St. James Theatre
Erlanger's Theatre
(2019)
Address246 West 44th Street
Manhattan, New York
United States
Coordinates40°45′29″N 73°59′17″W / 40.75806°N 73.98806°W / 40.75806; -73.98806Coordinates: 40°45′29″N 73°59′17″W / 40.75806°N 73.98806°W / 40.75806; -73.98806
OwnerJujamcyn Theaters
TypeBroadway
Capacity1,710
Construction
Opened1927
ArchitectWarren and Wetmore
Website
www.jujamcyn.com/theatres/st-james/
DesignatedDecember 15, 1987[1]
Reference no.1374[1]
Designated entityFacade
DesignatedDecember 15, 1987[2]
Reference no.1375[2]
Designated entityAuditorium interior

The St. James Theatre, originally Erlanger's Theatre, is a Broadway theater at 246 West 44th Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1927, it was designed by Warren and Wetmore in a neo-Georgian style and was constructed for A. L. Erlanger. It has 1,709 seats across three levels and is operated by Jujamcyn Theaters. Both the facade and the auditorium interior are New York City landmarks.

The facade is made largely of stucco, except for the ground story, which is clad in cast stone above a granite water table. The ground story has several recessed openings to the lobby, auditorium, and upper-story offices. Above that are two marquees and a double-story cast-iron loggia, masking the fire escapes from the auditorium. The top story contains windows from the offices there. The auditorium is decorated largely with murals and ornamental plasterwork. The theater has a sloped orchestra level, two balcony levels, and a flat ceiling with a carved sounding board. The first balcony level contains box seats near the front of the auditorium, above which are murals. In addition, there are several lounges and passageways throughout the theater.

Erlanger had proposed a theater on the site as early as 1921, but two proposals failed to materialize. Erlanger's Theatre opened on September 26, 1927, with the musical The Merry Malones. Erlanger died in 1930, and the theater then passed to Lodewick Vroom in 1932; Vroom renamed it after St James's Theatre in London. The Shubert family acquired the St. James in 1941 but were forced to sell it in 1956 following an antitrust suit. William L. McKnight bought the theater and renovated it in 1958, with Jujamcyn taking over the venue's operation. The theater was further renovated in 1985, 1999, and 2016. The theater has housed several long-running musicals in its history, including original productions of Oklahoma!, The King and I, Hello, Dolly!, The Who's Tommy, and The Producers.

Site

The St. James Theatre is on 246 West 44th Street, on the south sidewalk between Eighth Avenue and Seventh Avenue, near Times Square in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City.[3][4] The land lot is nearly rectangular, with a protrusion on the eastern end. The lot covers 12,858 square feet (1,194.5 m2), with a frontage of 124.5 feet (37.9 m) on 44th Street and a depth of 100.42 feet (31 m).[4]

The St. James Theatre shares the city block with the Hayes Theater, Sardi's restaurant, and 1501 Broadway to the east, as well as 255 West 43rd Street and 229 West 43rd Street to the south. Across 44th Street are the Row NYC Hotel to the northwest, the Majestic and Broadhurst theaters to the north, and the Shubert Theatre and One Astor Plaza to the northeast. Other nearby structures include the John Golden, Bernard B. Jacobs, Gerald Schoenfeld, and Booth theaters to the north, as well as the former Hotel Carter, American Airlines Theatre, and Lyric Theatre to the south.[4]

The St. James was developed on the site of several old three-story row houses.[5] There were six residences, each with a brownstone front.[6] The original Sardi's restaurant was one of the buildings that was razed to make way for the St. James.[7]

Design

The St. James Theatre was designed by Warren and Wetmore in the Georgian Revival style,[8][9] with Beaux-Arts inspirations.[10] It was built for producer Abraham L. Erlanger and opened in 1927 as Erlanger's Theatre.[3][5] The theater was erected by the Thompson–Starrett Co.[11] The St. James is operated by Jujamcyn Theaters.[12][13]

Facade

Box-office entrance
Detail of loggia
Detail of attic

The facade is symmetrically arranged and is shorter than its width.[10] In general, the facade is plain in design.[14] The facade is made largely of stucco.[14][15] The ground story is clad in cast stone above a granite water table. Part of the eastern wall is also visible from the street and is clad in stucco over brick.[16] The St. James has a relatively simple facade, in contrast to nearby theaters like the Hayes or Shubert, but similar to the Majestic and Broadhurst.[5] This led The New York Times to call it "probably the least ornate of all the theatres recently added to the Times Square district".[17][18]

The ground story has numerous recessed doorways.[10] The doorway at the far west (on the right, as viewed from the front) is a metal stage door.[10][12] The entrance to the box office lobby is immediately adjacent to the stage door.[12][16] The lobby entrance consists of three aluminum and glass double doors, above which is a transom panel with signs.[16] East of the lobby entrance is a sign board, as well as a service door accessed by two granite steps. The center of the ground-story facade has four metal doors from the auditorium. The eastern section has a glass-and-metal double door to Jujamcyn's upper-story offices, as well as additional service doors. A pair of marquees, with signs facing west and east, is suspended above the western and central sections of the facade.[a] A stone band course runs above the base.[19]

The 44th Street facade has quoins at the extreme west and east ends on the upper stories.[19] The center of the facade has a projecting double-height loggia of wrought iron, which conceals the fire escape.[5][9][14] The bottom of the loggia contains stone panels, beneath which is a metal base that curves onto the marquee below it. The loggia has three arches are separated by Ionic-style columns. The arches contain wrought-iron grilles, above which are cartouches flanked by foliate decoration. The spandrels above the arches' corners contain wrought-iron foliate decoration and winged animals. A wrought-iron frieze runs above the loggia, and finials are placed on the loggia's roof. On either side of the loggia are two vertical signs with the letters "St. James", which face west and east. These signs have corbels at their bottoms and lanterns on top.[19] At the time of the theater's construction, one observer said that the blank facade was "most appropriate" for the backdrop of an electric sign.[17][20]

The attic has five rectangular windows between two circular windows.[5] Three of the rectangular windows have decorative surrounds that are scrolled at the bottom and eared at the top; they alternate with the other two windows, which have no surrounds. The two circular windows contain surrounds with foliate ornament. The attic is topped by a frieze with circular bellflower decorations, vertical niches, and masks depicting comedy and tragedy. Above that is the cornice, which is simple in design. The cornice, frieze, and quoins are also visible on the eastern wall (facing the Hayes Theater).[19]

Auditorium

The auditorium has an orchestra level, two balconies, boxes, and a stage behind the proscenium arch. The space is designed with plaster decorations in relief, as well as paintings designed to resemble reliefs.[21] Playbill cites the theater as having 1,684 seats,[12] while The Broadway League cites 1,709 seats.[13] Originally, Erlanger's Theatre had 1,600 seats, a comparatively large capacity as the theater was primarily meant to host musicals.[22] The presence of two balconies ran counter to most other theatrical designs of the time, which only had one balcony.[14]

Unlike similar Broadway theaters, the St. James's interior was designed in a simple style without much plasterwork. One contemporary publication described the auditorium as having a "residential rather than theatrical" character.[23] The lack of plasterwork contrasts with the ornate plaster decorations in theaters developed by the Shubert family,[14] as well as those designed by Herbert J. Krapp.[24] Instead, Warren and Wetmore placed emphasis on the interior layout and color scheme.[24][23] As designed, the theater had coral-colored surfaces with antique gold highlights.[9][15] The interior design scheme was overseen by John B. Smeraldi.[9][23] One source described the walls as being "marble and plaster finished in coral lacquer and gold", while the chairs had coral tapestries with gold and blue highlights.[15] After a 1958 renovation, the interior was decorated in charcoal and gold.[25][26]

Seating areas

The orchestra level is wheelchair-accessible via the main doors,[27] and it contains the theater's wheelchair-accessible restrooms.[12][27] The rear or western end of the orchestra contains a shallow promenade. A stair with ornate metal railings leads up from the orchestra promenade to the balcony level. The orchestra level is raked, sloping down toward an orchestra pit in front of the stage,[21] which can fit 40 people.[15] The orchestra's side walls were originally designed to resemble ashlar blocks.[24] The current configuration of the orchestra level dates to a renovation in 1958, during which the orchestra's rear wall was relocated, enlarging the lobby and shrinking the promenade.[28]

