Roy Adkins
Personal information
Born:(1898-10-05)October 5, 1898
Bement, Illinois
Died:February 10, 1975(1975-02-10) (aged 76)
Montclair, New Jersey
Height:5 ft 7 in (1.70 m)
Weight:180 lb (82 kg)
Career information
College:Bethany
Position:Guard
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Games played:4
Player stats at NFL.com · PFR

Roy S. Adkins (October 5, 1898 – February 10, 1975) was an American football player who played one season for the Decatur Staleys of the American Professional Football Association.[1][2] Adkins played college football at Millikin University and Bethany College.

In 1917, Adkins enrolled at Millikin and started at right guard for the Millikin Big Blue. The following year, he served in the United States Army for a three-month stint (October 21–December 31) before returning to Millikin.[3] In November 1919, he and teammate Sid Gepford joined the Staleys for their game against the Taylorville Independents; although they won, Millikin head coach Norman Wann was present and banned the two from playing for the Big Blue as they violated their amateur eligibility.[4][5] The two remained with the Staleys in 1920; Adkins was already working part time for the team's A. E. Staley parent company to pay for college.[3]

Adkins and Gepford later attended Bethany on the advice of a former Millikin line coach. Since Bethany did not care for amateur statuses, the two were also joined by former Staley teammates.[3][6] Adkins graduated in 1924 and later became a high school coach and businessman.[3]

His father Charles was a member of the United States House of Representatives.[3]

References

  1. ^ "Roy Adkins G, at NFL.com". NFL.com.
  2. ^ "Roy Adkins Football Statistics".
  3. ^ a b c d e "Roy Adkins". Staley Museum. Retrieved November 6, 2019.
  4. ^ "Two Millikin men out of athletics". Decatur Daily Review. November 13, 1919. Retrieved November 6, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "May dismiss Millikin men from school". The Decatur Herald. November 13, 1919. Retrieved November 6, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Sidney H. Gepford". Staley Museum. Retrieved November 6, 2019.