Salmon Tower Building
West 42nd Street - Bryant Park (buildings).jpg
General information
TypeCommercial
Location11 West 42nd Street, Manhattan, New York
Coordinates40°45′15″N 73°58′55″W / 40.75416°N 73.98194°W / 40.75416; -73.98194
Completed1928
OwnerTishman Speyer, Silverstein Properties
Height
Roof370 feet (110 m)
Technical details
Floor count31
Floor area932,101 square feet (86,595.0 m2)[1]
Design and construction
ArchitectYork & Sawyer
DeveloperWalter J. Salmon Sr.
References
[2][3][4]

The Salmon Tower Building is a 31-story skyscraper located at 11 West 42nd Street and 20 West 43rd Street in Manhattan, New York City, near Bryant Park. It was designed by Albert J. Wilcox and finished in 1928. It was developed by a firm headed by Walter J. Salmon Sr. Directly to the west of the Salmon Tower Building is the former Aeolian Building, and to its east is 500 Fifth Avenue, also built by Salmon Sr.

History

Walter J. Salmon Sr. headed a firm to erected the building, known as 11 West 42nd Street, Inc.[5] It was designed by Albert J. Wilcox.[6] The Salmon Tower Building was completed by early 1928, when its interior was more than 50 percent leased.[7] The New York City headquarters to elect Herbert Hoover as U.S. president in 1928 were located in the Salmon Tower Building.[8]

In September 1941, elevator operators in the building went on strike so only four of its eighteen elevators were operating on the morning of September 25.[9] In October 1952 a fire in the structure's subbasement caused five firemen to be overcome from smoke inhalation.[10]

Salmon Tower Building was sold by the estate of Charles Frederick Hoffman in June 1964, following an ownership of over sixty years. At the time its assessed value was $5.25 million and it was situated on a 34,309-square-foot (3,187.4 m2) land lot.[11] It is currently owned by Tishman Speyer & Silverstein Properties. In 1980 Tishman Speyer & Silverstein Properties collaborated on a $25 million renovation.[12]

Tenants

Former tenants

The offices of The New Yorker magazine were moved to the building from its longtime home at 25 West 43rd Street, just to the north, in 1991.[15] The magazine moved to 4 Times Square in 1999.[16] TV Guide moved into the space in 2007.[17]

References

  1. ^ "11 W 42nd St". 42floors.com. Retrieved July 4, 2019.
  2. ^ "11 West 42nd Street". The Skyscraper Center. Retrieved July 4, 2019.
  3. ^ "Salmon Tower". Emporis.com. Retrieved July 4, 2019.
  4. ^ "Salmon Tower". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved July 4, 2019.
  5. ^ "Salmon Tower Wall Not a 'Spite Fence'" (PDF). The New York Times. April 20, 1930. p. 149. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  6. ^ "Building That Fell Called 'Defective'" (PDF). The New York Times. March 11, 1937. p. 48. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  7. ^ "Rental Conditions in Central Zone" (PDF). The New York Times. January 29, 1928. p. 153. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  8. ^ "50 State Delegates Claimed for Hoover" (PDF). The New York Times. May 25, 1928. p. 3. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  9. ^ "Building Owners Reject Mediation" (PDF). The New York Times. September 26, 1941. p. 15. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  10. ^ "Five Firemen Overcome" (PDF). The New York Times. October 18, 1952. p. 36. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  11. ^ "Half of the Land is Sold Under Salmon Tower" (PDF). The New York Times. June 1, 1964. p. 45. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  12. ^ "History of Silverstein Properties, Inc. – FundingUniverse". www.fundinguniverse.com. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  13. ^ Hemingway, Jonathan (July 13, 2007). "Gemstar On The Move". Broadcasting & Cable. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  14. ^ "Visit Us". NYU School of Professional Studies. New York University. Retrieved October 31, 2016.
  15. ^ Shetterly, Caitlin (March 17, 2018). "These Days I Miss John Updike, a Remote and Noble Male Mentor". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  16. ^ Kuczynski, Alex (August 15, 1999). "Here to There at The New Yorker". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  17. ^ "Gemstar-TV Guide gets new digs". July 13, 2007.

Coordinates: 40°45′15″N 73°58′55″W / 40.75416°N 73.98194°W / 40.75416; -73.98194