the fifteen-day reign of Boniface VI (April 896), Stephen became Pope. He summoned and presided over the notorious "Cadaver synod", which put the dead body of Pope Formosus on trial, convicted him, and ordered his body thrown into the Tiber River.[6] Pope Stephen ruled for one year, three months, and eighteen days, and was then deposed, imprisoned, and strangled.[7]

Four natives of Anagni, all members of the same family, became popes: Innocent III (1198-1216);[8] Gregory IX (1227–1241);[9] Alexander IV (1254–1261);[10] and Boniface VIII (1294-1303). Numerous popes made Anagni their summer residence, or their refuge from Romans and emperors.[11]

According to a local legend of Anagni, Thomas Becket in his exile from England, was received in 1169 at Anagni by the canons,[12] and a chapel, which had once been a Mithraeum, was consecrated in his honor in the crypt of the cathedral, apparently at the request of Henry II of England.[13]

Pope Boniface VIII was violently attacked at Anagni by Guillaume de Nogaret, the chancellor of Philippe le Bel, and Sciarra Colonna. He was so badly treated that he died two weeks later, after having fled to Rome.[14]

Chapter

In 1244, Pope Innocent IV intervened in a jurisdictional dispute between Bishop Pandulfus and the cathedral Chapter, deciding that the bishop should not have the exclusive right to name the rectors of the city churches, but that the assent of the Chapter was required for all of the bishop's nominations.[15]

On 28 February 1251, Pope Innocent IV wrote to Bishop Pandulfus about the staffing of the cathedral Chapter; he had found that there was only one priest, and no deacons or subdeacons, actually seeing to services, and he authorized the bishop and the Canons to appoint two canons and two priests who were willing to reside at the cathedral.[16] A few years later, Pope Alexander IV (1254–1261) fixed the number of dignities in the Cathedral Chapter at three: the Primicerius, the Archpriest and the Vicedominus; the number of Canons was limited to twenty-four. The right to elect the Archpriest belonged to the Canons, not to the bishop.[17] The dignity of Provost was instituted by Pope Boniface VIII (1294–1303).[18] In 1708, the Chapter of the cathedral of S. Maria Annunziata had one dignity, the Provost, and twenty Canons.[19] The right of the Canons to elect a bishop was usurped by Pope John XXII in 1316.[20]

Diocesan synods

The Fourth Lateran Council (1216) decreed that provincial synods should be held annually in each ecclesiastical province, and that each diocese should hold annual diocesan synods.[21]

A diocesan synod was an irregularly held, but important, meeting of the bishop of a diocese and his clergy. Its purpose was (1) to proclaim generally the various decrees already issued by the bishop; (2) to discuss and ratify measures on which the bishop chose to consult with his clergy; (3) to publish statutes and decrees of the diocesan synod, of the provincial synod, and of the Holy See.[22]

A diocesan synod was held by Bishop Gaspare Viviani (1579–1605) on 4–5 March 1596.[23]

In 1630, Bishop Giovanni Gaspare Melis (1626–1642) presided over a diocesan synod, and in 1645, Bishop Sebastiano Gentile (1642–1646) held a diocesan synod.[24] Bishop Bernardino Masseri (1681–1695) held a diocesan synod in Anagni on 21–22 May 1685.

Bishop Giovanni Battista Bassi (1708–1736) presided over a diocesan synod, held in Anagni on 25–27 June 1713.[25] Bishop Cirillo Antonini (1778–1789) held a diocesan synod on 22–25 October 1780.[26]

On 1–3 September 1805, Bishop Gioacchino Tosi (1804–1815) presided at a diocesan synod in the Basilica Cathedral of S. Maria in Anagni.[27]

Bishops

Diocese of Anagni

This list is incomplete; you can help by adding missing items. (October 2016)

to 1200

...
...
...
[Petrus (593) forgery][30]
[Dominicus (595)][32]
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
[Luitardus][47]
...
...
...
...
...

