Snyder County
Snyder County Courthouse
Snyder County Courthouse
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Snyder County
Location within the U.S. state of Pennsylvania
Map of the United States highlighting Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 40°46′N 77°05′W / 40.77°N 77.08°W / 40.77; -77.08
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
FoundedMarch 2, 1855
Named forSimon Snyder
SeatMiddleburg
Largest boroughSelinsgrove
Area
 • Total332 sq mi (860 km2)
 • Land329 sq mi (850 km2)
 • Water2.8 sq mi (7 km2)  0.8%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total39,736 Increase
 • Density123/sq mi (47/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Area code570 & 272, 717 & 223
Congressional district12th
Websitewww.snydercounty.org

Snyder County is a county in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. As of the 2020 census, the population was 39,736.[1] The county seat is Middleburg.[2] Snyder County was formed in 1855 from parts of Union County. The county is part of the Central Pennsylvania region of the state.[a]

Snyder County comprises the Selinsgrove, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Bloomsburg-Berwick-Sunbury, PA Combined Statistical Area.

History

Snyder County was settled in the 1740s by Pennsylvania Germans from Berks and Lancaster counties, and became an independent political unit on March 2, 1855, when formed under part of Union County. Snyder County took its name in honor of the famous citizen and political figure Simon Snyder, who was governor of Pennsylvania for three terms, from 1808 to 1817, and made his home in Selinsgrove. The county seat of Middleburg was laid out in 1800 and incorporated in 1864.[3]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 332 square miles (860 km2), of which 329 square miles (850 km2) is land and 2.8 square miles (7.3 km2) (0.8%) is water.[4] It is the fifth-smallest county in Pennsylvania by area. Snyder County is in the Ridge and Valley region of the Appalachian Mountains. Two parallel mountain ridges, Shade Mountain and Jacks Mountain, run southwest to northeast. Between the ridges are steep hills, gently rolling hills, and flat creek valleys. The Susquehanna River is the eastern border. Snyder County is one of the 423 counties served by the Appalachian Regional Commission,[5] and it is identified as part of the "Midlands" by Colin Woodard in his book American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America.[6]

With over 400 active farms in the county, agriculture plays an important role in the economy and environment. Roughly half the county remains forested with both softwoods and hardwoods. These woods provide a place for wildlife to roam which provides for the sport of hunting.

Climate

Snyder has a humid continental climate, which is hot-summer (Dfa) except in higher elevations, where it is warm-summer (Dfb). Average temperatures in Selinsgrove range from 27.4 °F in January to 72.8 °F in July, while in Beavertown they range from 26.6 °F in January to 72.1 °F in July.[7]

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
186015,035
187015,6063.8%
188017,79714.0%
189017,651−0.8%
190017,304−2.0%
191016,800−2.9%
192017,1292.0%
193018,83610.0%
194020,2087.3%
195022,91213.4%
196025,92213.1%
197029,26912.9%
198033,58414.7%
199036,6809.2%
200037,5462.4%
201039,7025.7%
202039,7360.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790–1960[9] 1900–1990[10]
1990–2000[11] 2010–2017[12] 2010-2020[13]

According to the 2010 federal census, there were 39,702 people, 14,414 households, and 9,981 families residing in the county. The population density was 113 people per square mile (44 people/km2). There were 14,890 housing units at an average density of 45 units per square mile (17/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97% White, 1.2% Black or African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.42% Asian, and 0.07% Pacific Islander. Two percent of the population were Hispanic or Latino. US Veterans – 2,681. Median household income (in 2014 dollars), 2010–2014 was reported as $48,718, while the per capita income was $23,886.[14] In 2014, the median household income in the USA was $53,700.[15]

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 37,546 people, 13,654 households, and 9,981 families residing in the county. The population density was 113 people per square mile (44 people/km2). There were 14,890 housing units at an average density of 45 units per square mile (17/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.93% White, 0.82% Black or African American, 0.05% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander. 0.98% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 48.2% were of German, 17.2% American and 5.5% English ancestry.

