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Dragon Challenge was the world's only dueling steel-inverted roller coaster until it was demolished in 2017. It was located at Universal Orlando's Islands of Adventure theme park in Orlando, Florida.
Dragon Challenge was the world's only dueling steel-inverted roller coaster until it was demolished in 2017. It was located at Universal Orlando's Islands of Adventure theme park in Orlando, Florida.

A steel roller coaster is a roller coaster that is defined by having a track made of steel. Steel coasters have earned immense popularity in the past 50 years throughout the world. Incorporating tubular steel track and polyurethane-coated wheels, the steel roller coasters can provide a taller, smoother, and faster ride with more inversions than a traditional wooden roller coaster.

Arrow Dynamics first introduced the steel roller coaster to feature tubular track to the thrill industry with their creations of the Matterhorn Bobsleds (Disneyland) in 1959 and the Runaway Mine Train (Six Flags Over Texas) in 1966.

As of 2006, the oldest operating steel roller coaster in North America is Little Dipper at Memphis Kiddie Park in Brooklyn, Ohio and has been operating since April 1952. The oldest operating steel rollercoaster in the world is Montaña Suiza at Parque de Atracciones Monte Igueldo (Spain). It has been operating since 1928.

Characteristics

A close-up of the tubular steel tracks. (Galactica at Alton Towers)
A close-up of the tubular steel tracks. (Galactica at Alton Towers)

There are different types of steel coasters, such as flying, inverted, floorless, and suspended.

Notable steel roller coasters

Blue Fire, an inverting launched roller coaster, at Europa-Park, Germany.
Dorney Park and Wildwater Kingdom's Steel Force and Thunderhawk roller coasters, just outside Allentown, Pennsylvania. Steel Force is the tenth tallest roller coaster in the world with a first drop of 205 feet (62 m) and has a top speed of 75 miles per hour (121 km/h).[3]
Dorney Park and Wildwater Kingdom's Steel Force and Thunderhawk roller coasters, just outside Allentown, Pennsylvania. Steel Force is the tenth tallest roller coaster in the world with a first drop of 205 feet (62 m) and has a top speed of 75 miles per hour (121 km/h).[3]
The Smiler a Gerstlauer Infinity Coaster holding the inversion record at Alton Towers.
The Smiler a Gerstlauer Infinity Coaster holding the inversion record at Alton Towers.

Other examples

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Impulse with 540° helix at Knoebels Amusement Resort
Impulse with 540° helix at Knoebels Amusement Resort

References

  1. ^ "Record Holders". rcdb.com. Retrieved 2020-04-18.
  2. ^ "What Is a Hybrid Wooden and Steel Roller Coaster?". tripsavvy.com. Retrieved 2021-01-18.
  3. ^ Marden, Duane. "Steel Force  (Dorney Park & Wildwater Kingdom)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  4. ^ Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Tallest Inverted Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  5. ^ Marden, Duane. "Wicked Twister  (Cedar Point)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  6. ^ "Dayton Daily News".
  7. ^ Marden, Duane. "Roller Coaster Search Results  (Inverted Roller Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  8. ^ a b c d e Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Tallest Steel Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  9. ^ a b Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Fastest Steel Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  10. ^ Hartmann, Adam C. (14 August 2005). "Soaring attraction - Amusement parks gain popularity". The Press-Enterprise. Retrieved 27 June 2011.
  11. ^ Marden, Duane. "Tower of Terror II  (Dreamworld)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  12. ^ Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Fastest Suspended Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  13. ^ Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Tallest Stand-Up Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  14. ^ Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Fastest Stand-Up Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  15. ^ Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Longest Stand-Up Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  16. ^ Marden, Duane. "Roller Coaster Search Results  (Mine Train roller coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  17. ^ Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Inversions)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  18. ^ Fuji-Q Highland (11 May 2011). "Guinness Record Pending Steepest Drop At 121° – A New Roller Coaster" (PDF). Press Release. Japan National Tourism Organisation. Retrieved 14 July 2011.
  19. ^ "Takabisha, World's Steepest Rollercoaster, To Open In Japan (VIDEO)". Huffington Post. 17 June 2011. Retrieved 13 July 2011.
  20. ^ "World's steepest roller-coaster opens in Japan". The Telegraph. 8 July 2011. Archived from the original on 11 July 2011. Retrieved 13 July 2011.
  21. ^ Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Tallest Flying Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  22. ^ Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Fastest Flying Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  23. ^ Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Longest Flying Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  24. ^ Marden, Duane. "Superman: Escape from Krypton  (Six Flags Magic Mountain)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  25. ^ Levine, Arthur (1 May 2018). "Exclusive: Six Flags Fiesta Texas' Wonder Woman coaster review". USA TODAY. USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, LLC. Archived from the original on 27 August 2018. Retrieved 1 September 2018.
  26. ^ Marden, Duane. "Roller Coaster Search Results  (4th Dimension Roller Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  27. ^ Marden, Duane. "Roller Coaster Search Results  (Accelerator Coasters)". Roller Coaster DataBase.