South Carolina Gamecocks
2022 South Carolina Gamecocks baseball team
USC baseball logo.svg
Founded1892
Overall record2,668–1,608–17 (.623)
UniversityUniversity of South Carolina
Athletic directorRay Tanner
Head coachMark Kingston (5th season)
ConferenceSEC
Eastern Division
LocationColumbia, South Carolina
Home stadiumFounders Park
(Capacity: 8,242)
NicknameGamecocks
ColorsGarnet and black[1]
   
NCAA Tournament champions
2010, 2011
College World Series runner-up
1975, 1977, 2002, 2012
College World Series appearances
1975, 1977, 1981, 1982, 1985, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2010, 2011, 2012
NCAA regional champions
1975, 1977, 1981, 1982, 1985, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2016, 2018
NCAA Tournament appearances
1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1992, 1993, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016, 2018, 2021
Conference tournament champions
2004
Regular season conference champions
2000, 2002, 2011
Conference division champions
1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2011, 2012, 2016

The South Carolina Gamecocks baseball team represents the University of South Carolina in NCAA Division I college baseball. South Carolina has perennially been one of the best teams in college baseball since 1970, posting 33 NCAA Tournament appearances, 11 College World Series berths, 6 CWS Finals appearances and 2 National Championships: 2010 and 2011. Carolina is one of six schools in NCAA history to win back-to-back titles. Since joining the Southeastern Conference in 1992, the team has competed in the Eastern division. South Carolina owns a stellar 32-20 record at the CWS, holds the NCAA record for consecutive wins (22) in the national tournament and the longest win streak ever at the CWS (12 in a row from 2010 to 2012) in which the Gamecocks played for national titles all three years.

The current head coach is Mark Kingston, with Chad Holbrook resigning on June 6, 2017. Holbrook took over for Ray Tanner, who was named athletics director at USC after the 2012 season. This follows a string of three consecutive appearances in the national championship series, including two consecutive national championships. During Tanner's stint as head coach, the Gamecocks also captured three SEC titles, one SEC tournament title, six division titles, six College World Series appearances, and 13 of their 15 straight NCAA Tournaments (longest streak in the SEC at the time). Between 2010 and 2012 the Gamecocks set two NCAA records for postseason success: the most consecutive NCAA tournament wins (22) and the most consecutive wins in the College World Series (12). In 2013, Carolina set the record for consecutive home NCAA tournament wins, with 29. The team plays its home games at Founders Park, which opened on February 21, 2009.[2]

Program history

South Carolina played its first intercollegiate game on May 2, 1895 against Wofford in Spartanburg after the faculty agreed to let the athletic teams travel outside of Columbia.[3] After decades of lackluster performance on the diamond, Carolina's fortunes quickly changed with the hiring of former New York Yankees second baseman Bobby Richardson in 1970. Since then, the Gamecocks have been regular NCAA Tournament participants, making 31 Regional and 11 College World Series appearances.

Carolina owns a 32–20 all-time record at the College World Series and is 137–71 in NCAA Tournament play. Carolina holds the NCAA Tournament records for consecutive NCAA tournament wins (22), consecutive CWS wins (12), and consecutive home NCAA tournament wins (30). In 124 years of baseball, through 2016, Carolina has 2,533 wins, 1,508 losses, and 17 ties.

Bobby Richardson era (1970–1976)

Richardson led the Gamecocks to their first NCAA Tournament appearance in 1974, which set the stage for what would happen a year later. In 1975, South Carolina posted a 51–6–1 record, made the College World Series and played for the National Title against Texas (5–1 Longhorns victory). Richardson left South Carolina after the 1976 season, finishing his tenure with a 221–92–1 record and three NCAA Tournament appearances.

June Raines era (1977–1996)

June Raines took over the Gamecocks in 1977 and picked up where Richardson left off, leading the Gamecocks to a 43–12–1 record and its second National Title game appearance in three years (2–1 loss to Arizona State). Raines led the Gamecocks to three more College World Series appearances by his final season in 1996, and he finished his tenure as the program's all-time winningest coach with a 763–380–2 overall record. During the Raines' era, South Carolina made 11 NCAA Tournament appearances and posted nine 40-win seasons. The 1980s saw the program's most successful run during Raines' tenure, as the Gamecocks made eight NCAA Tournaments, including seven straight from 1980–1986.