The balcony levels can only be accessed by steps.[27] The first balcony level (also known as the mezzanine) is raked and is divided into front and rear sections by an aisle halfway across its depth.[29] The first balcony is much deeper than in similar theaters,[15] reaching over what originally was the tenth row of orchestra seats.[20][24] The second balcony is also raked but is recessed.[15][29] The front of the mezzanine level is curved outward, with molded decorations, and connects with the boxes on either side. An entablature runs near the top of the auditorium, starting from the front of the second balcony level and extending above the boxes and proscenium arch. The undersides of the balcony levels are simple in design and made of plaster.[30] The fronts of both balcony levels have light boxes, and the second balcony also has a technical booth on its rear wall.[31] The side walls were originally designed with murals,[9][24] which were painted by Paul Arndt and depicted romantic themes.[15] The murals were covered up during subsequent modifications to the theater.[26][32]

On either side of the proscenium is a curved wall section with one box at the mezzanine level.[29] Originally, one of the boxes was known as the President's box, while the other was called the Governor's box.[15][24] The fronts of the boxes curve outward and contain plaster moldings.[21] Beside each box are pilasters, which support the entablature above the boxes. There are oval niches on the walls in front of each box, which have busts depicting women.[30] There are also golden urns behind the boxes, next to the mezzanine seating.[24] Draperies were originally hung above the boxes, but they were removed in subsequent renovations.[14] Also above the boxes are lunettes with murals.[24]

Other design features

Next to the boxes is the proscenium, which contains a flat-arched opening surrounded by an elliptical arch. The top corners of the proscenium opening are concave, protruding slightly inward.[29] The proscenium opening is surrounded by an ovolo molding.[30] A mural is placed above the flat-arched opening, beneath the elliptical arch. It shows cupids playing golf while Satan stands amid a "ruined temple of love".[15] The proscenium's original curtain was made of asbestos and was designed by Smeraldi.[9][23] On either side of the flat arch, there are depictions of court jesters pulling the curtains open.[15]

A sounding board curves onto the ceiling above the boxes, in front of the proscenium arch.[29] The sounding board contains molded bands of interlocked leaves and ribbons, which divide it into two sections. The front section (nearer the proscenium) is divided into rectangular-paneled sections with urn, leaf, and swag motifs. The rear section (nearer the balconies) rises from the lunettes above each arch, with a panel at the center, which depicts a musical instrument. The rest of the sounding board's rear section is filled with squares containing rosettes. These squares are laid diagonally in a diamond pattern, which is intended to simulate a coffered ceiling.[30] The ceiling itself is flat, curving downward toward the rear of the second balcony.[29] The center of the ceiling has a plasterwork centerpiece, containing motifs of instruments and swags; a chandelier hangs from this centerpiece.[30] This is surrounded by grilles, which originally served as ventilation openings.[15][30]

Other interior spaces

The lobby, to the west of the orchestra promenade, extends across the width of the auditorium. The lobby is divided into outer and inner sections, with the box office in the lobby's outer section.[9][15] The lobby's inner section originally contained a 17th-century Flemish tapestry on the west wall and a green-and-white marble table, which were the only furnishings in the room. The inner lobby had black-and-white terrazzo marble tiles surrounded by a band of black marble and black-and-white squares. The room also had gray-stone walls with black-and-gold marble decorations, as well as a polychrome-and-gold ceiling with lights. Three black-and-gold marble doorways led to the auditorium. The south portion of the inner lobby had a gray marble staircase with a polychrome-and-gold balustrade and an ebony-wood railing.[15] The lobby was enlarged and modified during a 1958 renovation.[28]

The theater was designed with a ladies' lounge in the basement and a men's lounge on the mezzanine.[33] The ladies' lounge had Adam style decorations and a rose-and-gold color scheme; it included a marble shelf with a mirror, as well as ceiling vents. The mezzanine lounge had a gray-green color scheme and was indirectly lit by lamps hidden behind silk curtains. The lounge was 50 feet (15 m) long and was connected with restrooms, telephone booths, and a writing room via a gray-green corridor. Additionally, a men's club room was placed in the basement and was decorated in a Tudor style, with a large fireplace and plaster walls.[15]

Backstage, the dressing rooms could accommodate 150 cast members; the stars had their own suites with baths. The musicians had their own quarters, which connected to the orchestra pit.[15] Jujamcyn Theaters' corporate offices are also at 246 West 44th Street, the St. James Theatre building.[34][35]

History

Times Square became the epicenter for large-scale theater productions between 1900 and the Great Depression.[36] At the beginning of the 20th century, Erlanger was a founding member of the Theatrical Syndicate, and he worked with Marc Klaw to run Klaw and Erlanger, the predominant theatrical booking agency in the United States. They developed two major theaters on nearby 42nd Street: the still-extant New Amsterdam Theatre and the no-longer-operational Liberty Theatre.[37] Klaw and Erlanger continued to work together until a dispute in 1919.[37][38] Soon after the breakup, Erlanger began planning a dozen theaters in the U.S., including three in New York City.[39]

Development and early years

Seen from the east
Seen from the east

Erlanger proposed his first new theater in New York City in 1921,[40][41] when he hired Warren and Wetmore to draw up plans for a 1,200-seat theater on 44th Street, named the Model Theatre.[42][43] The venue would have been a single-story structure at 246–256 West 46th Street (the current site of the St. James), which would have cost $300,000.[44] The plans were delayed due to Erlanger's disputes with the Shubert brothers, another major theatrical syndicate, and with Klaw.[40] At the time, the Shubert brothers' theaters were generally designed by Herbert J. Krapp, while Klaw's were designed by Eugene De Rosa; both Krapp and De Rosa were experienced theater architects.[45] By contrast, while Warren and Wetmore were well known for designing houses, hotels, and office buildings, as well as collaborating on the design of Grand Central Terminal and the surrounding Terminal City building complex, they had never previously designed a theater.[46] It is unknown why Erlanger hired the firm to design his theater.[5]

The plans were completed in 1922.[40] Erlanger made an agreement that December to instead develop the theater for revues, specifically for vaudeville duo Bernard and Collier; in exchange, the pair would not perform outside New York City.[47][48] That plan also failed for unknown reasons.[5] Finally, in February 1926, Erlanger announced a third proposal: a two-balcony, 1,600-seat venue named Erlanger's Theatre, which would cost $1 million and be comparable in size to the New Amsterdam Theatre. Warren and Wetmore were still associated with the project.[6][33]

By May 1927, the theater was reportedly ready for A. L. Erlanger to inspect.[49] That July, Erlanger announced that he had booked George M. Cohan's The Merry Malones as the inaugural production.[18] The theater opened on September 26, 1927, with The Merry Malones,[50][51][52] which ultimately ran for 192 performances.[53][54] Erlanger assumed full control of the theater's operation a month after the venue opened.[55] The run of The Merry Malones was interrupted briefly in early 1928 by a flop entitled The Behavior of Mrs. Crane.[53][56] Cohan's last musical, Billie,[22] opened in 1928 and had 112 performances.[53][57] The next year, Lew Fields starred in Hello, Daddy, which had transferred from the Mansfield Theatre.[53][58] The other runs of 1929 included Murray Anderson's Almanac[59][60] and Ladies of the Jury.[59][61]

A. L. Erlanger died in March 1930, but his estate continued to operate the theater.[62] In that year, Erlanger's Theatre hosted a revival of The Rivals,[59][63] followed by the popular musical Fine and Dandy,[50][64] the latter of which had 246 performances.[59][65] In 1931, the Civic Light Opera Company leased the Erlanger for Gilbert and Sullivan productions.[66][67] The theatrical company occupied the Erlanger for the next year,[67] presenting a variety of operettas from Gilbert and Sullivan and from other writers.[68] After A. L. Erlanger's estate failed to pay rent,[69] ownership of the theater reverted to the Astor family, the owners of the underlying land.[70][71]