1200 to 1700

[Nicolaus][64]
Sede vacante (1426–1429)
Oddo Potii de Variis (1426–1429) Apostolic Administrator[80]

from 1700 to 1987

Bartolomeo de Vulsinio, O.F.M.Observ. (1729–1736)[100]
Sede vacante (1815–1838)[107]
Luca Amici, Bishop of Ferentino (1815) Administrator
Francesco Maria Biordi, titular Bishop of Dulma (1816) Administrator[108]
Giuseppe Maria Lais, titular Bishop of Hippo (1817-1834) Administrator
Pier Francesco Muccioli, O.F.M.Conv., titular Bishop of Messene (1834–1838) Administrator

Diocese of Anagni-Alatri

Co-cathedral in Alatri
Co-cathedral in Alatri

30 September 1986 United with the Diocese of Alatri

References

  1. ^ "Diocese of Anagni-Alatri" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 23, 2016
  2. ^ "Diocese of Anagni-Alatri" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 14, 2016
  3. ^ Lanzoni, p. 166: "L'autore di una Vita di s. Pietro (BHL, 6699), vescovo di Anagni († 3 agosto 1105), dice della chiesa anagnina: « fundatam primitus apostolicis fundamentis, reparatam subventione dispositionis divinae »; ma si tratta di espressioni vaghe, comuni agli scrittori del XII e XIII secolo."
  4. ^ Mansi. VII, 1171.[full citation needed]
  5. ^ Pope Nicholas I's actions were fully explained in his letter (Epistle VII) to the Emperor Michael. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima editio, editio novissima, Tomus XV (Venice: A. Zatta 1770), p. 178-186. Ughelli I, p. 308. Cappelletti VI, p. 277.
  6. ^ Horace Kinder Mann (1910). The Lives of the Popes in the Early Middle Ages. Vol. IV, 891–999. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner. pp. 68–85.
  7. ^ Stephen's consecration by Formosus occurs first in the 15th century recension of the Liber Pontificalis; in earlier recensions he is only called "episcopus Campaniae", and there is no mention of consecration. Louis Duchesne (1892). Le Liber pontificalis: texte, introduction et commentaire (in Latin). Vol. II, pars 1. Paris: E. Thorin. p. 229.
  8. ^ Innocent was born Lothar dei Conti di Segni, and he had been a Canon of the cathedral of Anagni. De Magistris. Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale d'Anagni. pp. 136–138.
  9. ^ Ugo dei Conti di Segni was a nephew of Innocent III, and was also a Canon of Anagni. De Magistris. Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale d'Anagni. pp. 136–138.
  10. ^ In the bull "Ex Assumpto" of 8 September 1257, Pope Alexander recalls the details of his upbringing in Anagni; he had been a Canon of the cathedral Chapter: Ughelli I, p. 315. De Magistris. Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale d'Anagni. p. 194.
  11. ^ Alessandro De Magistris (1749). Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale d'Anagni (in Italian). Roma: nella stamperia di S. Michele per Ottavio Puccinelli. pp. 105–110.
  12. ^ The alleged visit is mentioned neither in Becket's correspondence nor in the lives written about him. De Magistris (1749), p. 107. John Morris (1885). The Life and Martyrdom of Saint Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury (second ed.). London & New York: Burns and Oates. p. 511.
  13. ^ Herbert L. Kessler (2019). Experiencing Medieval Art. University of Toronto Press. pp. 148, 151, 172. ISBN 978-1-4426-0074-4.
  14. ^ Julien Théry, "The Pioneer of Royal Theocracy. Guillaume de Nogaret and the conflicts between Philip the Fair and the Papacy", in: The Capetian Century, 1214-1314, ed. William Chester Jordan, Jenna Rebecca Phillips (Brepols, 2017), pp. 219-259. Richard A. Newhall (1921), "The Affair of Anagni," The Catholic Historical Review Vol. 7, No. 3 (October, 1921), pp. 277-295. Catholic Encyclopedia article. Ernest Renan (1872) "Un mininstre du roi Philippe le Bel: Guillaume de Nogaret. Première partie: L' attentat d'Anagni," Revue des Deux Mondes, Seconde période, Vol. 98, No. 2 (15 mars 1872), pp. 328-349.
  15. ^ De Magistris. Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale d'Anagni. p. 65.