Ray Tanner era (1997–2012)

In 1997, Ray Tanner was hired and quickly built upon the winning tradition that Richardson created and Raines had perpetuated. In 16 seasons as the Gamecocks' skipper, Tanner compiled a 734–313 (.701) record with six College World Series appearances including finishing as National runner-up in 2002 and 2012 while winning the 2010 and 2011 NCAA National Championships. Under Tanner, the Gamecocks have made 14 NCAA Tournament appearances, advanced to the Super Regionals 10 times, and have posted fourteen 40-win and five 50-win seasons. In addition, the Gamecocks won the 2000, 2002 and 2011 SEC regular season championships, the 2004 SEC Tournament Championship, and six SEC East titles (1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2011, 2012). In 2010, Tanner and the Gamecocks won the NCAA Championship at the old Johnny "The Blatt" Rosenblatt Stadium in Omaha, becoming the first team to win six straight games in a College World Series and the third team to win the CWS after losing its first game of the series. In 2011, Coach Tanner led the Gamecocks to a share of the 2011 Regular Season SEC Championship before winning the 2011 NCAA National Championship at the new TD Ameritrade Park in Omaha. Under Coach Tanner's guidance, South Carolina set the NCAA record for consecutive NCAA Tournament wins (22) and CWS wins (12) between 2010–2012, as the Gamecocks became just the sixth program to win back-to-back CWS titles. On July 13, 2012, Coach Tanner accepted the position of athletics director at USC, bringing his tenure as baseball head coach to a close.

Chad Holbrook era (2013–2017)

Chad Holbrook became head coach at the start of the 2013 season and began his career on February 15, 2013. South Carolina defeated Liberty 4–3 on a day honoring Tanner. Carolina reached the NCAA tournament in 2013, 2014, & 2016, advancing to the Super Regionals during the 2013 and 2016 season. Holbrook resigned on June 6, 2017.[4]

Mark Kingston era (2018–present)

Mark Kingston became head coach at the start of the 2018 season and began his career on February 16, 2018.[citation needed] In his first season, he led the Gamecocks to a Regional in which they won, going 3-0 in the Greenville (ECU) Regional.

2000's: SEC dominance and return to Omaha

In the 10 years from 2000–2009, South Carolina posted an impressive 468–201 overall record (179–120 SEC). The 468 overall wins ranked fourth in Division I College Baseball (first among SEC programs), and the 179 SEC victories led the conference for the decade. The Gamecocks made the NCAA Tournament every season, advancing to seven Super Regionals and three College World Series (first CWS berths since 1985). In addition, South Carolina won 40 or more games each season and hit the 50-win mark on three occasions (2000, 2002, 2004). The highlight of the decade was an appearance in the 2002 National Championship game against Texas, who defeated the Gamecocks by a score of 12–6. The 2002 squad finished with a 57–18 mark, setting the record for most season victories in program history.

South Carolina won eight SEC series to finish 21–9 in regular season conference play (2nd place), but posted an 0–2 mark in the SEC Tournament. Once the NCAA Tournament began, however, the Gamecocks rode strong pitching and clutch hitting to win their Regional and Super Regional and earn a berth in the College World Series. After an opening game loss to Oklahoma, South Carolina reeled off four straight victories to reach the championship series against UCLA. The Gamecocks continued their hot streak, defeating the Bruins in consecutive games (7–1[5] and 2–1) to win the 2010 National Championship.[6] South Carolina finished the season with a 54–16 overall record, which included an 11–1 mark in NCAA postseason play. South Carolina was the final team to win the CWS Championship in Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium, and Gamecock center fielder Jackie Bradley Jr. was named CWS Most Outstanding Player.[7]