Vroom operation

In July 1932, Gilbert Miller's former manager Lodewick Vroom announced that he had acquired the Erlanger from the Astors.[71][72] Shortly afterward, Vroom renamed the venue the St. James,[73][74][75] after London's St James's Theatre.[76] The revue Walk a Little Faster was the first show at the renamed St. James,[77] opening in December 1932 with Bobby Clark, Paul McCullough, and Bea Lillie;[78] it ran for 121 performances.[79][80] The St. James hosted another season of Gilbert and Sullivan productions in 1933,[77] also presented by the Civic Light Opera Company.[68][81] The Ballets Russes de Monte-Carlo opened at the St. James in December 1933,[82][83] staying through April 1934[82][b] with performers including Irina Baronova, Léonide Massine, and Tamara Toumanova.[85] This was the Ballets Russes' last performance in the U.S. for fifty years.[86] Clark and McCullough reappeared in the 1935 revue Thumbs Up!,[77][87] which had 156 performances.[79][88] Also successful was the operetta May Wine in 1935,[89][90] which stayed for 212 performances.[79][88]

The Works Progress Administration (WPA), an agency of the U.S. government, held interviews in the St. James for its Federal Theatre Project during 1936.[91] Next were two Shakespeare revivals in 1937: Hamlet with John Gielgud[89][92][93] and Richard II with Maurice Evans.[77][94][95] The latter was one of several Shakespeare productions that Margaret Webster directed at the St. James.[96] Later that year, the St. James showed Father Malachy's Miracle for 125 performances.[97][98] The WPA leased the theater in April 1938 for its production of Trojan Incident,[99][100] prompting the League of New York Theatres to complain that the government had an undue advantage over private producers.[101] Evans returned that October in an unabridged version of Hamlet, starring Katherine Locke, Mady Christians, and Alexander Scourby;[102] this was the first time that the full text of Hamlet was performed in the U.S.[89] The Hamlet revival ran for 96 performances[103][104] and was followed in early 1939 by King Henry IV, Part 1 with Evans and Edmond O'Brien,[105][106] which stayed for 74 performances.[103][107]

In January 1940, the St. James hosted that year's version of Earl Carroll's Vanities;[108][109] reviewers criticized the show's short run because it used microphones for amplification.[110] Evans returned that April, reviving the production of Richard II from three years earlier.[111][112] That November, the St. James hosted another Shakespeare production: Twelfth Night with Evans, Wesley Addy, Helen Hayes, Sophie Stewart, and June Walker.[113][114] This was followed the next March by Paul Green and Richard Wright's Native Son,[115][116] which was not as successful as previous shows, with 114 performances.[117][118]

Shubert operation

The Shubert Organization started operating the St. James in July 1941[119] and immediately booked the play Anne of England.[120] From January to March 1942, the St. James hosted the Boston Comic Opera Company and the Jooss Ballet Dance Theatre in repertory.[110] The Boston Opera Company presented Gilbert and Sullivan works, which were performed simultaneously with dance shows such as Kurt Jooss's The Green Table.[121][122] The same year, the theater hosted a transfer of the long-running play Claudia,[117][123][124] as well as the Theatre Guild comedy Without Love with Audrey Christie, Katharine Hepburn, and Elliott Nugent.[110][125][126] The Theater Guild, which had seen little success with their shows to date,[110] premiered Rodgers and Hammerstein's first musical, Oklahoma!, at the St. James in March 1943.[127][128] Vincent Astor sold the theater to the Shuberts later the same year.[129] With over 2,200 performances[c] through 1948,[134][132] Oklahoma! saved the Theatre Guild from bankruptcy[133][135] and became known as a Rodgers and Hammerstein masterpiece.[135]

Frank Loesser's Where's Charley? opened at the St. James in 1948,[136][137] ultimately seeing 762 performances over two years.[134][138] Where's Charley? closed to make way for another musical, Peter Pan, which had been forced to relocate from the Imperial Theatre.[139][140] This was followed by yet another set of Gilbert and Sullivan shows, this time performed by the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company.[141][142] Later that year, the St. James premiered the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The King and I,[136][143] which ran for 1,246 performances over three years.[134][144] George Abbott's The Pajama Game was the next show to premiere at the St. James, opening in 1954[115][145] and running for 1,061 performances.[117][146] In 1956, the Johnny Mercer musical Li'l Abner opened,[115][147] and ran for 693 performances.[117][148]

Jujamcyn operation

Side view of the loggia
Side view of the loggia

By the 1950s, the Shuberts operated nearly half of all legitimate theaters in New York City, prompting the U.S. federal government to file an antitrust suit against the family. As part of a settlement made in February 1956, the Shuberts had to sell off some of their theaters.[149][150] If the Shuberts did not sell the St. James within two years, they had to lease out either the St. James or the Imperial.[150] In May 1956, a group headed by businessman Jerome S. Jennings offered the Shuberts $2.1 million for the St. James Theatre.[151][152] The sale was finalized that July, when Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing president William L. McKnight and theatrical executive Samuel H. Schwartz agreed to buy the St. James for $1.75 million in cash.[153][154] Schwartz was then appointed president of the Jujamcyn Corporation, an entity formed to operate the theater.[155] Li'l Abner continued to run during this time.[153]

1950s to 1970s

McKnight spent $600,000 to restore the St. James during three months in 1958.[17][26] The interior was extensively modified,[26][32] while the exterior remained relatively intact.[17] Under designer Frederick Fox, the exterior was painted green and gold, while the interior was decorated in gold and charcoal gray. The curtains, carpets, and seats were replaced; the adjacent alley was converted to a smoking area; and new electronic systems were installed.[25][26][156] The first show at the renovated theater was Rodgers and Hammerstein's Flower Drum Song, which opened in December 1958[156][157] and ran for 600 performances.[158] The St. James next hosted a transfer of the off-Broadway hit Once Upon a Mattress with Carol Burnett in 1960.[159][156][160] This was followed the same year by Jean Anouilh's play Becket, with Laurence Olivier and Anthony Quinn,[161][162][163] and the Betty Comden/Adolph Green/Jule Styne musical Do Re Mi, with Nancy Walker and Phil Silvers.[161][164][165] Another Comden/Green/Styne musical arrived in 1961: Subways Are for Sleeping, featuring Orson Bean, Sydney Chaplin, Carol Lawrence, and Phyllis Newman.[161][166][167]

Further modifications to the St. James were made in 1962.[10] The same year, the theater hosted the musical Mr. President,[168][169] which was Irving Berlin's last Broadway show and was not popularly received.[156] The next production at the St. James was John Osborne's Luther, which opened in 1963 and featured Albert Finney.[170][171][172] The Jerry Herman and Michael Stewart musical Hello, Dolly! opened at the St. James in January 1964, originally featuring Carol Channing and David Burns.[173][174] With 2,844 performances through 1970,[170][175] Hello, Dolly! was the longest-running Broadway musical when it closed.[176][177] This was followed in 1971 by Galt MacDermot and John Guare's version of Shakespeare's Two Gentlemen of Verona,[178][179] featuring Raul Julia, Clifton Davis, and Jonelle Allen for 613 performances.[170][180]

For much of the mid-1970s, the St. James hosted short-lived revivals.[181] For instance, a 1973 revival of A Streetcar Named Desire, with Alan Feinstein and Lois Nettleton,[182] ended after only 53 performances.[183][184] An even shorter show was the 1974 revival of the musical Good News, with Alice Faye and Gene Nelson, which ran 16 times.[183][185][186] This was followed in 1975 by the revival of The Misanthrope with Alec McCowen and Diana Rigg,[187] which had 94 performances,[183][185] as well as the musical revue A Musical Jubilee,[188] which had 92 performances.[183][189] In 1976, McKnight transferred the St. James and Jujamcyn's other venues to his daughter Virginia and her husband James H. Binger.[190] The same year, the theater hosted a revival of My Fair Lady,[181][191][192] which relocated at the end of 1976 to make way for George Abbott's musical Music Is.[193] The next hit was Comden and Green's musical On the Twentieth Century, which opened in 1978[178][194] and had over 450 performances.[183][195] Four short runs followed in 1979 and 1980: Carmelina, Broadway Opry '79, The 1940's Radio Hour, and Filumena.[196]

