Saryu Doshi
Born
OccupationArt scholar
Art historian
Curator
Known forMiniature art
Jain art
SpouseVinod Doshi
ChildrenOne son
AwardsPadma Shri
Women Achiever Award
ASI Lifetime Achievement Award

Saryu Vinod Doshi is an Indian art scholar, art historian, academic and curator, known for her erudition in Indian miniature paintings and Jain art.[1] She is the founder director of the National Gallery of Modern Art, Mumbai and a former pro-tem chairman of the Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi.[2] She is the author of several books[3] including Masterpieces of Jain Painting, a monograph on selected Jain art pieces.[4] The Government of India awarded her the fourth highest civilian award of the Padma Shri, in 1999.[5]

Biography

Saryu Doshi was born in Mumbai, in the western Indian state of Maharashtra and did her schooling at Queen Mary School, Mumbai.[6] Later, she graduated from the Elphinstone College and secured a diploma in Arts from the Sir Jamsetjee Jeejebhoy School of Art before marrying Vinod Doshi,[7] an industrialist from the Walchand Industrial Group and the son of Lalchand Hirachand,[8] who founded the Hindustan Aeronautics.[9] Though she stayed in Satara after the marriage, she visited Mumbai on a regular basis to keep in touch with the art circle of Mumbai. In 1972, she received the fellowship from the Rockefeller Foundation and pursued research on Indian miniature art and Jain art, for which she received a doctoral degree (PhD).[6] She served as a visiting professor of Art History and Culture at University of Michigan from January to April 1976 and returned to India and worked at the University of Pune for the first six months of 1978. She also had a stint at University of California, Berkeley in 1979, from March to June, as a visiting faculty.[1] Her researches have also helped in the discovery of many Jain manuscripts from the fifteenth century.[10]

In 1996, Doshi was among the art enthusiasts who founded the National Gallery of Modern Art, Mumbai and served as the founder director of the institution.[1] She took over the pro-tem chairmanship of the Lalit Kala Akademi in 1996 and held the post till 2002.[1] She has curated several art exhibitions in India[11] and is a former editor of non-profit publishing house of Marg, which published several of her books.[12] Besides Masterpieces of Jain Painting, she has also published three other monographs, namely, Dances of Manipur: The Classical Tradition, on Manipuri dance,[13] Dharna Vihara, Ranakpur, about the ancient Jain temples of Rajasthan[14] and Homage to Shravana Belgola, about the ancient Jain pilgrim centre.[15] Goa Cultural Patterns,[16] Shivaji and Facets of Maratha Culture,[17] A Collector's Dream : Indian Art in the Collections of Basant Kumar and Saraladevi Birla and the Birla Academy of Art and Culture,[18] The Indian Woman,[19] Homage to Karnataka,[20] Symbols and Manifestations of Indian Art,[21] Continuity and Change: Festival of India in Great Britain,[22] An age of splendour: Islamic art in India,[23] India and Greece, connections and parallels,[24] India and Egypt: Influences and Interactions,[25] Tribal India: Ancestors, Gods, and Spirits,[26] India: Week by Week (Kerala),[27] Images and Tradition - Festival of India in Great Britain (Volume XXXVI)[28] and Pageant of Indian Art: Festival of India in Great Britain[29] are her other publications. She is a member of the advisory council of the India chapter of the Asia Society[30] and has travelled extensively to deliver keynote addresses at several seminars in Europe, US, Africa and Asia. She has also given talks on BBC and All India Radio.[1]

The Government of India awarded her the civilian honour of the Padma Shri in 1999.[5] She received the Woman Achiever Award from the Bombay West Ladies' Circle in 2001 and the Art Society of India honoured her with Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006.[1] Vinod Doshi, her husband, died on 6 October 2008, leaving their son, Maitreya, with her.[8] She lives along Carmichael Road (later renamed as M. L. Dahanukar Marg), in South Mumbai.[7]

As trustee of the Vinod and Saryu Doshi Foundation, Doshi oversees the annual Vinod Doshi Theatre Festival, which showcases experimental theater productions from young and independent theater artists in the city of Pune, Maharashtra, India.[31]