There were 13,654 households, out of which 32.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.00% were married couples living together, 7.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.90% were non-families. 22.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.00% under the age of 18, 11.20% from 18 to 24, 27.40% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, and 14.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 95.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.10 males.

2020 census

Snyder County Racial Composition[17]
Race Num. Perc.
White (NH) 36,992 93.1%
Black or African American (NH) 504 1.3%
Native American (NH) 32 0.08%
Asian (NH) 296 0.7%
Pacific Islander (NH) 11 0.03%
Other/Mixed (NH) 924 2.32%
Hispanic or Latino 977 2.45%

Micropolitan Statistical Area

Map of the Bloomsburg–Berwick–Sunbury, PA Combined Statistical Area (CSA), composed of the following parts:
  Sunbury, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area (μSA)

The United States Office of Management and Budget[18] has designated Snyder County as the Selinsgrove, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area (μSA). As of the 2010 census[19] the micropolitan area ranked 15th most populous in the State of Pennsylvania and the 313th most populous in the United States with a population of 39,702. Snyder County is also a part of the Bloomsburg–Berwick–Sunbury, PA Combined Statistical Area (CSA), which combines the populations of Snyder County, as well as Columbia, Montour, Northumberland and Union Counties in Pennsylvania. The Combined Statistical Area ranked 8th in the State of Pennsylvania and 115th most populous in the United States with a population of 264,739.

Politics

United States presidential election results for Snyder County, Pennsylvania[20]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 13,983 72.90% 4,910 25.60% 288 1.50%
2016 11,725 71.12% 4,002 24.28% 759 4.60%
2012 10,073 66.85% 4,687 31.11% 308 2.04%
2008 9,900 63.60% 5,382 34.58% 284 1.82%
2004 10,566 70.52% 4,348 29.02% 69 0.46%
2000 8,963 69.80% 3,536 27.54% 342 2.66%
1996 6,742 57.91% 3,405 29.25% 1,495 12.84%
1992 6,934 55.05% 2,952 23.44% 2,710 21.51%
1988 9,054 76.87% 2,658 22.57% 67 0.57%
1984 8,968 78.73% 2,383 20.92% 40 0.35%
1980 7,634 72.08% 2,418 22.83% 539 5.09%
1976 6,557 66.04% 3,097 31.19% 275 2.77%
1972 7,308 78.20% 1,834 19.63% 203 2.17%
1968 6,784 71.64% 1,993 21.05% 692 7.31%
1964 5,195 55.17% 4,199 44.59% 22 0.23%
1960 8,103 80.09% 1,998 19.75% 16 0.16%
1956 7,102 78.35% 1,959 21.61% 3 0.03%
1952 6,836 80.00% 1,686 19.73% 23 0.27%
1948 5,181 77.66% 1,490 22.34% 0 0.00%
1944 5,696 75.81% 1,795 23.89% 23 0.31%
1940 5,722 69.66% 2,478 30.17% 14 0.17%
1936 5,550 64.55% 2,999 34.88% 49 0.57%
1932 3,423 59.37% 2,176 37.74% 167 2.90%
1928 5,693 87.22% 805 12.33% 29 0.44%
1924 3,055 72.00% 970 22.86% 218 5.14%
1920 2,751 72.20% 964 25.30% 95 2.49%
1916 1,797 57.74% 1,247 40.07% 68 2.19%
1912 626 18.80% 991 29.76% 1,713 51.44%
1908 2,401 67.41% 1,081 30.35% 80 2.25%
1904 2,538 71.55% 972 27.40% 37 1.04%
1900 2,517 64.85% 1,319 33.99% 45 1.16%
1896 2,572 64.66% 1,351 33.96% 55 1.38%
1892 2,307 59.92% 1,511 39.25% 32 0.83%
1888 2,360 60.36% 1,493 38.18% 57 1.46%