2010 National Championship

South Carolina won eight SEC series to finish 21–9 in regular season conference play (2nd place), but posted an 0–2 mark in the SEC Tournament. Once the NCAA Tournament began, however, the Gamecocks rode strong pitching and clutch hitting to win their Regional and Super Regional and earn a berth in the College World Series. After an opening game loss to Oklahoma, South Carolina reeled off four straight victories to reach the championship series against UCLA. Just as in 2002, the Gamecocks had to defeat arch rival Clemson twice (5-1 & 4-3) to reach the tournament finals against heavily favored UCLA. The Gamecocks continued their hot streak, defeating the Bruins in consecutive games (7–1[8] and 2–1) to win the 2010 National Championship.[9] South Carolina finished the season with a 54–16 overall record, which included an 11–1 mark in NCAA postseason play. South Carolina was the final team to win the CWS Championship in Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium, and Gamecock center fielder Jackie Bradley Jr. was named CWS Most Outstanding Player. This marked the University's first major athletic national championship.[10]

2011 National Championship

South Carolina finished the 2011 regular season 44–12 (22–8 SEC) and shared the SEC regular season championship with divisional rivals Florida and Vanderbilt, but posted a 1–2 mark in the SEC Tournament in Hoover, Alabama despite their #1 overall seeding. Once the NCAA Tournament began, however, the Gamecocks rode strong pitching, clutch hitting and incredible defense while cruising through their Regional and Super Regional, without a loss, on their way to a second consecutive berth in the College World Series. South Carolina proceeded to defeat Texas A&M 5–4 in their first game, then swept #1 national seed Virginia (7–1 and 3–2) in the next two, including a 13-inning win in the second matchup, to battle their way back to the CWS Championship Series versus SEC Eastern Division foe Florida.[11] This marked the second time two teams from the SEC had participated in the Championship Series/Games. In Game 1 of the Championship Series, South Carolina lived up to their mantra as they battled to win their second straight extra inning game in the CWS, 2–1 over the Gators, in 11 innings.[12] They had a much easier time with the favored Gators in Game 2, winning 5–2 to earn the 2011 CWS Championship and their second consecutive national title.[13] The Gamecock defense turned an incredible nine double-plays in this CWS – no other participant turned more than three. South Carolina finished the season with a 55–14 overall record, setting a new NCAA record for consecutive post-season wins with 16, a new record for consecutive College World Series wins with 11, and became the just the sixth program in history to win back-to-back NCAA Division I Baseball Championships. Carolina became the first team to win the College World Series in the new TD Ameritrade Park, and Gamecock second baseman Scott Wingo was named CWS Most Outstanding Player.[14]