  16. ^ Ughelli I, p. 314. Some of the incumbents were too old or too young to perform their duties, others were non-residential.
  17. ^ De Magistris. Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale d'Anagni. p. 65.
  18. ^ Cappelletti VI, p. 372.
  19. ^ Ughelli I, p. 306. Ritzler-Sefrin V, p. 83, note 1. The population of the city was c. 3,000 persons.
  20. ^ De Magistris. Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale d'Anagni. p. 64.
  21. ^ Capitula, VI. De conciliis provincialibus: J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima editio, editio novissima, Tomus XXII (Venice: A. Zatta 1778), p. 991.
  22. ^ Benedictus XIV (1842). "Lib. I. caput secundum. De Synodi Dioecesanae utilitate". Benedicti XIV ... De Synodo dioecesana libri tredecim (in Latin). Vol. Tomus primus. Mechlin: Hanicq. pp. 42–49. John Paul II, Constitutio Apostolica de Synodis Dioecesanis Agendis (March 19, 1997): Acta Apostolicae Sedis 89 (1997), pp. 706-727.
  23. ^ Constitutiones et decreta ecclesiae Anagninae. Edita, & promulgata in Synodo Dioecesana anno Domini 1596. a rev.mo D. Gaspare Viviano Vrbinati, ... episcopo. Roma: Typographia externarum linguarum 1597.
  24. ^ Both the acta of the synod of 1630 and the acta of the synod of 1645 are published in: Sebastiano Gentile (1645). Constitutiones, et decreta ecclesiae Anagninae edita, & promulgata in synodo dioecesana anno Domini 1645. A reuerendissimo d. Sebastiano Gentile Fulginatensi. Eiusdem Ecclesiae Dei, & apostolicae sedis gratia episcopo (in Latin). Foligno: apud Agustinum Alterium.
  25. ^ Dioecesana synodus ab illustriss. & reverendiss. D.D. Jo. Baptista Basso Anagniae episcopo, ... celebrata in ecclesia cathedrali diebus 25. 26. & 27. Junii anni 1713. Rome: J.M. Salvioni 1716 (in Latin).
  26. ^ Dioecesana synodus, quam, sub faustissimis auspiciis sanctissimi in Christo patris Pii papae sexti, illustrissimus ac reverendissimus dominus d. Cyrillus Antonini, Dei et apostolicae sedis gratia episcopus Anagninus, ejusdem sanctissimi domini nostri praelatus domesticus ac pontificio solio assistens, nec non Terrae Acuti dominus, coegit, et diebus XXII, XXIII, XXIV et XXV mensis octobris anni aerae vulgaris christianae MDCCLXXX bisextilis, ecclesiae suae servandam proposuit. Romae, MDCCLXXXI, apud Antonium Fulgoni.
  27. ^ Gioacchino Tosi (1805). Decreta synodi dioecesanae Anagninae habitae in Basili Cathedrali Sanctae Mariae kalendis, IV ac III non. mensis septembris anno post Christum natum MDCCV (in Latin). Roma: typis Lazarinii typographi.
  28. ^ Bishop Felix was present at the third Roman synod of Pope Felix III on 13 March 487. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima editio, editio novissima, Tomus VII (Florence: A. Zatta 1762), p. 1171. Lanzoni, p. 166, no. 1.
  29. ^ Lanzoni, p. 166, no. 2.
  30. ^ Petrus is said to have signed a diploma in favor of S. Medard; the diploma is a forgery. There was no Petrus. Lanzoni, p. 167.
  31. ^ Bishop Pelagius was present at the Roman synod of Pope Gregory I of 595. Lanzoni, p. 167, no. 3.
  32. ^ Ughelli I, p. 306, states that a Bishop Dominicus of Anagni was present at the Roman synod of 595. The manuscripts state that Bishop Pelagius of Anagni was present. Bishop Dominicus was Bishop of Civitavecchia. Gams, p. 663 column 1, questions the inclusion of Dominicus. Lanzoni, p. 167, positively rejects it.
  33. ^ Bishop Opportunus was present at the Roman synod of Pope Martin I, held at the Lateran Basilica in 649. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima editio, editio novissima, Tomus X (Florence: A. Zatta 1764), p. 867.
  34. ^ Bishop Mauritius subscribed to the synodical letter of Pope Agatho, sent to the Council of Constantinople in 680. Ughelli Italia sacra I, p. 307. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima editio, editio novissima, Tomus XI (Florence: A. Zatta 1765), p. 310. Cappelletti, Le chiese d'Italia VI, p. 276.
  35. ^ Bishop Gregorius attended the first Roman synod of Pope Gregory II on 5 April 721. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima editio, editio novissima, Tomus XII (Florence: A. Zatta 1766), p. 262. Cappelletti VI, p. 276.