1980s and 1990s

Marquee
Marquee

The musical Barnum premiered in 1980, starring Jim Dale with music by Michael Stewart, Cy Coleman, and Mark Bramble;[178][197] it had 854 performances over the next two years.[198][199][200] The next show was the 1982 revue Rock 'N Roll! The First 5,000 Years, which flopped after a week.[201][202] Following this was another long run, the musical My One and Only, which opened in 1983[178][203] and ran for 767 performances.[198][204] The stage floor and traps were replaced after My One and Only's run ended. In July 1985, Jujamcyn announced a $1.5 million renovation for the theater.[205] The changes, executed by Total Concept,[206] included a new marquee, seats, draperies, and carpets, as well as a repainted auditorium and new electrical wiring.[205][206] Due to the relatively small budget and the project's eighteen-week schedule, the lighting was not changed; additionally, some of the original details could not be restored.[206] The theater reopened in December 1985 with the revue Jerry's Girls,[207] which lasted four months.[208][209] Afterward, the long-running musical 42nd Street transferred from the Majestic in 1987,[210] extending its run for two years.[211][212] The St. James's last shows of the decade were Bill Irwin's play Largely New York[213][214] and a revival of the musical Gypsy with Tyne Daly in 1989.[215] The latter ran for more than a year.[216]

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) had started to consider protecting the St. James as a landmark in 1982,[217] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[218] The LPC designated the St. James's facade and interior as a landmark on December 15, 1987.[219] This was part of the commission's wide-ranging effort in 1987 to grant landmark status to Broadway theaters.[220] The New York City Board of Estimate ratified the designations in March 1988.[221] Jujamcyn, the Nederlanders, and the Shuberts collectively sued the LPC in June 1988 to overturn the landmark designations of 22 theaters, including the St. James, on the merit that the designations severely limited the extent to which the theaters could be modified.[222] The lawsuit was escalated to the New York Supreme Court and the Supreme Court of the United States, but these designations were ultimately upheld in 1992.[223]

The musical The Secret Garden, starring Daisy Eagan and Mandy Patinkin, opened in 1991[224][225] and ran for 706 performances over two years.[226][227] This was followed in 1993 by The Who's Tommy,[228][229] which also ran for two years, accumulating 900 performances.[230][231] The next production was supposed to be the musical Busker Alley in 1995, for which LeRoy Neiman painted a 40-foot-tall (12 m) mural on the theater's facade.[232] The musical's Broadway run was canceled after its star Tommy Tune broke his foot, and the mural was painted over.[233] The Stephen Sondheim musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum was revived in 1996[234] and ultimately ran for 715 performances.[235][236] This was followed by a limited engagement by singer Patti LaBelle in January 1998,[237][238] as well as a 98-performance run of the musical High Society the same year.[239][240] The St. James underwent a $3 million, eight-month renovation,[241] conducted by EverGreene Architectural Arts.[242] When the theater reopened in 1999, it hosted a short run of the musical The Civil War[243][244][245] and a year-long run of the dance revue Swing!.[246][247]

2000s to present

Seen in 2006, during the run of The Producers
Seen in 2006, during the run of The Producers

Swing! closed in January 2001[246] and was replaced by Mel Brooks's musical The Producers, which broke a ticket-sale record when it opened in April 2001.[248] Due to high demand, The Producers' producers started reserving premium seat tickets at the theatre in a will call system to prevent scalping, the first time any Broadway show had done this. Prior to the implementation of this policy, brokers would buy tickets for $100 and resell them for as much as $742.50; though such markups were illegal in New York state, the tickets were sold on websites that were based in other states.[249] After Binger died in 2004,[250] Rocco Landesman bought the St. James and Jujamcyn's four other theaters in 2005, along with the air rights above them.[251] Jordan Roth joined Jujamcyn as a resident producer the same year.[252] The Producers ultimately lasted until 2007, with 2,502 performances.[253][254] It was followed the same year by a limited run of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas!,[255][256] which opened one day before the start of the 2007 Broadway stagehand strike; a New York Supreme Court judge ruled that forced to keep operating during the strike.[257] The St. James then hosted a revival of Gypsy in 2008, featuring Patti LuPone, Laura Benanti, and Boyd Gaines.[258][259]

In 2009, Roth acquired a 50 percent stake in Jujamcyn and assumed full operation of the firm when Landesman joined the National Endowments of the Arts.[260][261] The same year, the St. James staged the Goodman Theatre's revival of Desire Under the Elms[262][263] and the City Center Encores production of Finian's Rainbow.[264][265] In the early 2010s, the St. James hosted musicals along with limited-engagement concerts. These included American Idiot in 2010; Hair and On a Clear Day You Can See Forever in 2011; Leap of Faith and Bring It On: The Musical in 2012; Barry Manilow's concert and Let It Be in 2013; and Bullets Over Broadway and Side Show in 2014.[12][13] Part of the stage-left portion of the theater was demolished to accommodate the set for Bullets Over Broadway.[266] Afterward, Something Rotten! opened in 2015[267] and ran for a year and a half.[268] A revival of the play Present Laughter was then hosted in 2017.[269][270]

After Second Stage Theater bought the adjacent Hayes Theater, in 2016, Roth approached Second Stage about the possibility of simultaneously renovating both theaters.[266] Second Stage sold the alley between the theaters to Jujamcyn, which extended the St. James's stage 10 feet (3.0 m) eastward into the alley.[271][272] The stage expansion was completed for the Disney musical Frozen,[273][274] which opened in March 2018.[275][276] Frozen achieved the box office record for the St. James Theatre,[277] grossing $2,624,495 over eight performances for the week ending December 30, 2018.[278] On March 12, 2020, the theater closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic;[279] Frozen closed as a result.[280] The St. James was the first Broadway house to reopen after the pandemic-related closure,[281] with a limited run of Bruce Springsteen's Springsteen on Broadway shows opening on June 26, 2021.[282] As part of a settlement with the United States Department of Justice in 2021, Jujamcyn agreed to improve disabled access at its five Broadway theaters, including the St. James.[283][284] David Byrne's American Utopia opened later the same year and ran until early 2022.[285]

Notable productions

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ One marquee is suspended above the lobby doors and stage door, with a sign facing west. The other is suspended above the auditorium doors and service doors, with a sign facing east.
  2. ^ The Ballet Russe had a short gap from January to March 1934.[84]
  3. ^ Variously cited as 2,248,[130] 2,243,[131] 2,212,[132] or 2,202.[133]
  4. ^ The following plays appeared at least once: The Mikado, H.M.S. Pinafore, Iolanthe, The Gondoliers, Patience, The Pirates of Penzance, Trial by Jury, and Ruddigore. Several Gilbert and Sullivan plays had multiple discontinuous runs in 1931, and H.M.S. Pinafore was performed both by itself and with Trial by Jury.[289]
  5. ^ The Mikado, Yeomen of the Guard, H.M.S. Pinafore/Trial by Jury, Patience[296]
  6. ^ This specific production of Richard II was revived in 1940.[112][302]
  7. ^ H.M.S. Pinafore/The Green Table, The Mikado/The Big City/A Ball in Old Vienna, The Pirates of Penzance/The Prodigal Sun, Iolanthe, Trial by Jury, The Gondoliers[302]
  8. ^ The Mikado, Trial by Jury/H.M.S. Pinafore, The Gondoliers, Iolanthe, Cox and Box[130]