National runner-up seasons

50-Win seasons

Head coaches and all-time results

Head Coaches
Name Years Seasons Won Lost Tie Pct.
No coach 1892–1893 2 5 0 0 1.000
No team 1894
No coach 1895 1 0 1 0 0.000
(Mgr.) E.R. Wilson 1896 1 3 4 0 .429
(Mgr.) Lede Hagood 1897 1 4 3 0 .571
(Mgr.) W.C. Benet Jr. 1898 1 1 4 0 .200
(Mgr.) J.C. Hughes 1899 1 1 8 0 .111
(Mgr.) A.H. Brooker 1900 1 7 4 0 .636
(Mgr.) J.D. Ardrey 1901 1 6 3 0 .667
(Mgr.) G.B. Timmerman 1902 1 6 4 0 .600
W. Augustus Lee 1903–1904 2 11 6 1 .631
William Earle 1905 1 5 7 1 .423
George Needham 1906 1 1 7 0 .125
Dicky James 1907 1 11 6 0 .647
Frank Lohr 1908 1 10 3 1 .750
Dick Reid 1909 1 11 6 0 .647
Bill Breitenstein 1910 1 11 5 0 .688
P.L. Wright 1911 1 11 6 0 .647
James G. Driver 1912–1913 2 22 19 1 .536
G.I. Guerrant 1914 1 12 7 1 .625
Syd Smith 1915 1 6 11 0 .353
Bill Clark 1916
1921–1924
5 38 49 2 .438
Dixon Foster 1917–1920 4 27 51 2 .350
Branch Bocock 1925–1927 3 17 21 0 .447
Billy Laval 1928–1934 7 89 33 1 .728
Dutch Stamman 1935–1937 3 18 25 1 .420
Catfish Smith 1938–1939
1946–1947
4 40 48 0 .455
Ted Petoskey 1940–1942
1948–1956
12 113 120 1 .485
Kay Kirven 1943 1 5 6 0 .455
H.W. Klocker 1944 1 4 4 0 .500
Johnny McMillan 1945 1 8 4 0 .667
Joe Grugan 1957–1963 7 51 93 0 .354
Bob Reising 1964–1965 2 31 24 0 .564
Dick Weldon 1966 1 15 8 0 .652
Jack Powers 1967–1969 3 47 40 1 .540
Bobby Richardson 1970–1976 7 220 91 2 .706
June Raines 1977–1996 20 763 380 2 .667
Ray Tanner 1997–2012 16 738 316 0 .700
Chad Holbrook 2013–2017 5 199 105 0 .655
Mark Kingston 2018–present 4 111 81 0 .578
All-Time 128 2668 1609 17 .623
Year-by-Year
Season Coach Record Notes
Overall Conference NCAA CWS
Independent
1892 No coach 1–0
1893 No coach 4–0
1894 No coach No team
1895 No coach 0–1
1896 No coach 3–4
1897 No coach 4–3
1898 No coach 1–4
1899 No coach 1–8
1900 No coach 7–4
1901 No coach 6–3
1902 No coach 6–4
1903 W. Augustus Lee 8–3–1
1904 W. Augustus Lee 3–3
1905 William Earle 5–7–1
1906 George Needham 1–7
1907 Dicky James 11–6
1908 Frank Lohr 10–3–1
1909 Dick Reid 11–6
1910 Bill Breitenstein 11–5
1911 P.L. Wright 11–6
1912 James G. Driver 11–11
1913 James G. Driver 11–8–1
1914 G.I. Guerrant 12–7–1
1915 Syd Smith 6–11
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association
1916 Bill Clark 9–14
1917 Dixon Foster 4–7–2
1918 Dixon Foster 11–13
1919 Dixon Foster 9–13
1920 Dixon Foster 3–18
1921 Bill Clark 3–12–1
1922 Bill Clark 8–7–1
Southern Conference
1923 Bill Clark 8–8
1924 Bill Clark 10–8
1925 Branch Bocock 4–9
1926 Branch Bocock 6–4
1927 Branch Bocock 7–8
1928 Billy Laval 7–8–1
1929 Billy Laval 8–4
1930 Billy Laval 14–5
1931 Billy Laval 15–3
1932 Billy Laval 16–7
1933 Billy Laval 17–3
1934 Billy Laval 12–3
1935 Dutch Stamman 8–10
1936 Dutch Stamman 5–9–1
1937 Dutch Stamman 5–6
1938 Catfish Smith 12–7
1939 Catfish Smith 10–11
1940 Ted Petoskey 8–9
1941 Ted Petoskey 10–8
1942 Ted Petoskey 6–11
1943 Kay Kirven 5–6
1944 H.W. Klocker 4–4
1945 Johnny McMillan 8–4
1946 Catfish Smith 10–13
1947 Catfish Smith 8–17
1948 Ted Petoskey 6–14
1949 Ted Petoskey 15–6
1950 Ted Petoskey 16–9–1
1951 Ted Petoskey 6–15
1952 Ted Petoskey 9–8
1953 Ted Petoskey 8–11
Atlantic Coast Conference
1954 Ted Petoskey 10–10 4–8
1955 Ted Petoskey 10–10 7–7
1956 Ted Petoskey 9–9 5–9
1957 Joe Grugan 9–9 6–8
1958 Joe Grugan 7–14 3–11
1959 Joe Grugan 12–12 5–8
1960 Joe Grugan 4–18 3–11
1961 Joe Grugan 3–15 1–12
1962 Joe Grugan 9–11 6–7
1963 Joe Grugan 7–14 3–11
1964 Bob Reising 15–12 6–7
1965 Bob Reising 16–12 7–7
1966 Dick Weldon 15–8 7–7
1967 Jack Powers 21–8 8–5
