Simutronics Corp.
Company typePrivate company
IndustryVideo games
FoundedSt. Louis, Missouri, U.S. (1987)
HeadquartersSt. Louis, Missouri, U.S.
OwnerStillfront Group[1] (55.06%)
Number of employees
30
WebsiteSimutronics Official Site

Simutronics is an American online games company whose products include GemStone IV and DragonRealms. It was founded in 1987 by David Whatley, with husband and wife Tom & Susan Zelinski. The company is located in St. Louis, Missouri.[2] It became part of the Stillfront Group in 2016.

The company's flagship product is the text based game, GemStone IV, which went live in November 2003, with predecessor games running back in 1988. GemStone was originally accessed through General Electric's internet service provider GEnie, later becoming accessible through AOL, Prodigy, and CompuServe before Simutronics finally moved all their games to their own domain in 1997.

Simutronics products

Multiplayer online games

Mobile games

HeroEngine

Main article: HeroEngine

HeroEngine is a 3D game engine and server technology platform developed specifically for building MMO-style games, based around a system similar to the IFE using the Hero Script Language (HSL). Originally developed for the company's own game Hero's Journey - which never made it to the testing stage - the engine has since been licensed by other companies.[12] Simutronics sold the HeroEngine to Idea Fabrik, Plc. on August 5, 2010.[13]

References

  1. ^ "Stillfront Group". 25 April 2024.
  2. ^ McCrary, William S. (January 9, 1994). "Games People Play". St. Charles Journal.
  3. ^ "Facts about early Avalon the Legend Lives".
  4. ^ "Raph Koster's Timeline of Online Worlds". 13 January 2014.
  5. ^ Olivetti, Justin (2011-04-19). "The Game Archaeologist plays with MUDs: The games". Massively. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2011-04-25.
  6. ^ "CGW's Game of the Year Awards" (PDF). Computer Gaming World. No. 111. October 1993. pp. 70–74.
  7. ^ Campbell, Nissa (9 September 2011). "Tiny Heroes Review". Touch Arcade.
  8. ^ "Run for Gold! One Epic Knight Launch Date Announced, Sprints for Free onto iOS Devices August 23". Gamasutra. 14 August 2012.
  9. ^ Ward, Brad (5 June 2013). "The 6 most underrated games for Android: May 2013 edition". Android Authority.
  10. ^ Suckley, Matt (2017-07-06). "Simutronics on Siege: Titan Wars and 30 years of multiplayer gaming". pocketgamer.biz. Retrieved 2024-06-06.
  11. ^ Larsson, Jörgen (19 September 2018). "Stillfront Group AB: Simutronics announces "SIEGE: World War II"". stillfront.com.
  12. ^ "BioWare Licenses Simutronics HeroEngine for MMO Game Project" (Press release). Austin Game Conference 2006: Business Wire. August 8, 2006.((cite press release)): CS1 maint: location (link)
  13. ^ Brand, Wolfgang (5 August 2010). "Idea Fabrik Plc purchases HeroEngine technologies".

Sources

  • Austin, Nancy K. (15 October 1999). "Pure Internet Play". Inc. Magazine.
  • Bartle, Richard (2003). Designing Virtual Worlds. New Riders. ISBN 0-13-101816-7.
  • Kim, Amy Jo (2000). Community Building on the Web. Peachpit Press. ISBN 0-201-87484-9.
  • "Recruiting Strategies: Motivation". Inc. Magazine. 15 October 1999. THE BRIGHT SIDE OF THE FORCE: With all the hype that surrounded the opening of Star Wars: Episode I --The Phantom Menace, it's no surprise that the film created a minor truancy problem for some companies. Like numerous other CEOs whose companies made this year's list, David Whatley of Simutronics Corp. (#295), in Rockville, Md., decided to do a preemptive strike. "I thought it would be more cost-effective to see the movie as a group," he says. "It was either that or have people call in sick for a week."