Sioux County
Postcard. Historic Sioux County Courthouse at Fort Yates, North Dakota.
Map of North Dakota highlighting Sioux County
Location within the U.S. state of North Dakota
Map of the United States highlighting North Dakota
North Dakota's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 46°07′N 101°03′W / 46.11°N 101.05°W / 46.11; -101.05
Country United States
State North Dakota
FoundedSeptember 3, 1914 (created)
September 12, 1914 (organized)
Named forSioux people
SeatFort Yates
Largest communityCannon Ball
Area
 • Total1,128 sq mi (2,920 km2)
 • Land1,094 sq mi (2,830 km2)
 • Water34 sq mi (90 km2)  3.0%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total3,898
 • Estimate 
(2021)
3,738
 • Density3.5/sq mi (1.3/km2)
Time zones
(eastern portion)UTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
(western portion)UTC−7 (Mountain)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−6 (MDT)

Sioux County is a county located along the southern border of the U.S. state of North Dakota. As of the 2020 census, the population was 3,898.[1] Its eastern border is the Missouri River and its county seat is Fort Yates.[2]

History

The county was created by proclamation of Governor Louis B. Hanna on September 3, 1914. It was named for the Native American Lakota, whose historic territory included this area. The county government organization was completed on September 12 of that year.[3] The county lies entirely within the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, forming the northernmost 30 percent of the reservation; the balance of the reservation is in South Dakota. It is the only county in North Dakota that is entirely within an Indian reservation. From 2013 to 2018, Sioux County was included in the Bismarck, ND Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography

Sioux County lies on the south line of North Dakota. Its south boundary line abuts the north boundary line of the state of South Dakota. Its north boundary line is formed by the east-northeastward-flowing Cedar Creek, which discharges into the Missouri River at the county's northeast corner, and its east boundary line is formed by the south-southeast-flowing Missouri River, which also forms Lake Oahe along the county boundary line. Porcupine Creek flows southeastward into the Missouri River, draining the northeastern part of the county. The county terrain consists of low rolling hills etched with gullies and drainages; the area is mostly devoted to agriculture.[4] The terrain slopes to the east and south; its highest point is on the west line, near the southwestern corner of the county, at 2,602' (793m) ASL.[5] The county has a total area of 1,128 square miles (2,920 km2), of which 1,094 square miles (2,830 km2) is land and 34 square miles (88 km2) (3.0%) is water.[6]

The southwest corner counties of North Dakota (Adams, Billings, Bowman, Golden Valley, Grant, Hettinger, Slope, and Stark) observe Mountain Time. The counties of McKenzie, Dunn, and Sioux are split, observing Mountain Time in their western portions.

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
19203,308
19304,68741.7%
19404,419−5.7%
19503,696−16.4%
19603,662−0.9%
19703,632−0.8%
19803,620−0.3%
19903,7613.9%
20004,0447.5%
20104,1532.7%
20203,898−6.1%
2021 (est.)3,738−4.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2020[1]

2000 census

As of the 2000 census, there were 4,044 people, 1,095 households, and 871 families in the county. The population density was 3.70/sqmi (1.42/km2). There were 1,216 housing units at an average density of 1.11/sqmi (0.43/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 84.59% Native American, 14.34% White, 0.02% Black or African American, 0.02% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.07% from other races, and 0.89% from two or more races. 1.61% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 11.5% were of German ancestry.

There were 1,095 households, out of which 48.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.10% were married couples living together, 29.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.40% were non-families. 16.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.63 and the average family size was 3.98.