1968 Jack Powers 14–11 7–9
1969 Jack Powers 12–21–1 3–15
1970 Bobby Richardson 14–20 9–12
1971 Bobby Richardson 18–12 7–7
Independent
1972 Bobby Richardson 25–16
1973 Bobby Richardson 26–15–1
1974 Bobby Richardson 48–8 4–2 NCAA Appearance
1975 Bobby Richardson 51–6–1 7–2 4–2 NCAA Atlantic Regional Champs, College World Series Runners–up
1976 Bobby Richardson 38–14 1–2 NCAA Atlantic Regional
1977 June Raines 43–12–1 7–3 3–2 College World Series Runners–up
1978 June Raines 31–14
1979 June Raines 31–16
1980 June Raines 39–11 2–2 NCAA Appearance
1981 June Raines 46–15 5–2 2–2 College World Series Appearance
1982 June Raines 45–13 4–2 0–2 College World Series Appearance
Metro Conference
1983 June Raines 35–13 0–2 NCAA Appearance
1984 June Raines 41–18 2–2 NCAA Appearance
1985 June Raines 47–22 4–2 0–2 College World Series Appearance
1986 June Raines 43–23 1–2 NCAA Appearance
1987 June Raines 39–14
1988 June Raines 43–21 3–2 NCAA Appearance
1989 June Raines 34–23
1990 June Raines 33–25
1991 June Raines 40–22
Southeastern Conference (East Division)
1992 June Raines 42–22 13–11 2–2 NCAA Appearance
1993 June Raines 39–20–1 15–10–1 1–2 NCAA Appearance
1994 June Raines 35–23 11–15
1995 June Raines 32–25 12–14
1996 June Raines 25–28 13–17
1997 Ray Tanner 33–24 13–17
1998 Ray Tanner 44–18 19–10 2–2 NCAA Atlantic I Regional
1999 Ray Tanner 35–23 15–15 SEC East Champions
2000 Ray Tanner 56–10 25–5 4–2 SEC East Champions, SEC Champions, NCAA Columbia Regional Champs, NCAA Columbia Super Regional
2001 Ray Tanner 49–20 17–13 5–3 NCAA Columbia Regional Champs, NCAA Palo Alto Super Regional
2002 Ray Tanner 57–18 21–8 9–4 4–2 SEC East Champions, SEC Champions, NCAA Columbia Regional & Super Regional Champs, College World Series Runners–up
2003 Ray Tanner 45–22 19–11 6–2 1–2 SEC East Champions, NCAA Atlanta Regional & Columbia Super Regional Champs, College World Series Appearance
2004 Ray Tanner 53–17 17–13 8–2 3–2 SEC Tournament Champions, NCAA Columbia Regional & Super Regional Champs, College World Series Appearance
2005 Ray Tanner 41–23 16–14 3–2 NCAA Atlanta Regional
2006 Ray Tanner 41–25 15–15 4–3 NCAA Charlottesville Regional Champs, NCAA Athens Super Regional
2007 Ray Tanner 46–20 17–13 4–2 NCAA Columbia Regional Champs, NCAA Chapel Hill Super Regional
2008 Ray Tanner 40–23 15–15 2–2 NCAA Raleigh Regional
2009 Ray Tanner 40–23 17–13 2–2 NCAA Greenville Regional
2010 Ray Tanner 54–16 21–9 11–1 6–1 NCAA Columbia Regional & Myrtle Beach Super Regional Champs, College World Series Champions
2011 Ray Tanner 55–14 22–8 10–0 5–0 SEC East Champions, SEC Champions, NCAA Columbia Regional and Super Regional Champions, College World Series Champions
2012 Ray Tanner 49–20 18–11 9–3 4–3 SEC East Champions, NCAA Columbia Regional and Super Regional Champions, College World Series Runners–up
2013 Chad Holbrook 43–20 17–12 4–2 NCAA Columbia Regional Champs, NCAA Chapel Hill Super Regional
2014 Chad Holbrook 44–18 18–12 2–2 NCAA Columbia Regional
2015 Chad Holbrook 32–25 13–17
2016 Chad Holbrook 46–18 20–9 4–3 SEC East Champions, NCAA Columbia Regional Champions, NCAA Columbia Super Regional
2017 Chad Holbrook 35–25 13–17
2018 Mark Kingston 37–26 17–13 4–2 NCAA Greenville Regional Champions, NCAA Fayetteville Super Regional
2019 Mark Kingston 28–28 8–22
2020 Mark Kingston 12–4 0–0 Rest of season canceled due to Covid-19
2021 Mark Kingston 34–23 16–14 1–2 NCAA Columbia Regional
All-Time 2668–1608–17 137–71 32–20 33 NCAA Tournaments, 18 Regional Championships, 11 CWS appearances, 4 National Runner-up finishes, 2 National Championships

