Stern John
CM
SternJohn cropped.jpg
John in 2004
Personal information
Full name Stern John[1]
Date of birth (1976-10-30) 30 October 1976 (age 45)[1]
Place of birth Tunapuna, Trinidad and Tobago
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Position(s) Forward
Club information
Current team
Saint Lucia (manager)
Youth career
1995 Mercer CC
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1996 Malta Carib Alcons 7 (1)
1997 Carolina Dynamo 5 (0)
1997 New Orleans 26 (16)
1998–1999 Columbus Crew 55 (44)
1999–2002 Nottingham Forest 72 (18)
2002–2004 Birmingham City 77 (16)
2004–2007 Coventry City 78 (26)
2005Derby County (loan) 7 (0)
2007 Sunderland 16 (5)
2007–2009 Southampton 47 (19)
2008–2009Bristol City (loan) 24 (2)
2009–2010 Crystal Palace 16 (2)
2009–2010Ipswich Town (loan) 7 (1)
2011–2012 North East Stars
2012 Solihull Moors
2014 WASA FC
2017–2018 Central F.C.
Total 437 (150)
National team
1995–2011[2] Trinidad and Tobago 115 (70)
Teams managed
2017–2020 Central F.C.
2020–2022 Anguilla
2022– Saint Lucia
*Club domestic league appearances and goals, correct as of 11:38, 11 February 2014 (UTC)

Stern John, CM (born 30 October 1976) is a Trinidadian football manager and former player who is currently managing Saint Lucia. He managed Anguilla from 2020 to 2022. He previously played for a number of American and English football clubs that included Columbus Crew, Nottingham Forest, Birmingham City, Coventry City, Derby County, Sunderland, Southampton, Bristol City, Crystal Palace and Ipswich Town.

Club career

Early career in US

John was born in Tunapuna, Trinidad and Tobago[1] and moved to the United States to attend Mercer County Community College in 1995. He joined the Columbus Crew of Major League Soccer (MLS) from the now-defunct New Orleans Riverboat Gamblers of the A-League for the 1998 season. On the recommendation of his older cousin, Columbus Crew defender and Trinidad and Tobago international, Ansil Elcock, John received a try-out with Crew, where he became one of the most prolific scorers in league history. In 1998, John led the league with 26 goals, a record that currently puts him tied for fifth in MLS for goals in one season, and also with 57 points to be named the MLS Scoring Champion. He was named to the MLS Best XI that year as well, and tied for the lead with 18 goals in 1999.

Nottingham Forest

After the 1999 season with Columbus, John was acquired by Nottingham Forest of the English First Division for a fee of £1.5 million. However, eventual financial difficulties at Forest following the team's failed bid at promotion forced John's sale to Birmingham City in February 2002, then pushing for promotion to the Premier League, for the sum of £100,000. John scored 18 goals in 49 starts for Forest.

Birmingham City

At Birmingham, John scored nine goals in 60 Premier League appearances in two full seasons and was effective with his hold up play and also had some memorable moments in the blue shirt of Birmingham, such as his turn and finish away at West Ham in 2002; his last minute equaliser at Villa Park in the Birmingham derby; and his last minute goal away at Millwall which put Birmingham through to the Playoff Final in 2002.[3] He then scored one of the penalties in the play-off final shootout to help them get promoted to the Premier League.[4] Popular with the Birmingham fans for his goals,[citation needed] he nonetheless fell out of favour with management, and was sold to Coventry City on 14 September 2004.

Coventry City

In his first season with Coventry, John finished second in team scoring with 12 goals despite starting in barely half of Coventry's games.

Derby County

At the start of the 2005–06 season, following the signing of James Scowcroft, John found himself outside of manager Micky Adams's first-team plans. As a result, he was loaned to Derby County on 16 September 2005. He rejoined Coventry three months later.

Sunderland

On 29 January 2007, John was transferred to Sunderland for an undisclosed fee. The signing was Sunderland manager Roy Keane's sixth signing of the 2006–07 season January transfer window. He scored his first goals against Southend United in a 4–0 victory on 17 February 2007.

Southampton

On 29 August 2007, John moved to Southampton as part of a deal that took his international teammate Kenwyne Jones in the opposite direction.[5][6]

He scored his first goals with two in a 3–2 win against West Bromwich Albion on 6 October 2007. From then on he scored regularly for "The Saints", with nine goals in his first fifteen appearances, including a second half hat trick against Hull City on 8 December 2007.[7] He finished the 2007–08 season fourth highest scorer in the Championship with 19 goals for Southampton. (He had also scored once for Sunderland in the Premier League prior to his transfer.) Before being sent off for a second bookable offence, John scored two goals, including the match winner, in Southampton's final game of the season against Sheffield United, as the Saints narrowly avoided relegation to League One.