  36. ^ Bishop Cesarius was present at the Roman synod of Pope Zacharias in 743 (The date of the synod is disputed; it may have been in 744). J.D. Mansi (ed.), Tomus XII, p. 384c. Cappelletti VI, p. 276.
  37. ^ Bishop Constantinus attended the Roman synod of Pope Paul I on 2 June 761. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Tomus XII, p. 384c. Cappelletti VI, p. 649. Cappelletti VI, p. 276.
  38. ^ Bishop Nigortius was present at the Roman synod at the Lateran of Pope Stephen III on 12 April 769. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Tomus XII, p. 384c. Cappelletti VI, p. 276.
  39. ^ Bishop Romualdus was present at the Roman synod of Pope Eugenius II on 15 November 826. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima editio, editio novissima, Tomus XIV (Florence: A. Zatta 1765), p. 999. Cappelletti, Le chiese d'Italia VI, p. 277.
  40. ^ Sebastianus was the immediate successor of Bishop Romualdus. He was bishop at the time of the Saracen invasions, which began in 847. Ughelli I, p. 307. Cappelletti VI, p. 277.
  41. ^ Nicholas: Ughelli I, pp. 307-308. Cappelletti VI, p. 277.
  42. ^ Zacharias was sent by Pope Nicholas I as his representative to Constantinople, but he failed to do the business for which he had been sent, and engaged in activities for which he had no warrant. He was deposed and excommunicated at the Roman synod of 863. He was later restored by Pope Adrian II. Cappelletti, Le chiese d'Italia VI, p. 277. Kehr II, p. 136, no. 1.
  43. ^ Alboinus: Ughelli I, p. 308. Cappelletti, p. 277. Gams, p. 663, column 1.
  44. ^ The deposed Zacharias was restored by Pope Adrian II (867–872). Kehr II, p. 136, no. 1, note.
  45. ^ Bishop Joannes was present at the Roman synod of Pope Leo VIII of 26 February 964, and at the Roman synod of Pope John XIII of 26 May 969. Schwartz, p. 268.
  46. ^ Joannes (II) was present at the Lateran synod of Pope John XV on 3 February 993. Schwartz, p. 268.
  47. ^ Ughelli I, p. 308, places Luitardus after Bishop Joannes, but offers no evidence. De Magistris, p. 126, places him in the time of Pope Silvester II, but offers no evidence. Schwartz, p. 268, notes the entry of Ughelli, but doubts his episcopacy. Alessandro De Magistris (1749). Istoria della città e S. Basilica Cattedrale d'Anagni (in Italian). Roma: Ottavio Puccinelli. p. 126.
  48. ^ Trasmundus: Schwartz, p. 268.
  49. ^ Rumaldus (Grimaldus): Schwartz, pp. 268-269.
  50. ^ Benedictus: Schwartz, p. 268.
  51. ^ Petrus reigned for 43 years, and died on 3 August 1105. On 4 June 1109, Pope Paschal II ordered the bishops of Campania to insert into their calendars the observance of the death of Saint Peter, Bishop of Anagni, on 3 August. Kehr, pp. 137-138, no. 8. Schwartz, p. 268.
  52. ^ Bishop Oddo (Ogdonus) attended the synod of Veroli in 1111. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima editio, editio novissima, Tomus XXI (Venice: A. Zatta 1776), p. 49. Ughelli I, p. 309. Cappelletti VI, p. 330. Schwartz, p. 268.
  53. ^ Petrus had been Archpriest of the cathedral of Anagni. He was the immediate successor of Bishop Petrus. Ughelli I, p. 309. Cappelletti VI, p. 330. Schwartz, p. 268.
  54. ^ Ojolinus had been Vicedominus of the cathedral of Anagni. He was the successor of Bishop Petrus. Ughelli I, p. 309. Cappelletti VI, p. 330-331. Schwartz, p. 268.
  55. ^ Bishop Raone assisted Anacletus II at the transfer of the remains and the consecration of the altar of S. Oliva in the cathedral of Anagni on 12 September 1133. Cappelletti VI, p. 331.
  56. ^ It is said that Lotarius is the same person as Eleutherius, found in a letter of Pope Anastasius IV to the Abbot of Montecassino. However Pope Anastasius addresses him as Lotarius in a letter of 30 September 1155. Cappelletti VI, p. 331. Kehr II, p. 138, no. 12.
  57. ^ Nuclerius: Kehr II, pp. 138-139, nos. 14-15.