Citations

  1. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 1.
  2. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 1.
  3. ^ a b White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot & Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 299. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
  4. ^ a b c "246 West 44 Street, 10036". New York City Department of City Planning. Retrieved November 17, 2021.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 12.
  6. ^ a b "Erlanger to Build Theatre in 44th St.; Big Playhouse to Be Like the New Amsterdam and to Cost Approximately $1,000,000". The New York Times. February 17, 1926. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  7. ^ Grimes, William (January 4, 2007). "Owner of Sardi's Restaurant Dies at 91". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  8. ^ Morrone, Francis (2009). Architectural Guidebook to New York City. Gibbs Smith, Publisher. p. 201. ISBN 978-1-4236-1116-5.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g Stevenson, Paul (September 18, 1927). "New $1,500,000 Erlanger Theater Is One of New York's Show Places". The Atlanta Constitution. p. 25. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  10. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  11. ^ "Erlanger's New Theatre; Playhouse in West 44th Street Is to Open in September". The New York Times. May 10, 1927. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  12. ^ a b c d e f "St. James Theatre (1932) New York, NY". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  13. ^ a b c The Broadway League (October 17, 2021). "St. James Theatre – New York, NY". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  14. ^ a b c d e f Morrison, William (1999). Broadway Theatres: History and Architecture. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications. p. 153. ISBN 0-486-40244-4.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "Architectural Features of New Erlanger Theater, New York". The Christian Science Monitor. October 13, 1927. p. 12. ProQuest 512226941.
  16. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 15–16.
  17. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  18. ^ a b "Cohan Play to Open Erlanger Theatre; 'The Merry Malones,' Musical Comedy, Booked at New House on West 44th Street". The New York Times. July 16, 1927. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  19. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 16.
  20. ^ a b "The Erlanger Theater, New York City". Architecture and Building. Vol. 59. September 1927. p. 312.
  21. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 17–18.
  22. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 229; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 257.
  23. ^ a b c d "New Erlanger Theatre". The Pittsburgh Press. October 2, 1927. p. 93. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 13.
  25. ^ a b Funke, Lewis (November 30, 1958). "News and Gossip of the Rialto; Rejuvenated St. James Theatre Makes Bow Tomorrow -- Items". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  26. ^ a b c d e Gleason, Gene (November 29, 1958). "St. James Theater All Spruced Up". New York Herald Tribune. p. 3. ProQuest 1327642926.
  27. ^ a b c "St. James Theatre". Jujamcyn Theaters. June 19, 2019. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  28. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 19.
  29. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 17.
  30. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 18.
  31. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 18–19.
  32. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 14.
  33. ^ a b Allen, Kelcey (February 17, 1926). "Amusements: Erlanger's Theatre To Cost A Million". Women's Wear. Vol. 32, no. 40. p. 16. ProQuest 1676684207.
  34. ^ Grange, William (2020). The Business of American Theatre. Taylor & Francis. p. 238. ISBN 978-1-000-07471-0.
  35. ^ "About Us". Jujamcyn Theaters. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  36. ^ Swift, Christopher (2018). "The City Performs: An Architectural History of NYC Theater". New York City College of Technology, City University of New York. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  37. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 8.
  38. ^ "Klaw & Erlanger to End Partnership". The New York Times. June 27, 1919. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  39. ^ "Erlanger's New Theatres; He is to Build Twelve in Four Cities, Three in New York". The New York Times. August 5, 1919. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  40. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 11.
  41. ^ "New Theater to Go Up Soon: Erlanger's "Model" To Be "Drawing-Room House"". New-York Tribune. May 20, 1921. p. 10. ProQuest 576392634.
  42. ^ "Erlanger's New Theatre, the Model". The New York Times. May 20, 1921. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  43. ^ "Plans of New Model Theater". The Billboard. Vol. 33, no. 26. June 18, 1921. p. 7. ProQuest 1031642408.
  44. ^ "New Buildings; One-Story Theatre for Forty-Fourth Street to Cost $300,000". The New York Times. October 4, 1921. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  45. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 9.
  46. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 10.
  47. ^ "Bernard and Collier to Have Music Hall; A.L. Erlanger to Build a Theatre in Forty-Fourth Street as a Permanent Home of Revue". The New York Times. December 9, 1922. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  48. ^ "Bernard arid Collier Sign For Revue Next Season". New-York Tribune. December 9, 1922. p. 8. ProQuest 576717317.
  49. ^ "Erlanger's Theatre Ready; Producer to Inspect New House In 44th Street In a Few Days". The New York Times. May 26, 1927. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  50. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 229; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 257; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  51. ^ "The Merry Malones' Opens New Erlanger; George M. Cohan Shines in His Own Tuneful Musical Comedy Racy of Irish and Politics". The New York Times. September 27, 1927. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  52. ^ "The Merry Malones". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. September 27, 1927. p. 34. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  53. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 257; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 22.
  54. ^ The Broadway League (September 26, 1927). "The Merry Malones – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
    "The Merry Malones (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1927)". Playbill. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  55. ^ "Review 1 -- No Title". New York Herald Tribune. October 20, 1927. p. 17. ProQuest 1131400960.
  56. ^ The Broadway League (March 20, 1928). "The Behavior of Mrs. Crane – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
    "The Behavior of Mrs. Crane (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1928)". Playbill. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  57. ^ The Broadway League (October 1, 1928). "Billie – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
    "Billie (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1928)". Playbill. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  58. ^ The Broadway League (December 26, 1928). "Hello, Daddy – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 28, 2021.
    "Hello, Daddy Broadway @ Lew Fields' Mansfield Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 28, 2021.
  59. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 257; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  60. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (August 15, 1929). "The Play; Murray Anderson Revues". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  61. ^ "Ten Plays to End Their Runs Tonight; Gillette's Revival of "Sherlock Holmes" and Mrs. Fiske's Comedy Among the Closings". The New York Times. January 4, 1930. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  62. ^ "A.L. Erlanger Dies After Long Illness; Largest Individual Owner of Playhouses and Former 'Czar' of Stage Succumbs at 69". The New York Times. March 8, 1930. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  63. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 13, 1930). "The Rivals – Broadway Play – 1930 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "The Rivals (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  64. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (September 24, 1930). "The Play; Presenting Joe Cook". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  65. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 23, 1930). "Fine and Dandy – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "Fine and Dandy (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  66. ^ "Gilbert and Sullivan Operettas Here May 4; Milton Aborn's Company to Begin Series With 'The Mikado' at Erlanger's Theatre". The New York Times. April 25, 1931. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  67. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 257–258.
  68. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  69. ^ "Astor Files Suit To Dispossess Erlanger Firm: Theater Rental Action Is Added to Litigation Involving Producer's Estate". New York Herald Tribune. June 22, 1932. p. 19. ProQuest 1114524657.
  70. ^ "Legitimate: New Amsterdam Ouster Proceedings Technical Move for Jumbled Estate". Variety. Vol. 107, no. 8. August 2, 1932. p. 45. ProQuest 1529364780.
  71. ^ a b "Legitimate: Erlanger's Lose Name House". The Billboard. Vol. 44, no. 31. July 30, 1932. p. 14. ProQuest 1032005091.
  72. ^ "Vroom to Operate Erlanger's Theatre; Manager Says He Represents a Group Who Obtained Playhouse From Vincent Astor". The New York Times. July 21, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  73. ^ "Name of Erlanger in Lights No More". Daily News. August 5, 1932. p. 450. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  74. ^ "News of the Theaters: 'Domino' to Open Aug. 16; Lodewick Vroom Leases the Erlanger Theater". New York Herald Tribune. August 5, 1932. p. 8. ProQuest 1221283956.
  75. ^ "Ban on 'Scrapbook' Dropped by Equity; Council Reverses Stand After Hearing Players and Classes Production as Vaudeville". The New York Times. August 6, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  76. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 229; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 258.
  77. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 229; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 258; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  78. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (December 8, 1932). "Beatrice Lillie and Clark and McCullough in "Walk a Little Faster."". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  79. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 258; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  80. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 7, 1932). "Walk a Little Faster – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "Walk a Little Faster (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1932)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  81. ^ "News of the Theaters: Casting of 'enchantment' Completed Aborn Opens 'the Mikado' April 17 Laurette Taylor". New York Herald Tribune. April 4, 1933. p. 10. ProQuest 1221794168.
  82. ^ a b c The Broadway League (December 25, 1933). "Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1934)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  83. ^ Martin, John (December 23, 1933). "New Ballet Russe Warmly Greeted; Monte Carlo Ensemble Charms a Fashionable Audience in Debut at St. James Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  84. ^ "Monte Carlo Ballet Back With New Items; Reopening at St. James Theatre Friday With De Falla, Auric and Tchaikovsky Numbers". The New York Times. March 6, 1934. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  85. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 258–259; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  86. ^ Kisselgoff, Anna (September 25, 1983). "Dance View; the 'Ballets Russes' Legacy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  87. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (December 28, 1934). "'Thumbs Up,' a Revue, Is Staged by Eddie Dowling at the St. James". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  88. ^ a b c The Broadway League (December 27, 1934). "Thumbs Up! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "Thumbs Up! (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1934)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  89. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 229; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 259.