Bristol City

John was loaned to Bristol City in October 2008 until the end of the 2008–09 season.[8] John made his first Bristol City appearance, coming on as a substitute, against Barnsley in a 0–0 draw. John scored his first goal for Bristol City in a 4–1 defeat to Reading at Ashton Gate Stadium on 1 November 2008.

Crystal Palace

On 29 July 2009, John signed for Crystal Palace on a year-long deal after turning down an offer to stay at Southampton.[9] He made his debut on the opening day of the season against Plymouth Argyle, he had to come off after 35 minutes due to an injury. He returned in mid-October, but joined Ipswich Town on a one-month loan at the end of November. He scored his first goal for Ipswich in a 3–2 win over Coventry City on 16 January 2010.[10] Upon his return to Palace he scored his first goal for the club in a 3–1 win at Watford on 30 March 2010.[11] New Palace manager George Burley had hoped to discuss the player's future at the end of the season, but no discussion occurred, and John left the club.[12]

Solihull Moors

In August 2012, after two seasons out of English football, John returned, signing for Solihull Moors.[13] He did not make an appearance in any competition for the club.

WASA FC

John retired and moved back to his native Trinidad and Tobago after his spell at Solihull Moors. He came out of retirement a second time in order to join WASA FC of the National Super League of Trinidad and Tobago in January 2014. He scored on his debut[14]

Central F.C.

John came out of retirement once again in 2016 when he was appointed as player-coach of Central F.C. in the TT Pro League.[15]

International career

John made his international debut for Trinidad and Tobago national team on 15 February 1995 against Finland in a friendly at the Queen's Park Oval, scoring one goal on his debut. He was a vital player for the Soca Warriors and remains the team's all-time leading scorer with 70 goals in 115 caps. He was also the 7th highest international goalscorer at the time of his retirement in 2011. He is also the all-time top CONCACAF goal scorer.

John was instrumental in helping his country qualify for the 2006 FIFA World Cup and played in all three of his country's World Cup group matches at Germany 2006. In Germany, he scored an offside goal. He was also named Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation Player of the Year in 2002. John is currently the second most capped Trinidad and Tobago international behind former teammate Angus Eve. He was the only player to score in 12 consecutive international matches, from 1998 to 1999.

Coaching career

On 9 November 2020, John become the new manager of the Anguilla national team.[16] On 23 May 2022, the Saint Lucia Football Association announced that John had taken over as head coach of the Saint Lucia national team.[17]

Personal life

As a member of the squad that competed at the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany, John was awarded the Chaconia Medal (Gold Class), the second highest state decoration of Trinidad and Tobago.[18]

Career statistics

Club

Appearances and goals by club, season and competition
Club Season League National Cup League Cup Other Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Columbus Crew 1998[19][20] Major League Soccer 27 26 3 1 5[a] 3 35 30
1999[19][21] Major League Soccer 28 18 2 2 5[a] 5 35 25
Total 55 44 5 3 10 8 70 55
Nottingham Forest 1999–2000[22] First Division 17 3 3 0 20 3
2000–01[23] First Division 29 2 1 0 2 1 32 3
2001–02[24][25] First Division 26 13 1 0 1 1 28 14
Total 72 18 5 0 3 2 80 20
Birmingham City 2001–02[24] First Division 15 7 3[b] 1 18 8
2002–03[26] Premier League 30 5 1 1 1 3 32 9
2003–04[27] Premier League 29 4 2 0 1 0 32 4
2004–05[28] Premier League 3 0 3 0
Total 77 16 3 1 2 3 3 1 85 21
Coventry City 2004–05[28] Championship 30 11 2 1 1 0 33 12
2005–06[29] Championship 25 10 3 1 1 0 29 11
2006–07[30] Championship 23 5 2 1 1 0 26 6
Total 78 26 7 3 3 0 88 29
Derby County (loan) 2005–06[29] Championship 7 0 7 0
Sunderland 2006–07[30] Championship 15 4 15 4
2007–08[31] Premier League 1 1 0 0 1 1
Total 16 5 0 0 16 5
Southampton 2007–08[31] Championship 40 19 2 0 42 19
2008–09[32] Championship 7 0 3 1 10 1
Total 47 19 2 0 3 1 52 20
Bristol City (loan) 2008–09[32] Championship 24 2 2 0 26 2
Crystal Palace 2009–10[33] Championship 16 2 0 0 16 2
Ipswich Town (loan) 2009–10[33] Championship 7 1 2 0 9 1
Career total 399 133 26 7 11 6 13 9 449 155
  1. ^ a b Appearances in MLS Cup Playoffs
  2. ^ Appearances in Football League play-offs