Bibliography

  • Saryu Doshi, ed. (1981). Homage to Shravana Belgola. Marg Publications. p. 176. ISBN 978-0391025189.
  • Saryu Doshi (1982). Homage to Karnataka. Marg Publications. ASIN B001JATAQ0.
  • Saryu Doshi (1982). Shivaji and Facets of Maratha Culture. Marg Publications. ASIN B0022TPFMK.
  • Saryu Doshi (1983). Goa Cultural Patterns. Marg Publications. p. 152. ASIN B000BTNLNI.
  • Saryu Doshi (1983). Continuity and Change: Festival of India in Great Britain. Marg Publications. p. 113. ASIN B0000CQD33.
  • Saryu Doshi; Karl Khandalavala, eds. (1983). An age of splendour: Islamic art in India. Marg Publications. p. 149. ASIN B0000CQD3O.
  • Saryu Doshi, ed. (1984). Images and Tradition - Festival of India in Great Britain. Marg Publications. p. 100. ASIN B000KKLFCM.
  • Saryu Doshi, ed. (1984). Pageant of Indian Art: Festival of India in Great Britain. Smithsonian Institution Press. ISBN 978-9994253449.
  • Saryu Doshi (1984). Symbols and Manifestations of Indian Art. Marg Publications. ASIN B0017PR4XI.
  • Saryu Doshi (1985). India and Greece, connections and parallels. Marg Publications. ASIN B001RBZI2Q.
  • Khandlavala, Karl; Doshi, Saryu, eds. (1987). A Collector's Dream : Indian Art in the Collections of Basant Kumar and Saraladevi Birla and the Birla Academy of Art and Culture. Marg Publications. ASIN B0022TIJIM.
  • Saryu Doshi (1987). The Indian Woman. The Department of Women and Child Development. ASIN B0007C6MNK.
  • Saryu Doshi; Maureen Liebl (1988). India: Week by Week (Kerala). Media Transasia. ASIN B00123QN6Y.
  • Saryu Doshi (1989). Dances of Manipur: The Classical Tradition. Gaudiya Vedanta Publications. p. 128. ISBN 978-8185026091.
  • Saryu Doshi, ed. (1992). Tribal India: Ancestors, Gods, and Spirits. South Asia Books. p. 136. ISBN 978-8185026183.
  • Saryu Doshi (1993). India and Egypt: Influences and Interactions. South Asia Books. p. 35. ISBN 978-8185026237.
  • Saryu Doshi (1996). Dharna Vihara, Ranakpur. Axel Menges. p. 63. ISBN 978-3930698172.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Dr. Saryu Doshi". Baajaa Gaajaa. 2015. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  2. ^ "Paradise as a garden". Europalia India. 2015. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  3. ^ "Amazon profile". Amazon. 2015. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  4. ^ Saryu Doshi (1995). Masterpieces of Jain Painting. Marg Publications. p. 150. ASIN B0012GXJ8G.
  5. ^ a b "Padma Awards" (PDF). Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India. 2015. Retrieved 21 July 2015.
  6. ^ a b "Saryu Doshi - high priestess of the art world". DNA Syndicate. 1 October 2005. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  7. ^ a b "Roots - Dr Saryu Doshi". Times of India. 27 September 2002. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  8. ^ a b "Industrialist Vinod Doshi passes away". Rediff. 7 October 2008. Retrieved 29 October 2015.
  9. ^ "Hindustan Aeronatuics" (PDF). Flight Global. 2015. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  10. ^ Wendell Charles Beane. Leiden: E. J. Brill (1979). "Myth, Cult and Symbols of Śākta Hinduism: A Study of the Indian Mother Goddess". The Journal of Asian Studies. 38 (3): 597–599. doi:10.2307/2053812. JSTOR 2053812.
  11. ^ "India Art Festival". India Art Festival. 2015. Retrieved 29 October 2015.
  12. ^ "Past Editors". Marg. 2015. Retrieved 29 October 2015.
  13. ^ Saryu Doshi (1989). Dances of Manipur: The Classical Tradition. Gaudiya Vedanta Publications. p. 128. ISBN 978-8185026091.
  14. ^ Saryu Doshi (1996). Dharna Vihara, Ranakpur. Axel Menges. p. 63. ISBN 978-3930698172.
  15. ^ Saryu Doshi, ed. (1981). Homage to Shravana Belgola. Marg Publications. p. 176. ISBN 978-0391025189.
  16. ^ Saryu Doshi (1983). Goa Cultural Patterns. Marg Publications. p. 152. ASIN B000BTNLNI.
  17. ^ Saryu Doshi (1982). Shivaji and Facets of Maratha Culture. Marg Publications. ASIN B0022TPFMK.
  18. ^ Khandlavala, Karl; Doshi, Saryu, eds. (1987). A Collector's Dream : Indian Art in the Collections of Basant Kumar and Saraladevi Birla and the Birla Academy of Art and Culture. Marg Publications. ASIN B0022TIJIM.
  19. ^ Saryu Doshi (1987). The Indian Woman. The Department of Women and Child Development. ASIN B0007C6MNK.
  20. ^ Saryu Doshi (1982). Homage to Karnataka. Marg Publications. ASIN B001JATAQ0.
  21. ^ Saryu Doshi (1984). Symbols and Manifestations of Indian Art. Marg Publications. ASIN B0017PR4XI.
  22. ^ Saryu Doshi (1983). Continuity and Change: Festival of India in Great Britain. Marg Publications. p. 113. ASIN B0000CQD33.
  23. ^ Saryu Doshi; Karl Khandalavala, eds. (1983). An age of splendour: Islamic art in India. Marg Publications. p. 149. ASIN B0000CQD3O.
  24. ^ Saryu Doshi (1985). India and Greece, connections and parallels. Marg Publications. ASIN B001RBZI2Q.
  25. ^ Saryu Doshi (1993). India and Egypt: Influences and Interactions. South Asia Books. p. 35. ISBN 978-8185026237.
  26. ^ Saryu Doshi, ed. (1992). Tribal India: Ancestors, Gods, and Spirits. South Asia Books. p. 136. ISBN 978-8185026183.
  27. ^ Saryu Doshi; Maureen Liebl (1988). India: Week by Week (Kerala). Media Transasia. ASIN B00123QN6Y.
  28. ^ Saryu Doshi, ed. (1984). Images and Tradition - Festival of India in Great Britain. Marg Publications. p. 100. ASIN B000KKLFCM.
  29. ^ Saryu Doshi, ed. (1984). Pageant of Indian Art: Festival of India in Great Britain. Smithsonian Institution Press. ISBN 978-9994253449.
  30. ^ "Advisory council". Asia Society India. 2015. Retrieved 29 October 2015.
  31. ^ "Multilingual theatre festival to kick off on February 22". The Indian Express. 11 February 2016. Retrieved 27 March 2017.