  90. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (December 6, 1935). "The Play; 'May Wine,' a Musical Drama With Book and Tunes But No Chorus". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  91. ^ "300 Actors Seek WPA Theatre Jobs; Apply for Parts in Musical Comedy, Vaudeville and Circus Units of Project". The New York Times. November 2, 1935. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  92. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 8, 1936). "Hamlet – Broadway Play – 1936 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "May Wine Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  93. ^ "Gielgud Is Cheered as 'Hamlet' Run Ends; Capacity Crowds See Star in Final Two PerformancesActed Role 132 Times". The New York Times. January 31, 1937. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  94. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 5, 1937). "King Richard II – Broadway Play – 1937 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "King Richard II Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  95. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (February 6, 1937). "The Play; Maurice Evans and Ian Keith Appearing in a Revival of Shakespeare's 'King Richard II' Ovation for Evans". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  96. ^ Bloom 2007, pp. 229–230; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 259–260.
  97. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 259; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  98. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 17, 1937). "Father Malachy's Miracle – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Father Malachy's Miracle Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  99. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (April 22, 1938). "The Play; Women of Troy According to a Federal Theatre Pattern in Dance, Song and Drama". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  100. ^ Watts, Richard, Jr. (April 22, 1938). "The Theaters: Isabel Bonner". New York Herald Tribune. p. 12. ProQuest 1242963920.
  101. ^ "WPA Opening Protested; Group Calls St. James Theatre necessary. Plan 'Unfair Competition'". The New York Times. April 7, 1938. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  102. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 13, 1938). "The Play; Maurice Evans Makes a Night of It in the Uncut Text of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' Audience Stays to Cheer Evans". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  103. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 260; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  104. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 12, 1938). "Hamlet – Broadway Play – 1938 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Hamlet Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  105. ^ a b Bloom 2007, pp. 229–230; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 260; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  106. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (January 31, 1939). "The Play; Maurice Evans Appears as Falstaff in a Revival of Shakespeare's "Henry IV," Part 1". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  107. ^ The Broadway League (January 30, 1939). "King Henry IV, Part I – Broadway Play – 1939 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "King Henry IV, Part I Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  108. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 13, 1940). "Earl Carroll's Vanities [1940] – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Earl Carroll's Vanities of 1940 Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  109. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (January 15, 1940). "The Play; Earl Carroll's 'Vanities' Comes East From Hollywood With Some of Those Girls". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  110. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 230; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 260.
  111. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (April 2, 1940). "The Play; Maurice Evans Returns for a Limited Engagement in Shakespeare's 'King Richard II'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  112. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 1, 1940). "King Richard II – Broadway Play – 1940 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "King Richard II Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  113. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 20, 1940). "The Play; Helen Hayes and Maurice Evans Appear in a Revival of Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  114. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 19, 1940). "Twelfth Night – Broadway Play – 1940 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Twelfth Night Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  115. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 230; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 260; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  116. ^ "News of the Stage; Orson Welles's Production of 'Native Son' Opens This Evening at the St. James -- Casting Notes". The New York Times. March 24, 1941. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  117. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 260; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  118. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 24, 1941). "Native Son – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Native Son Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  119. ^ "13 New Plays Set for Rural Houses; Next Week's Schedule Includes Large List of Tryouts for Monday Night". The New York Times. July 19, 1941. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  120. ^ "Metro Will Film 'Norths' Mystery; Acquires for $30,000 Picture Rights to the Story Which Owen Davis Dramatized". The New York Times. July 25, 1941. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  121. ^ "Two Premieres Set for Tonight; ' Jason' to Open at the Hudson With Ballet and 'Pinafore' at the St. James". The New York Times. January 21, 1942. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  122. ^ "Boston Savoyards Open Season Here Wednesday". New York Herald Tribune. January 18, 1942. p. E2. ProQuest 1266883490.
  123. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 12, 1941). "Claudia – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Claudia Broadway @ Booth Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  124. ^ K.s (May 25, 1942). "The Play; The Return of 'Claudia'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  125. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 10, 1942). "Without Love – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Without Love Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  126. ^ "Hepburn Vehicle Premiere Tonight; Theatre Guild's 25th Season to Start at the St. James With 'Without Love'". The New York Times. November 10, 1942. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  127. ^ Nichols, Lewis (April 1, 1943). "The Play; 'Oklahoma!' a Musical Hailed as Delightful, Based on 'Green Grow the Lilacs,' Opens Here at the St. James Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  128. ^ ""Oklahoma" A Radiant Show Of Color, Motion And Period Style: Guild Production At St. James Theatre A Designer's Stimulant —Chartreuse, Coral And Violet Blues In Rich Color Schemes". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 66, no. 64. April 2, 1943. p. 5. ProQuest 1654263951.
  129. ^ "Astor Disposes Of 2 Theaters In W. 44th St: Shuberts Buy St. James; Nora Bayes House Goes to the 'New York Times'". New York Herald Tribune. September 4, 1943. p. 20. ProQuest 1282800001.
  130. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  131. ^ "Great Performances . Artists . Oscar Hammerstein II - PBS". PBS. February 16, 2005. Archived from the original on February 16, 2005. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  132. ^ a b c The Broadway League (March 31, 1943). "Oklahoma! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Oklahoma! Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  133. ^ a b Schumach, Murray (May 30, 1948). "'Oklahoma!' Ends Broadway Run With 2,500% Net on Investment; Tunes Familiar for Five Years Cheered as Lustily as in Nostalgic Days -- Show Carried Needy Theatre Guild to Affluence". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  134. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 261; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  135. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 230; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 261.
  136. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 230; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 261; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  137. ^ Zolotow, Sam (October 11, 1948). "Bolger Will Star in Musical Tonight; 'Where's Charley?', Adapted by Abbott From the Thomas Farce, Due at St. James". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  138. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 11, 1948). "Where's Charley? – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Where's Charley? Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  139. ^ Calta, Louis (August 12, 1950). "'Peter Pan' Gets New Fall House; Barrie Classic Will Be Moved to St. James Theatre When 'Call Me Madam' Arrives". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  140. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 261.
  141. ^ Allen, Kelcey (January 30, 1951). "Theatres: Amusements: D'oyly Carte Opera Company Returns". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 82, no. 21. p. 50. ProQuest 1522586584.
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  143. ^ Calta, Louis (March 29, 1951). "Premiere Tonight of 'The King and I'; New Rodgers and Hammerstein Musical, Starring Gertrude Lawrence, at St. James". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
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    "The King and I Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  145. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (May 14, 1954). "Theatre in Review: 'Pajama Game'; Musical Comedy Has Debut at St. James". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
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    "The Pajama Game Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  147. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 16, 1956). "Theatre: 'Li'l Abner'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
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    "Li'l Abner Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  149. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 230; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  150. ^ a b Ranzal, Edward (February 18, 1956). "Shubert Consents to Break Up Chain; Decree Calls for Sale of 12 Theatres in 6 Cities and Give Up Booking Unit". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  151. ^ "Group Offers 2 Million For Shubert's St. James". New York Herald Tribune. May 19, 1956. p. 6. ProQuest 1327599273.
  152. ^ Calta, Louis (May 19, 1956). "$2,100,000 Is Bid for the St. James; Offer Made to Shubert for Theatre That Must Be Sold Under Consent Decree Cullman Backs Merman Show Whisky and Drama". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  153. ^ a b Zolotow, Sam (July 30, 1957). "Playhouse Here Sold by Shuberts; St. James Relinquished Under Terms of Court Decree for Reported $1,750,000 Sig Arno Returning". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  154. ^ "Shuberts Loose Hold on St. James Theatre". Daily News. July 30, 1957. p. 63. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  155. ^ Schonberg, Harold C. (March 14, 1982). "The Schuberts and the Nederlanders Have a Revival". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  156. ^ a b c d e Bloom 2007, p. 231; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 262.
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  159. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 11, 1959). "Once Upon a Mattress – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  160. ^ Nichols, Lewis (May 8, 1960). "Once Upon a Mattress' Has Made Strenuous Tour of Manhattan". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