Program achievements

National Champions 2010, 2011
National Runners-up 1975, 1977, 2002, 2012
CWS Appearances 1975, 1977, 1981, 1982, 1985, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2010, 2011, 2012
NCAA Super Regionals* 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2016, 2018
SEC Champions 2000, 2002, 2011
SEC East Champions 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2011, 2012, 2016
SEC Tournament Champions 2004

Awards

South Carolina's 1st Team All-Americans

Player Position Year(s) Selectors
Hank Small First Base 1975 ABCA
Earl Bass Pitcher 1974, 1975 ABCA
Randy Martz Pitcher 1977 ABCA
John Marquardt Third Base 1978 ABCA
Joe Kucharski Pitcher 1982 ABCA
Mike Cook Pitcher 1985 ABCA, BA
Joe Biernat INF 1993 NCBWA
Ryan Bordenick Designated Hitter/Catcher 1997, 1998 ABCA, NCBWA
Adam Everett Shortstop 1998 BA
Mike Curry Outfielder 1998 BA
Kip Bouknight Pitcher 2000 ABCA, BA, CB
Lee Gronkiewicz Pitcher 2001 ABCA, CB, NCBWA
Yaron Peters First Base 2002 ABCA, BA
Blake Taylor Pitcher 2002 BA
David Marchbanks Pitcher 2003 NCBWA, BA, CB
Landon Powell Catcher 2003, 2004 NCBWA
Chad Blackwell Pitcher 2004 College Baseball Insider
Justin Smoak First Base 2008 ABCA, BA, NCBWA, CB
Michael Roth Pitcher 2011 BA
Kyle Martin First Base 2015 BA
Source:"SEC All-Americas". secsports.com. Archived from the original on May 28, 2008. Retrieved July 24, 2008.

ABCA: American Baseball Coaches Association BA: Baseball America CB: Collegiate Baseball NCBWA: National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association Denotes consensus All-American

Notable players

Gamecocks in Major League Baseball

As of 2021, 59 former Gamecocks have seen action in the Major Leagues. Six players were active for more than 10 seasons: Brian Roberts (14), Steve Pearce (13), Dave Hollins (12), Mookie Wilson (12), Adam Everett (11), Justin Smoak (11).[15]

In the 2018 World Series, former Gamecock Steve Pearce won the 2018 World Series Most Valuable Player Award as he led the Boston Red Sox to their 9th World Series title in Franchise history. Jackie Bradley Jr. won the 2018 ALCS MVP.

During the 2021 season, there have been eleven active players on MLB rosters:

Gamecocks who are World Series champions

Gamecock Olympians

Gamecocks in Team USA

See also

References

  1. ^ "Colors – Communications and Public Affairs | University of South Carolina". Retrieved July 16, 2019.
  2. ^ "Opening Day Ceremonies To Be Held At Carolina Stadium University of South Carolina Official Athletic Site". cstv.com.
  3. ^ Hollis, Daniel Walker (1956), University of South Carolina, vol. II, University of South Carolina Press, p. 193
  4. ^ Robinson, Manie (June 6, 2017). "South Carolina baseball coach Chad Holbrook resigns". USA Today. Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  5. ^ "USC Defeats UCLA 7–1 in Game 1 of College World Series Final; One Win Away from National Championship". wltx.com.
  6. ^ Gardiner, Andy (June 30, 2010). "South Carolina's baseball title a matter of mound play". USA Today.
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 11, 2010.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "USC Defeats UCLA 7–1 in Game 1 of College World Series Final; One Win Away from National Championship". wltx.com.
  9. ^ Gardiner, Andy (June 30, 2010). "South Carolina's baseball title a matter of mound play". USA Today.
  10. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 11, 2010.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  11. ^ "College World Series: Day 7". ESPN.com.
  12. ^ "ESPN". ESPN.com.
  13. ^ "ESPN". ESPN.com.
  14. ^ "College World Series: Day 9". ESPN.com.
  15. ^ "University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC) Baseball Players". Baseball-Reference.com. March 5, 2021.