International

Source:[34]

Appearances and goals by national team and year
National team Year Apps Goals
Trinidad and Tobago 1995 2 1
1996 8 5
1997 2 1
1998 11 13
1999 8 9
2000 4 0
2001 18 9
2002 2 1
2003 5 5
2004 11 10
2005 20 9
2006 10 3
2008 6 2
2009 3 0
2011 5 1
Total 115 70

International goals

Scores and results list Trinidad and Tobago's goal tally first, score column indicates score after each John goal.[2]
List of international goals scored by Stern John
No. Date Venue Opponent Result Competition
1 15 February 1995 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Finland 2–1 Friendly
2 6 March 1996 Miami, United States  Haiti 2–0 Friendly
3 2 June 1996 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Martinique 2–1 1996 Caribbean Cup[a]
4 23 June 1996 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Dominican Republic 8–0 1998 World Cup qualifier
5
6
7 18 December 1997 Fort-de-France, Martinique  Martinique 2–3 Friendly[a]
8 4 January 1998 Bridgetown, Barbados  Barbados 1–0 Friendly
9 1 February 1998 Oakland, United States  Honduras 3–1 1998 CONCACAF Gold Cup
10
11 22 July 1998 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Antigua and Barbuda 3–2 1998 Caribbean Cup
12 24 July 1998 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Martinique 2–1 1998 Caribbean Cup[a]
13
14 26 July 1998 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Dominica 8–0 1998 Caribbean Cup
15
16
17
18 29 July 1998 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Haiti 4–1 1998 Caribbean Cup
19
20 31 July 1998 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Jamaica 1–2 1998 Caribbean Cup
21 28 March 1999 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Jamaica 2–0 Friendly
22 6 May 1999 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  South Africa 2–0 Friendly
23 3 June 1999 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Jamaica 1–0 1999 Caribbean Cup
24 11 June 1999 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Haiti 6–1 1999 Caribbean Cup
25 13 June 1999 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Cuba 2–1 1999 Caribbean Cup
26 8 September 1999 Miami, United States  Colombia 4–3 Friendly
27
28
29 17 November 1999 Tegucigalpa, Honduras  Honduras 2–3 Friendly
30
31 25 February 2001 Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands  Cayman Islands 3–0 Friendly
32 15 May 2001 Malabar, Trinidad and Tobago  Barbados 5–0 2001 Caribbean Cup
33
34 22 May 2001 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Cuba 2–0 2001 Caribbean Cup
35 16 June 2001 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Honduras 2–4 2002 World Cup qualifier
36 23 June 2001 Prospect, Bermuda  Bermuda 5–0 Friendly
37
38 30 June 2001 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Jamaica 1–2 2002 World Cup qualifier
39 7 October 2001 San Pedro Sula, Honduras  Honduras 1–0 2002 World Cup qualifier
40 20 January 2002 Miami, United States  Costa Rica 1–1 2002 CONCACAF Gold Cup
41 26 March 2003 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Antigua and Barbuda 2–0 2003 CONCACAF Gold Cup qualifier
42 28 March 2003 Tunapuna, Trinidad and Tobago  Guadeloupe 1–0 2003 CONCACAF Gold Cup qualifier[a]
43 30 March 2003 Marabella, Trinidad and Tobago  Cuba 1–3 2003 CONCACAF Gold Cup qualifier
44 3 July 2003 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Venezuela 2–2 Friendly
45
46 31 March 2004 Cairo, Egypt  Egypt 1–2 Friendly
47 23 May 2004 West Bromwich, England  Iraq 2–0 Friendly
48
49 30 May 2004 Edinburgh, Scotland  Scotland 1–4 Friendly
50 13 June 2004 Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic  Dominican Republic 4–0 2006 World Cup qualifier
51
52 4 September 2004 Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis  Saint Kitts and Nevis 2–1 2006 World Cup qualifier
53 8 September 2004 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Mexico 1–3 2006 World Cup qualifier
54 13 June 2004 Marabella, Trinidad and Tobago  Saint Kitts and Nevis 5–1 2006 World Cup qualifier
55
56 3 February 2005 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Haiti 2–1 Friendly
57 25 May 2005 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Bermuda 4–0 Friendly
58 27 May 2005 Marabella, Trinidad and Tobago  Bermuda 1–0 Friendly
59 4 June 2005 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Panama 2–0 2006 World Cup qualifier
60 3 September 2005 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Guatemala 3–2 2006 World Cup qualifier
61
62 8 October 2005 Panama City, Panama  Panama 1–0 2006 World Cup qualifier
63 12 October 2005 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Mexico 2–1 2006 World Cup qualifier
64
65 27 May 2006 Graz, Austria  Wales 1–2 Friendly
66 7 October 2006 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 5–0 Friendly
67
68 15 June 2008 Tunapuna, Trinidad and Tobago  Bermuda 1–2 2010 World Cup qualifier
69 22 June 2008 Hamilton, Bermuda  Bermuda 2–0 2010 World Cup qualifier
70 21 August 2011 Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago  India 3–0 Friendly
  1. ^ a b c d Matches against Martinique and Guadeloupe are not considered full internationals by FIFA.