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    "Becket Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  163. ^ Taubman, Howabd (October 6, 1960). "The Theatre: French View of 'Becket'; Laurence Olivier Stars in Anouilh Version Anthony Quinn Also in Cast at the St. James". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  164. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 26, 1960). "Do Re Mi – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Do Re Mi Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  165. ^ Taubman, Howard (December 27, 1960). "The Theatre: 'Do Re Mi,' a Musical Fast and Loud; Kanin, Comden, Green and Styne Show Here Phil Silvers and Nancy Walker Head Cast". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
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    "Subways Are for Sleeping Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  167. ^ Boston, Maurice Zolotow (December 17, 1961). "'Subways' in Transit". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  168. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 20, 1962). "Mr. President – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  169. ^ Taubman, Howard (October 22, 1962). "Theater: Irving Berlin's 'President'; Musical Opens at the St. James Theater Robert Ryan Co-Stars With Nanette Fabray". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  170. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 262; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  171. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 25, 1963). "Luther – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
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  172. ^ Taubman, Howard (September 26, 1963). "Theater: 'Luther' Stars Albert Finney; John Osborne Drama Is at the St. James". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  173. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 231; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 262–263; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  174. ^ "Theater: 'Hello, Dolly!' Has Premiere; Carol Channing Star of Musical at St. James". The New York Times. January 17, 1964. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  175. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 16, 1964). "Hello, Dolly! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Hello, Dolly! Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  176. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 262.
  177. ^ Phillips, McCandlish (December 28, 1970). "Broadway Bids 'Dolly!' a Fond Adieu". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  178. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 231; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 263; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  179. ^ Shepard, Richard F. (December 3, 1971). "They Put 'Verona' On Broadway Map". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
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  181. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 231; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 263.
  182. ^ Barnes, Clive (October 5, 1973). "Stage: Subtle 'Streetcar'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  183. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 263; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
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    "Good News Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  186. ^ "'Good News' Closes". The New York Times. January 6, 1975. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  187. ^ Barnes, Clive (March 13, 1975). "A 'Misanthrope' for Modern Times". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  188. ^ Barnes, Clive (November 14, 1975). "'Musical Jubilee'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  189. ^ The Broadway League (November 13, 1975). "A Musical Jubilee – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "A Musical Jubilee (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1975)". Playbill. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  190. ^ "Legitimate: New Management Takes Control Of McKnight Houses". Variety. Vol. 284, no. 9. October 6, 1976. p. 77. ProQuest 1401295438.
  191. ^ Barnes, Clive (March 26, 1976). "'My Fair Lady' Is Restored to Broadway in Fine Form". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  192. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 25, 1976). "My Fair Lady – Broadway Musical – 1976 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "My Fair Lady Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  193. ^ "Higgins Is Moving His Fair Lady to Lunt‐Fontanne". The New York Times. November 16, 1976. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  194. ^ Eder, Richard (February 20, 1978). "Stake: 'On Twentieth Century'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
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    "On the Twentieth Century Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  196. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 263; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 29–30.
  197. ^ Rich, Frank (May 1, 1980). "Theater: 'Barnum,' A Circus Musical; Ring of Tunes". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  198. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 264; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
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    "Barnum Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  200. ^ "'Barnum' Closes Sunday". The New York Times. May 11, 1982. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  201. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 24, 1982). "Rock 'N Roll! The First 5,000 Years – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
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  202. ^ "'Rock, 5,000 Years' Closes". The New York Times. November 2, 1982. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  203. ^ Shewey, Don (May 1, 1983). "How 'My One and Only' Came to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
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  205. ^ a b "$1.5 Million Renovation For St. James Theater". The New York Times. July 11, 1985. p. C20. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 111110430.
  206. ^ a b c Abercrombie, Stanley (September 1987). "St. James Theatre". Interior Design. Vol. 58. p. 286.
  207. ^ Rich, Frank (December 19, 1985). "Theater: 'Jerry's Girls,' a Musical Entertainment". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
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    "Jerry's Girls Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  209. ^ "'Jerry's Girls' to Close". The New York Times. April 17, 1986. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  210. ^ "'42d Street' Will Change Theaters". The New York Times. March 25, 1987. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
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  212. ^ Rothstein, Mervyn (January 9, 1989). "Long, Turbulent Run Of '42d Street' Arrives at Its Finale". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  213. ^ The Broadway League (May 1, 1989). "Largely New York – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "Largely New York (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1989)". Playbill. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  214. ^ "'Largely New York' to Close". The New York Times. August 31, 1989. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  215. ^ Rich, Frank (November 17, 1989). "Review/Theater; 'Gypsy' Is Back on Broadway With a Vengeance". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
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    "Gypsy Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  217. ^ Dunlap, David W. (October 20, 1982). "Landmark Status Sought for Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  218. ^ Shepard, Joan (August 28, 1985). "Is the final curtain near?". New York Daily News. pp. 462, 464. Archived from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021.
  219. ^ Diamonstein-Spielvogel, Barbaralee (2011). The Landmarks of New York. Albany, New York: State University of New York Press. pp. 575–576. ISBN 978-1-4384-3769-9.
  220. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 22, 1987). "The Region; The City Casts Its Theaters In Stone". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 16, 2021.
  221. ^ Purdum, Todd S. (March 12, 1988). "28 Theaters Are Approved as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 30, 2021. Retrieved November 20, 2021.
  222. ^ Dunlap, David W. (June 21, 1988). "Owners File Suit to Revoke Theaters' Landmark Status". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
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  224. ^ Rich, Frank (April 26, 1991). "Review/Theater; 'Garden': The Secret Of Death And Birth". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  225. ^ Sourd, Jacques le (April 26, 1991). "There's nothing sweet growing in this 'Garden'". The Journal News. pp. 23, 33. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
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  227. ^ "Four Shows Close Out Their Broadway Runs". The New York Times. January 5, 1993. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  228. ^ Pareles, Jon (April 27, 1993). "Critic's Notebook; Damping 60's Fire of 'Tommy' for 90's Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  229. ^ Sourd, Jacques le (April 23, 1993). "The pinball wizard comes to Broadway". The Herald Statesman. pp. 57, 63. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
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  231. ^ "'Tommy' to Close". The New York Times. June 12, 1995. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  232. ^ "Artist Neiman uses theater as canvas". UPI. September 18, 1995. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  233. ^ Lambert, Bruce (November 19, 1995). "Accident Brings Curtain Down On Buskers". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  234. ^ Canby, Vincent (April 19, 1996). "Theater Review; Nathan Lane In Sondheim's Roman Romp". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
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  236. ^ "'Forum' to Close Jan. 4". The New York Times. December 11, 1997. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  237. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 13, 1998). "Patti LaBelle on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
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  238. ^ Powers, Ann (January 15, 1998). "Pop Review; A Diva Returns In a Storm Of Gospel And Glitz". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  239. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 27, 1998). "High Society – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
    "High Society Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  240. ^ "'High Society' Closing". The New York Times. August 25, 1998. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  241. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 265.
  242. ^ Gray, Christopher (April 25, 1999). "Streetscapes /Jeffrey Greene and EverGreene Painting Studios; Continuing, and Restoring, a Colorful Tradition". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  243. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 22, 1999). "The Civil War – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
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  244. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 265–266.
  245. ^ McKinley, Jesse (June 9, 1999). "Six Shows Are Closing As Dust Settles From Tonys". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  246. ^ a b c The Broadway League (December 9, 1999). "Swing! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
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  247. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 266.
  248. ^ Pogrebin, Robin (April 21, 2001). "Ticket Sales for 'Producers' Break Broadway Record". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  249. ^ McKinley, Jesse (October 26, 2001). "For the Asking, a $480 Seat". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  250. ^ McKinley, Jesse (November 5, 2004). "Theater Chain on Broadway May Be Sold to Its President". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  251. ^ Smith, Dinitia (February 17, 2005). "A New Owner for 5 Theaters on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 15, 2021. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  252. ^ McKinley, Jesse (October 28, 2005). "Arts, Briefly; Producer at Jujamcyn". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
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  254. ^ a b Robertson, Campbell (February 23, 2007). "Springtime for Hit's End: 'The Producers' to Close". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  255. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 9, 2007). "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