  58. ^ Asahel attended the Second Lateran Council, held by Pope Alexander III in March 1179. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima editio, editio novissima, Tomus XXII (Venice: A. Zatta 1778), p. 213.
  59. ^ Joannes: Cappelletti VI, p. 334.
  60. ^ Ughelli I, pp. 309-310.
  61. ^ Joannes was consecrated a bishop by Pope Honorius III personally. Ughelli I, p. 310. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica I, p. 86 with note 1.
  62. ^ Albertus: Cappelletti VI, pp. 337-341.
  63. ^ Pandulfus: Cappelletti VI, pp. 341-345.
  64. ^ Ughelli I, p. 315 and 317, reports two Nicholases, one in 1257 and one in 1274, but without any documentation in either case. Cappelletti, p. 347, accepts the first Nicholas, and places him in 1257, but is vague as to the rationale. Gams, p. 663, lists the name Nicholas in 1257, but with a question mark. Eubel, p. 86, copies Gams' information. Both Gams and Eubel omit any reference to the second Nicholas, allegedly of 1274.
  65. ^ Bishop Joannes was already in office on 22 April 1257. Ughelli I, pp. 315-317. De Magistris, Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale, p. 129. Eubel I, p. 86.
  66. ^ Lando (or Landulfus) had been a Canon of the cathedral Chapter of Anagni. De Magistris, Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale, p. 129.
  67. ^ Petrus, the son of Matteo Caetani, was the uncle of Benedetto Caetani (Pope Boniface VIII). He was a Canon of the cathedral of Anagni. He was named Bishop of Sora, and in 1252 was transferred to Todi, and then to Anagni. He died in 1278. De Magistris, Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale, p. 129. Eubel I, p. 86.
  68. ^ Gerardus was elected Bishop of Anagni before 3 May 1289. Bishop Gerardus was transferred to the diocese of Spoleto by Pope Nicholas IV on 4 March 1290. He was transferred to the diocese of Arras (France) by Pope Boniface VIII on 28 March 1295. He died in 1316. Eubel I, pp. 86, 115, 461.
  69. ^ Bishop Petrus, O.P., a Spaniard, was transferred to Anagni from the diocese of Segni by Pope Nicholas IV, at the request of the Chapter of Anagni. De Magistris, Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale, p. 130. Eubel I, p. 87.
  70. ^ Petrus had been a Canon of Padua and chaplain of Pope Boniface VIII. He was consecrated on 20 September 1295. Bishop Petrus was transferred to the diocese of Aversa by Pope Boniface VIII on 3 August 1299. He died in 1309. De Magistris, Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale, p. 130. Eubel I, pp. 87, 123.
  71. ^ Leonardo of Anticoli (diocese of Anagni) had been a Canon of Anagni, then Vicedominus, Primicerius, and Archpriest. De Magistris, Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale, p. 130.
  72. ^ The Chapter of Anagni had elected Lando Catennacio Ferri, a fellow Canon, but he was rejected by Pope John XXII. Ferri was appointed on 7 April 1320, and consecrated by the pope personally. On 20 Mar 1327 Bishop Petrus was transferred by John XXII to the diocese of Marsi. De Magistris, Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale, p. 130. Eubel I, pp. 87, 327.
  73. ^ De Magistris, Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale, p. 130.
  74. ^ Pagnotta had been Vicar General of Pope Benedict XII, and had a part in the foundation of the hospital for incurables in Rome. De Magistris, Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale, p. 130.
  75. ^ Giovanni had been a Canon of the cathedral of Rieti. De Magistris, Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale, p. 130.
  76. ^ Grassini had been Bishop of Sorrento. He was transferred to Anagni on 5 November 1348 by Pope Clement VI. De Magistris, Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale, p. 130.
  77. ^ Jacobus was named Bishop of Anagni on 8 July 1399, by Pope Boniface IX. On 14 December 1401, Jacobus (Giacomo di Trevi) was named titular Bishop of Chalcedon (Turkey) by Pope Boniface, but he refused the appointment. Eubel I, pp. 87, and p. 183 note 4.
  78. ^ Afflitti: Eubel I, p. 87.