The county is strongly Republican in presidential elections. The last Republican nominee to receive less than 60% of the county’s vote was Bob Dole. In 2008 John McCain received 64% of the county’s vote.[21] In the 1964 presidential election Snyder County was one of only four counties in Pennsylvania to vote for Barry Goldwater, and by 0.6 percentage points shaded Carroll County, New Hampshire as Goldwater’s strongest county in the Northeast.[22] The last Republican presidential candidate to lose Snyder County was incumbent president William Howard Taft when he split the Republican vote with challenger and former president Theodore Roosevelt, who took the county for the insurgent Progressive Party.[23] In fact, no Democratic presidential candidate has been able to claim the county since Pennsylvania native James Buchanan won the presidency in 1856. The only county in Pennsylvania to be more steadfastly Republican (or indeed, remain so one-sidedly partisan for either party in Pennsylvania) in presidential contests has been Snyder County's neighbor to the north, Union County, which voted for John C. Fremont over Buchanan in 1856.[24]

The county is located in Pennsylvania's 12th congressional district, which has a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+17 and is represented by Republican Fred Keller. As part of Pennsylvania Senate, District 27 it is represented by Republican John Gordner. The county contains locations in Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 82, Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 85, and Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 108. All of these have been represented by Republicans since 1989.

Of "Straight Party" voters in Snyder 73.2% are Republican and 24.65% are Democratic. In the 2008 election Republicans won in all races and in most they won by over 20%. Chris Carney lost by roughly 13% in the county[25] while winning by 12% in the district.

State Representatives

Serve two-year terms in Pennsylvania House of Representatives

State Senator

US Representatives

U.S. Senators

Snyder County is further represented by two U.S. Senators, which as of 2023, are both members of the Democratic Party:

Boards and agencies

Utilities

Electric – All 21 municipalities within Snyder County receive electric service from PPL Electric Utilities, Inc. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, a 500 kilovolt line runs through Snyder County. Three 138 kilovolt lines stem from this 500 kilovolt line at the Sunbury Generation coal-fired power plant in Shamokin Dam, which is capable of producing roughly 400 megawatts of electrical power.

Water – Water service in Snyder County is provided by various municipal and regional authorities, private water providers, and private well water sources.

Gas – UGI Penn Natural Gas is the only natural gas provider in Snyder County, providing service to Jackson, Middlecreek, Monroe, and Penn Townships, as well as Selinsgrove and Shamokin Dam Boroughs. Several propane dealers exist to service the rural community.

Communications – Verizon provides telephone service and EvenLink provides VoIP telephone service to all 21 municipalities in Snyder County.

Cable television service is provided by Service Electric Cablevision, Nittany Media, Inc., and Beaver Springs Community TV Association.

High-speed Internet access is principally provided by Verizon, EvenLink, and Service Electric Cablevision.

Economy

Manufacturing since the year 2001 was faced with the largest loss in employment in Snyder County. The sector dealt with a loss of 427 jobs, or 7.2 percent of the employment in the industry. This made up a total of 36 percent of all county employment losses since 2001. Employment Report for Snyder County, Pennsylvania. U.S. Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Education

Colleges and universities

Map of Snyder County, Pennsylvania Public School Districts

Public school districts

Private schools

As reported by the National Center for Educational Statistics[28]

Transportation

Snyder County has two main arteries. U.S. Routes 11/15 travel through the county on the east end generally following the path of the Susquehanna River. The proposed Central Susquehanna Valley Thruway travels through the county. U.S. Route 522 begins in Selinsgrove and travels west through Kreamer, Middleburg and on to Lewistown. Route 35 begins on U.S. 11/15 south of Selinsgrove and runs roughly parallel to Route 522, crossing through Freeburg and Mount Pleasant Mills then westward to McAllisterville and Richfield in western Snyder County. State routes 235, 104 and 204 cross the county in a north–south direction.

Communities

Map of Snyder County with municipal labels showing boroughs (red), townships (white), and census-designated places (blue)

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and, in at most two cases, towns. The following boroughs and townships are located in Snyder County:

Boroughs

Townships

Census-designated places

Census-designated places are geographical areas designated by the U.S. Census Bureau for the purposes of compiling demographic data. They are not actual jurisdictions under Pennsylvania law. Other unincorporated communities, such as villages, may be listed here as well.