The county population contained 40.30% under the age of 18, 11.10% from 18 to 24, 26.90% from 25 to 44, 16.20% from 45 to 64, and 5.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 24 years. For every 100 females there were 104.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $22,483, and the median income for a family was $24,000. Males had a median income of $22,039 versus $19,458 for females. The per capita income for the county was $7,731. About 33.60% of families and 39.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 44.40% of those under age 18 and 25.80% of those age 65 or over. The county's per-capita income makes it one of the poorest counties in the United States.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 4,153 people, 1,158 households, and 900 families in the county.[11] The population density was 3.8 inhabitants per square mile (1.5/km2). There were 1,311 housing units at an average density of 1.2 per square mile (0.46/km2).[12] The racial makeup of the county was 84.1% American Indian, 12.6% white, 0.2% black or African American, 0.1% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 2.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.0% of the population.[11] In terms of ancestry, 13.5% were German, and 0.3% were American.[13]

Of the 1,158 households, 54.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.5% were married couples living together, 31.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 22.3% were non-families, and 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 3.55 and the average family size was 3.89. The median age was 26.3 years.[11]

The median income for a household in the county was $30,990 and the median income for a family was $31,098. Males had a median income of $31,894 versus $26,619 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,542. About 39.0% of families and 47.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 58.4% of those under age 18 and 36.1% of those age 65 or over.[14]

Communities

Cities

Census-designated places

Township

Politics

With its population being mostly Native American, Sioux County is one of the most consistently Democratic counties in North Dakota, having last backed a Republican presidential candidate in 1980. Since then the closest a Republican has gotten to winning the county was Ronald Reagan in 1984 who lost the county by 19 percent. John Hoeven, in his 2010 election to the Senate, as well as his 2008 reelection as governor, won the county. In 2016, Hillary Clinton won the most votes in Sioux County, one of only two counties she won in the state. Green Party candidate Jill Stein received 10.4% of the popular vote.[15]

United States presidential election results for Sioux County, North Dakota[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 258 21.75% 804 67.79% 124 10.46%
2016 260 21.10% 758 61.53% 214 17.37%
2012 225 19.67% 900 78.67% 19 1.66%
2008 215 15.60% 1,145 83.09% 18 1.31%
2004 319 27.98% 804 70.53% 17 1.49%
2000 269 25.84% 724 69.55% 48 4.61%
1996 207 30.00% 393 56.96% 90 13.04%
1992 264 26.83% 463 47.05% 257 26.12%
1988 325 31.19% 701 67.27% 16 1.54%
1984 442 39.53% 655 58.59% 21 1.88%
1980 620 56.88% 383 35.14% 87 7.98%
1976 354 32.75% 697 64.48% 30 2.78%
1972 561 49.12% 557 48.77% 24 2.10%
1968 482 45.26% 525 49.30% 58 5.45%
1964 314 31.00% 695 68.61% 4 0.39%
1960 571 45.35% 688 54.65% 0 0.00%
1956 718 59.98% 476 39.77% 3 0.25%
1952 968 73.22% 336 25.42% 18 1.36%
1948 667 57.20% 465 39.88% 34 2.92%
1944 673 59.98% 445 39.66% 4 0.36%
1940 1,167 66.84% 578 33.10% 1 0.06%
1936 585 35.16% 877 52.70% 202 12.14%
1932 350 20.33% 1,328 77.12% 44 2.56%
1928 687 40.46% 988 58.19% 23 1.35%
1924 777 62.21% 58 4.64% 414 33.15%
1920 776 80.75% 163 16.96% 22 2.29%
1916 232 50.11% 200 43.20% 31 6.70%


Education

School districts include:[16]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Sioux County, North Dakota". www.census.gov. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 27, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Dakota Territory, South Dakota, and North Dakota: Individual County Chronologies". Dakota Territory Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2006. Archived from the original on April 2, 2018. Retrieved February 22, 2019.
  4. ^ a b Sioux County ND Google Maps (accessed February 22, 2019)
  5. ^ ""Find an Altitude/Sioux County ND" Google Maps (accessed February 22, 2019)". Archived from the original on May 21, 2019. Retrieved February 22, 2019.
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 29, 2015. Retrieved February 1, 2015.
  7. ^ "United States Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 1, 2015.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 1, 2015.
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (April 20, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 1, 2015.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 1, 2015.
  11. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  12. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  13. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  14. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  15. ^ a b Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  16. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Sioux County, ND" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2022. - Text list

Coordinates: 46°07′N 101°03′W / 46.11°N 101.05°W / 46.11; -101.05