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Scott Mitchell
No. 19
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born: (1968-01-02) January 2, 1968 (age 54)
Salt Lake City, Utah
Height:6 ft 6.5 in (1.99 m)
Weight:249 lb (113 kg)
Career information
High school:Springville
(Springville, Utah)
College:Utah
NFL Draft:1990 / Round: 4 / Pick: 93
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Pass completions:1,301
Pass attempts:2,346
Percentage:55.5
Passing yards:15,692
TDINT:95–81
Passer rating:75.3
Player stats at NFL.com · PFR

William Scott Mitchell (born January 2, 1968)[1] is a former professional American football player who was a quarterback in the National Football League for 12 seasons. He played for the Miami Dolphins, Detroit Lions, Baltimore Ravens and Cincinnati Bengals of the NFL, and also the Orlando Thunder of the World League of American Football. Mitchell played college football for the University of Utah.

College career

Mitchell played for the Utah Utes.

Statistics

Year Team Passing Rushing
Cmp Att Pct Yds Y/A TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD
1987 Utah 109 188 58.0 1,448 7.7 9 4 134.2 21 -44 -2.1 1
1988 Utah 323 533 60.6 4,322 8.1 29 15 141.0 56 -23 -0.4 0
1989 Utah 237 444 53.4 3,211 7.2 31 19 128.6 64 -78 -1.2 2
Career 669 1,165 57.4 8,981 7.7 69 38 135.2 141 -145 -1.0 3

Source:[2]

Professional career

Mitchell was selected by the Miami Dolphins in the fourth round (93rd overall) of the 1990 NFL Draft. After serving three years as Dan Marino's back-up, Mitchell became the Dolphins' starting quarterback for the balance of the 1993 season when Marino was injured in week 6 at Cleveland; the team would miss the playoffs that season.

Mitchell was signed as a free agent by the Detroit Lions in 1994. Mitchell led a Detroit offense that included running back Barry Sanders and receivers Herman Moore and Brett Perriman. However, in 1994—his first season as a starter for the Lions—Mitchell struggled. In a loss to the Green Bay Packers, Mitchell went down with an injury,[3] and was replaced by backup quarterback Dave Krieg, who led the team to the 1994 playoffs. Offensive tackle Lomas Brown, on ESPN program First Take later admitted to purposefully missing a block that resulted in this injury, as he was upset over Mitchell's poor play.[4] However, a review of game film and play-by-play logs of the game by football historian Andy Barall fails to corroborate Brown's recollection of what occurred.[5] Mitchell regained his starting position the following year.

In 1995, he set single-season records for the Lions in touchdown passes (32) and passing yards (4,338), both of which were later eclipsed by Matthew Stafford. Mitchell's Lions made the NFL playoffs in 1995 and 1997. Mitchell stayed with the Lions through the 1998 season, when he lost the starting quarterback job to rookie Charlie Batch.

Made expendable after the Lions signed Gus Frerotte two weeks earlier, Mitchell was dealt to the Baltimore Ravens on March 16, 1999 for a third-round draft pick that year and a fifth-rounder in 2000. After not being able to acquire Brad Johnson from the Minnesota Vikings,[6] the Ravens settled for Mitchell who signed a one-year $3 million contract upon his arrival in Baltimore.[7] He completed 24 of 56 passes for 236 yards, threw a touchdown pass and was intercepted four times before Stoney Case replaced him as starting quarterback during the third quarter of a 23–20 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers in a Week 2 home opener at PSINet Stadium on September 19.[8] He saw no further action with the Ravens and became an unrestricted free agent following the 1999 season.[9]

Mitchell signed with the Cincinnati Bengals on March 9, 2000. He was the veteran backup to Akili Smith after Jeff Blake signed as a free agent with the New Orleans Saints.[10] He retired as an active player following the 2001 season.

NFL career statistics

Year Team GP Cmp Att Pct Yds Y/A TD Int Lng Fum Rtg
1992 MIA 16 2 8 25.0 32 4.00 0 1 18 0 4.2
1993 MIA 13 133 233 57.1 1,773 7.61 12 8 77 1 84.2
1994 DET 9 119 246 48.4 1,456 5.92 10 11 34 6 62.0
1995 DET 16 346 583 59.3 4,338 7.44 32 12 91 7 92.3
1996 DET 14 253 437 57.9 2,917 6.68 17 17 62 8 74.9
1997 DET 16 293 509 57.6 3,484 6.85 19 14 79 8 79.6
1998 DET 2 38 75 50.7 452 6.03 1 3 44 0 57.2
1999 BAL 2 24 56 42.9 236 4.21 1 4 28 1 31.5
2000 CIN 8 89 187 47.6 966 5.17 3 8 38 3 50.8
2001 CIN 1 4 12 33.3 38 3.17 0 3 16 0 3.5
Career 97 1,301 2,346 55.5 15,692 6.69 95 81 34 81 75.3

Source:[11]

Coaching career

In February 2008, Mitchell was announced as the head football coach of his alma mater, Springville High School in Utah.[12] He stepped down from his coaching position in January 2012 to spend more time on his software business.[13]

Personal life

In 2014, Mitchell had reached 366 pounds (166 kg). He was a contestant on Season 16 of the reality competition The Biggest Loser, titled The Biggest Loser: Glory Days, which premiered on September 11, 2014 on NBC. He was eliminated in week 15 as the last player eliminated from "comeback canyon", losing his final weigh in to Howard "Woody" Carter. Mitchell is an Eagle Scout.[14]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Scott Mitchell NFL & AFL Football Statistics". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved July 23, 2011.
  2. ^ "Scott Mitchell". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 6, 2016.
  3. ^ Busbee, Jay (2012-12-23). "Lions lineman Lomas Brown confesses he once let quarterback Scott Mitchell get injured". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved 2012-12-23.
  4. ^ "The Lions' Lomas Brown Says He Deliberately Let QB Scott Mitchell Get Injured In 1994". 22 December 2012. Retrieved 27 December 2012.
  5. ^ Barall, Andy (2012), "Lomas Brown, Scott Mitchell and What the Tape Reveals", The New York Times, retrieved December 28, 2012
  6. ^ "Report: Lions send Mitchell to Ravens," United Press International (UPI), Tuesday, March 16, 1999. Retrieved June 9, 2022.
  7. ^ Preston, Mike. "Mitchell believes his time is now; Ravens' new QB feels he is at peak of career," The Baltimore Sun, Thursday, March 18, 1999. Retrieved June 9, 2022.
  8. ^ "Case named to replace Mitchell," The Associated Press (AP), Tuesday, September 21, 1999. Retrieved June 9, 2022.
  9. ^ "NFL Notes," The Washington Post, Friday, March 10, 2000. Retrieved June 9, 2022.
  10. ^ "Bengals ink Scott Mitchell," United Press International (UPI), Thursday, March 9, 2000. Retrieved June 9, 2022.
  11. ^ "Scott Mitchell Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved April 29, 2014.
  12. ^ Rayburn, Jim (February 8, 2008). "Coming home: Mitchell returns to coach Springville". Deseret News. Retrieved July 23, 2011.
  13. ^ Zundel, Rod (January 27, 2012). "Scott Mitchell resigns as Springville head coach".
  14. ^ What's it Take to be a Pro Quarterback in the NFL?. Boy Scouts of America. Archived from the original on 2021-12-19.