    "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas! Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  256. ^ a b Genzlinger, Neil (November 23, 2007). "Green Menace Is Back, Just in Time for Holidays". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  257. ^ Robertson, Campbell (November 22, 2007). "The Broadway Strike, Now Starring the Grinch". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  258. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 27, 2008). "Gypsy – Broadway Musical – 2008 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
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  259. ^ a b "An Early Exit for 'Gypsy' on Broadway". The New York Times. December 15, 2008. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  260. ^ Cohen, Patricia (September 8, 2009). "A New Force on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  261. ^ Jones, Kenneth (January 22, 2013). "Jordan Roth Is Now Principal Owner of Broadway's Jujamcyn Theaters". Playbill. Archived from the original on April 1, 2019. Retrieved April 1, 2019.
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    "Desire Under the Elms Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  263. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (April 27, 2009). "A High Freudian Love Triangle With Three Sharp Points". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  264. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 29, 2009). "Finian's Rainbow – Broadway Musical – 2009 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
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  265. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (October 29, 2009). "A Pot of Sunny Gold in Those Green Hills". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  266. ^ a b Diamond, Robert (March 15, 2018). "Industry Interview: Inside the Mind of Jujamcyn Theaters' Jordan Roth!". BroadwayWorld.com. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  267. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (April 23, 2015). "Review: 'Something Rotten!,' an Over-the-Top Take on Shakespeare". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
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  269. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 5, 2017). "Present Laughter – Broadway Play – 2017 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
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  270. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (April 6, 2017). "Review: Kevin Kline Serves Ham in Soignée Silk in 'Present Laughter'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  271. ^ Cox, Gordon (June 28, 2016). "Broadway Real Estate: St. James Theater to Expand Stage as Helen Hayes Begins Renovations". Variety. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  272. ^ "Renovations to Begin on Broadway's St. James and Helen Hayes Theatres". TheaterMania. June 28, 2016. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  273. ^ Robbins, Caryn (July 14, 2017). "Photo: Renovations Underway at Broadway's St. James Theater". BroadwayWorld.com. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
  274. ^ "First Look: Historic St. James Theater prepares for 'Frozen' arrival". www.ny1.com. Retrieved January 8, 2022.
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  276. ^ a b Green, Jesse (March 23, 2018). "Review: 'Frozen' Hits Broadway With a Little Magic and Some Icy Patches". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  277. ^ Gelt, Jessica (April 9, 2018). "'Harry Potter' and 'Frozen' break records on Broadway". Los Angeles Times.
  278. ^ "FROZEN Broadway Grosses – 2018". BroadwayWorld.
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  280. ^ Paulson, Michael (May 14, 2020). "Disney Closes 'Frozen' on Broadway, Citing Pandemic". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  281. ^ a b Paulson, Michael (June 28, 2021). "On the Scene: 'Springsteen on Broadway' 🎸". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  282. ^ a b The Broadway League (June 26, 2021). "Springsteen on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
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  283. ^ Paybarah, Azi (July 14, 2021). "Broadway, Awaiting Crowds' Return, Will Get More Wheelchair Access". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  284. ^ "Broadway's Jujamcyn Theaters To Improve Accessibility In Settlement". Deadline. July 14, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  285. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 17, 2021). "American Utopia – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
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  286. ^ The Broadway League (May 14, 1928). "She Stoops to Conquer – Broadway Play – 1928 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
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  287. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 22.
  288. ^ The Broadway League (May 28, 1928). "Diplomacy – Broadway Play – 1928 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "Diplomacy (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1928)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  289. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  290. ^ The Broadway League (September 7, 1931). "The Merry Widow – Broadway Musical – 1931 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "The Merry Widow (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  291. ^ The Broadway League (September 21, 1931). "The Chocolate Soldier – Broadway Musical – 1931 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "The Chocolate Soldier (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  292. ^ The Broadway League (October 5, 1931). "The Geisha – Broadway Musical – 1931 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "The Geisha (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  293. ^ The Broadway League (November 2, 1931). "The Chimes of Normandy – Broadway Musical – 1931 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "The Chimes of Normandy (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  294. ^ The Broadway League (November 16, 1931). "Naughty Marietta – Broadway Musical – 1931 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "Naughty Marietta (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  295. ^ The Broadway League (November 30, 1931). "The Firefly – Broadway Musical – 1931 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "The Firefly (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  296. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  297. ^ The Broadway League (January 11, 1932). "The Gondoliers – Broadway Musical – 1932 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "The Gondoliers (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1932)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  298. ^ The Broadway League (January 27, 1932). "Robin Hood – Broadway Musical – 1932 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "Robin Hood (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1932)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  299. ^ The Broadway League (May 2, 1934). "The Chocolate Soldier – Broadway Musical – 1934 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "The Chocolate Soldier (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1934)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  300. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  301. ^ The Broadway League (September 21, 1936). "Love from a Stranger – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
    "Love from a Stranger (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1936)". Playbill. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  302. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  303. ^ The Broadway League (December 25, 1940). "Pal Joey – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Pal Joey Broadway @ Ethel Barrymore Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  304. ^ The Broadway League (April 24, 1950). "Peter Pan – Broadway Play – 1950 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Peter Pan Broadway @ Imperial Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  305. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  306. ^ The Broadway League (March 16, 1969). "1776 – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "1776 Broadway @ 46th Street Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  307. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  308. ^ The Broadway League (March 12, 1975). "The Misanthrope – Broadway Play – 1975 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "The Misanthrope Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  309. ^ The Broadway League (December 20, 1976). "Music Is – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
    "Music Is (Broadway, St. James Theatre, 1976)". Playbill. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
  310. ^ The Broadway League (May 11, 1977). "Vieux Carré – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Vieux Carré Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  311. ^ The Broadway League (April 8, 1979). "Carmelina – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Carmelina Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  312. ^ The Broadway League (October 7, 1979). "The 1940's Radio Hour – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "The 1940's Radio Hour Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  313. ^ The Broadway League (February 10, 1980). "Filumena – Broadway Play – 1980 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
    "Filumena Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  314. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  315. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 264.
  316. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 231; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 264.
  317. ^ The Broadway League (April 20, 2010). "American Idiot – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
    "American Idiot Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  318. ^ Isherwood, Charles (April 20, 2010). "Stomping Onto Broadway With a Punk Temper Tantrum". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  319. ^ The Broadway League (July 13, 2011). "Hair – Broadway Musical – 2011 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
    "Hair Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  320. ^ Isherwood, Charles (July 14, 2011). "Back When Even War Seemed a Bit Less Scary". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  321. ^ The Broadway League (December 11, 2011). "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
    "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  322. ^ Brantley, Ben (December 12, 2011). "Reincarnation All Over Again". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  323. ^ The Broadway League (April 26, 2012). "Leap of Faith – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
    "Leap of Faith Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  324. ^ Itzkoff, Dave (May 8, 2012). "'Leap of Faith' to Close on Sunday". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  325. ^ The Broadway League (August 1, 2012). "Bring It On The Musical – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
    "Bring It On: The Musical Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  326. ^ Piepenburg, Erik (October 17, 2012). "'Bring It On' to Close at End of December". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  327. ^ The Broadway League (January 29, 2013). "Manilow On Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
    "Manilow on Broadway Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  328. ^ James C. McKinley, James, Jr (January 9, 2013). "Barry Manilow's Return to Broadway Is Extended". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  329. ^ The Broadway League (July 24, 2013). "Let It Be – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
    "Let It Be Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  330. ^ Gates, Anita (July 25, 2013). "Returning to Ensnare Old Rockers and Young". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  331. ^ The Broadway League (April 10, 2014). "Bullets Over Broadway – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
    "Bullets Over Broadway Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  332. ^ Healy, Patrick (July 22, 2014). "'Bullets Over Broadway,' the Musical, to Close Aug. 24". ArtsBeat. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  333. ^ The Broadway League (November 17, 2014). "Side Show – Broadway Musical – 2014 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
    "Side Show Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved January 4, 2022.
  334. ^ Isherwood, Charles (November 18, 2014). "United by Life, Divided by Dreams". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.

Sources