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Snyder County.[19]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census)
1 Selinsgrove Borough 5,654
2 Shamokin Dam Borough 1,686
3 Hummels Wharf CDP 1,353
4 Middleburg Borough 1,309
5 Beavertown Borough 965
6 McClure Borough 941
7 Kreamer CDP 822
8 Port Trevorton CDP 769
9 Penns Creek CDP 715
10 Beaver Springs CDP 674
11 Freeburg Borough 575
12 Richfield (partially in Juniata County) CDP 549
13 Mount Pleasant Mills CDP 464
14 Kratzerville CDP 383
15 Paxtonville CDP 265
16 Troxelville CDP 221

Culture

Snyder County is well known for its unmistakable Pennsylvania German language and culture, agricultural heritage, as well as its fraktur, Kentucky rifles, wood products industries, Middleswarth chip factory, and the annual fairs, festivals, and auctions that keep the local heritage alive. Some of the more famous historical structures of the county are the Governor Snyder Mansion, Pomfret's Castle, Schoch Block House, ruins of the Pennsylvania Canal, and its covered bridges. Snyder County is home to Snyder-Middleswarth State Park, the Tall Timbers Natural Area, and thirteen Pennsylvania state historical markers.

Historical markers

See also

References

  1. ^ Includes Centre, Lycoming, Northumberland, Columbia, Mifflin, Union, Snyder, Clinton, Juniata and Montour Counties
  1. ^ "Census - Geography Profile: Snyder County, Pennsylvania". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 18, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Historical Society." Snyder County - Default. Web. October 27, 2011. http://www.snydercounty.org/Depts/Historical_Society/Pages/HistoricalSociety.aspx Archived October 5, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 10, 2015.
  5. ^ "About the Appalachian Region". Appalachian Regional Commission. Retrieved June 23, 2024.
  6. ^ Woodard, Colin. "The Maps That Show That City vs. Country Is Not Our Political Fault Line". New York Times. Retrieved July 30, 2018.
  7. ^ "PRISM Climate Group at Oregon State University".
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 10, 2015.
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 10, 2015.
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 24, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 10, 2015.
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved March 10, 2015.
  12. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  13. ^ "Census 2020".
  14. ^ US Census Bureau (2016). "Snyder County, Pennsylvania Quick Facts 2010".
  15. ^ Jeff Guo (September 15, 2015). "Lower wages for whites, higher wages for immigrants, and inequality for all". Washington Post. Archived from the original on September 30, 2015. Retrieved September 12, 2017.
  16. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 24, 2014.
  17. ^ "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE – 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) – Snyder County, Pennsylvania".
  18. ^ "Office of Management and Budget". Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  19. ^ a b CNMP, US Census Bureau. "This site has been redesigned and relocated. - U.S. Census Bureau". www.census.gov. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  20. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  21. ^ "President Map - Election Results 2008 - The New York Times". elections.nytimes.com. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  22. ^ "David Leip's Presidential Election Atlas". Archived from the original on June 7, 2006. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  23. ^ "Presidential election of 1912 - Map by counties". geoelections.free.fr. Archived from the original on June 13, 2018. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  24. ^ "Presidential Elections". staffweb.wilkes.edu. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  25. ^ Snyder County election site[permanent dead link]
  26. ^ a b Center, Legislativate Data Processing. "Find Your Legislator". The official website for the Pennsylvania General Assembly. Retrieved May 11, 2017.
  27. ^ Pennsylvania General Assembly (2016). "Snyder County PA Legislators".
  28. ^ ies, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, Private School Universe Survey 2008
  29. ^ Ali Stevenes (August 21, 2013). "Ribbon cut on a new school in Selinsgrove". WKOK.com 1070AM. Archived from the original on November 7, 2014. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  30. ^ "Kissimmee PA". Place Beam.[permanent dead link]
  31. ^ "Historical Society". www.snydercounty.org. Archived from the original on October 5, 2011. Retrieved June 13, 2018.

40°46′N 77°05′W / 40.77°N 77.08°W / 40.77; -77.08