Honours

Columbus Crew

Birmingham City

Sunderland

Trinidad and Tobago

Individual

Medals

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Stern John". Barry Hugman's Footballers. Retrieved 8 October 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Stern John – Century of International Appearances". The Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation.
  3. ^ Spencer, Nicholas (2 May 2002). "Last-gasp John strike means agony for Millwall". The Daily Telegraph. London. Archived from the original on 5 May 2013.
  4. ^ "Birmingham reach Premiership". BBC. 12 May 2002. Retrieved 29 August 2016.
  5. ^ "Keane pays £6m for Jones". safc.com. 29 August 2007. Retrieved 29 August 2007.
  6. ^ "Breaking transfer news". www.saintsfc.co.uk. 29 August 2007. Retrieved 29 August 2007.
  7. ^ "Saints 4 Hull 0". www.saintsfc.co.uk. Retrieved 7 December 2007.
  8. ^ "John extends Bristol City stint". BBC. 30 December 2008. Retrieved 31 December 2008.
  9. ^ "Eagles swoop for John". Daily Echo. 30 July 2009. Retrieved 30 July 2009.
  10. ^ "Ipswich 3–2 Coventry". BBC Sport. 16 January 2010. Retrieved 17 January 2010.
  11. ^ "Watford 1–3 Crystal Palace". BBC Sport. 30 March 2010. Retrieved 4 May 2010.
  12. ^ Jones, Daniel (9 July 2010). "John's time as an eagle comes to an end". Croydon Advertiser. Archived from the original on 12 November 2017. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  13. ^ "Stern John Makes Comeback With Moors - Pitchero Non-League". 17 August 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  14. ^ Guardian), Andrew Gioannetti (T&T. "Stern salvages point for struggling WASA FC". Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  15. ^ Prescott, Ian (23 September 2017). "'Central' in crisis". Trinidad Express. Port of Spain. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  16. ^ Liburd, Lasana (7 November 2020). "Anguilla snap up Stern, ex-Warriors star will lead minnows into 2022 WCQ campaign". Wired868. Retrieved 25 June 2022.
  17. ^ Andrew, Reginald (25 May 2022). "Stern John – New National Head Coach". The Voice of Saint Lucia. The Voice Publishing Co. Retrieved 25 June 2022.
  18. ^ "Birchall and Bell up for award". BBC Sport. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  19. ^ a b "Stern John". MLS. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  20. ^ "1998 Columbus Crew Match Reports". TheCrew.com. SportsNet Ohio. Archived from the original on 9 February 2002.
    "U.S. Open Cup: Third-Round results (July 7)". Soccer America. 8 July 1998. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  21. ^ "U.S. Open Cup: Third-round results (July 13)". and "U.S. Open Cup: Rochester and Colorado advance to final". Soccer America. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  22. ^ "Games played by Stern John in 1999/2000". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  23. ^ "Games played by Stern John in 2000/2001". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  24. ^ a b "Games played by Stern John in 2001/2002". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  25. ^ Two league appearances not included in Soccerbase source: Rollin, Glenda & Rollin, Jack, eds. (2009). Sky Sports Football Yearbook 2009–2010. Headline. p. 534. ISBN 978-0-7553-1948-0.
  26. ^ "Games played by Stern John in 2002/2003". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  27. ^ "Games played by Stern John in 2003/2004". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
    Four league appearances not included in Soccerbase source: "Stern John". Premier League. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  28. ^ a b "Games played by Stern John in 2004/2005". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  29. ^ a b "Games played by Stern John in 2005/2006". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  30. ^ a b "Games played by Stern John in 2006/2007". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  31. ^ a b "Games played by Stern John in 2007/2008". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  32. ^ a b "Games played by Stern John in 2008/2009". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  33. ^ a b "Games played by Stern John in 2009/2010". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  34. ^ "John, Stern". National Football Teams. Benjamin Strack-Zimmermann. Retrieved 12 June 2022.