  79. ^ Fosco had been a chamberlain of Pope Martin V, who named him Abbot commendatory of the monastery of S. Maria de Gloria on 14 February 1418, and consecrated him a bishop at Mantua on 20 November 1418. Fosco was transferred to the diocese of Cava on 22 May 1426. Eubel I, p. 87 with note 9; 179.
  80. ^ Oddo was a native of Gennazzano (diocese of Palestrina), and was a subdeacon and, from 26 August 1426, the pope's treasurer. Eubel I, p. 87, note 10.
  81. ^ Francesco had been a Canon of the Basilica of S. Maria Maggiore in Rome, and was a personal friend of Pope Martin V. He was appointed Bishop of Anagni on 28 January 1429. He resigned in 1451. Eubel I, p. 87 with note 11.
  82. ^ Salvatore had been a Canon of the cathedral Chapter of Anagni, and held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure. Eubel II, p. 87.
  83. ^ Giovanni: 14 August 1478–September 1478?). Eubel II, p. 87.
  84. ^ Francesco was of a family of Todi, but was born in Benevento. He was a Canon of the Lateran Basilica in Rome. He was appointed Bishop of Anagni by Pope Innocent VIII on 13 October 1484. His successor was appointed in May 1502. Cappelletti VI, p. 361. Eubel II, p. 87 with note 2.
  85. ^ Ferdinando was a native of Gaziano. Cappelletti VI, p. 361. Eubel II, p. 87.
  86. ^ Bongalli was appointed Bishop of Anagni on 16 December 1515. On 5 November 1516, Bongalli was transferred to the diocese of Nepi e Sutri by Pope Leo X. Eubel III, p. 107 with notes 3 and 4.
  87. ^ Soderini resigned on 4 March 1523, in favor of his physician. Eubel III, p. 107.
  88. ^ Cardinal Carafa was already Archbishop of Naples. He was appointed Administrator of the diocese of Anagni on 16 December 1534 by Pope Paul III. He resigned the administratorship on 26 January 1541. Cappelletti, p. 362. Eubel III, p. 107.
  89. ^ Sarmiento was appointed administrator of the diocese of Anagni by Pope Paul III on 28 January 1541. He resigned the administratorship nine weeks later, on 6 April 1541. Cappelletti, p. 362. Eubel III, p. 107.
  90. ^ Torcella: Cappelletti, p. 362.
  91. ^ De Magistris. Istoria della città e S. Basilica cattedrale d'Anagni. pp. 132–133.
  92. ^ "Bishop Gaspare Viviani" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016.[self-published source]
  93. ^ Guarini was born in Piperno (diocese of Terracina). He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure. He was appointed Bishop of Anagni by Pope Paul V on 4 July 1605. He died before 25 June 1607, the date of the appointment of his successor. Cappelletti VI, pp. 363-364. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 82 with note 2.
  94. ^ Seneca was a native of Norcia. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure, and was a protonotary apostolic. He was a familiar of Archbishop Carlo Borromeo of Milan, and was Dean in the cathedral Chapter of Milan, as well as Borromeo's Vicar General. On 25 June 1607, he was appointed Bishop of Anagni by Pope Paul V. He held a diocesan synod He died in Rome on 11 (or 29) August 1626. Cappelletti VI, p. 364. Gauchat, p. 82 with note 3.
  95. ^ "Bishop Sebastiano Gentili" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved January 20, 2017.[self-published source]
  96. ^ On 9 December 1680, Castiglioni was transferred to the diocese of Acquapendente by Pope Innocent XI. Gauchat, p. 82.
  97. ^ Ritzler, Remigius; Sefrin, Pirminus (1952). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi (in Latin). Vol. V. Patavii: Messagero di S. Antonio. p. 83.
  98. ^ Gerardi: Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 83 with note 3.
  99. ^ Bassi: Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 83 with note 4.
  100. ^ Bartolomeo de Vulsino was appointed Coadjutor-bishop of Anagni and titular Bishop of Pompeiopolis on 23 March 1729 by Pope Benedict XIII. Vulsinio died before 5 December 1736. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 83 with note 3.
  101. ^ Bacchetoni was born at Preci (diocese of Spoleto) in 1689. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure from the University of Macerata (1719). He was a Canon of the cathedral Chapter of Spoleto. He held the post of Vicar General of the diocese of Spoleto, then of Fano, then of Todi, then of Rimini. He was appointed Vicar Apostolic of Anagni on 5 December 1736, due to the decrepit condition of Bishop Bassi. He was named Bishop of Anagni on 11 February 1737. On 1 December 1749 Bishop Bacchetoni was transferred to the diocese of Recanati e Loreto by Pope Benedict XIV. He died on 30 August 1767. Cappelletti VI, pp. 365-366. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 81 with note 2; 354 with note 3.
  102. ^ )On 14 April 1766, Monti was transferred to the archdiocese of Urbino. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 81 with note 3.
  103. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 81 with note 4.
  104. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 81 with note 5.
  105. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 81 with note 6.
  106. ^ Tosi had been Secretary of State for Latin Letters of Pope Pius VI. He pronounced the Pope's funeral oration in the Vatican Basilica in 1802, on the return of the papal remains from France. He was named Bishop of Anagni by Pius VII on 16 March 1804, and, on 3 April 1804, he was consecrated a bishop by Pope Pius. In February 1810, he was asked by Count Luigi Pecci of Carpineto to officiate at the baptism on his son, Gioacchino, but he had to decline. He was suspended from his episcopal functions by Pius VII on his return from captivity in France, on suspicion of his having become a Mason, and for having cooperated with the French occupation by taking oaths of loyalty and obedience; he was compelled to resign the diocese on 21 March 1815. He died in November 1837. Il divin salvatore periodico settimanale romano (in Italian). Vol. 17. Roma: Tip. Salviucci. 1881. p. 709. Ludwig von Pastor, The History of the Popes, from the Close of the Middle Ages, Volume 40, p. 393. Cappelletti, p. 366. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VII, p. 72. Gioacchino Giammaria, "La cospirazione patriottica nella Delegazione apostolica di Frosinone," AA. VV. (2013). Risorgimento e territori. Contributi al processo unitario dall'area laziale: ivista Storica del Lazio. Numero monografico. Rivista storica del Lazio XV-XVI (in Italian). Gangemi Editore spa. p. 168. ISBN 978-88-492-7541-4.
  107. ^ Cappelletti VI, pp. 366-367.
  108. ^ Biordi died on 7 October 1817.
  109. ^ Annovazzi was born in Civitavecchia in 1779. He was named titular Bishop of Leros (Aegean) and Auxiliary Bishop of Civitavecchia on 3 July 1826 by Pope Leo XII. On 15 February 1838, he was transferred to the diocese of Anagni by Pope Gregory XVI. He resigned on 12 February 1846, for reasons of health, and was appointed titular Bishop of Iconium (Turkey). He died on 4 August 1850. Cappelletti VI, p. 367. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VII, pp. 73, 237; VIII, p. 318.
  110. ^ Trucchi was born in Tivoli in 1807. He was a priest of the Congregation of S. Vincenzo di Paoli. He was appointed Bishop of Anagni on 21 September 1846 by Pope Pius IX. On 21 December 1857, Trucchi was transferred to the diocese of Forlì by Pope Pius IX. He died on 21 January 1887. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VIII, pp. 98, 275.
  111. ^ On 18 February 1931, Manuelli was transferred to the diocese of L'Aquila by Pope Pius XI.
  112. ^ On 31 January 1952, Piasentini was transferred to the diocese of Chioggia by Pope Pius XII.
  113. ^ On 9 March 1972, Compagnone was transferred to the diocese of Terracina-Latina, Priverno e Sezze by Pope Paul VI.
  114. ^ On 10 November 1973, Ottaviani was transferred to the diocese of Marsi by Pope Paul VI.
  115. ^ Loppa was born in Segni in 1947. He became a priest in 1971, and was named Bishop of Anagni on 28 June 2002. He was consecrated a bishop on 22 September 2002. Diocesi di Anagni-Alatri, "Vescovo"; retrieved: 13 April 2020.

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