Steve Brown
Brown visits the Kentucky Army National Guard in 2010.
East Tennessee State Buccaneers
Position:Secondary coach
Personal information
Born: (1960-03-20) March 20, 1960 (age 62)
Sacramento, California, U.S.
Career information
High school:Sacramento (CA) McClatchy
College:Oregon
NFL Draft:1983 / Round: 3 / Pick: 83
Career history
As a player:
As a coach:
Career highlights and awards
As coach:

As player:

Career NFL statistics
Interceptions:18
Quarterback sacks:5.0
Player stats at NFL.com · PFR

Steven Douglas Brown (born March 20, 1960) is a former American football cornerback who is currently the defensive backs coach for East Tennessee State University. Brown played his entire pro football career with the Houston Oilers from 1983 to 1990. He played college football at Oregon.

Early life

Born and raised in Sacramento, California, Brown graduated from C. K. McClatchy High School in 1978.[1]

College career

Brown played defensive back and kick returner for four seasons on the University of Oregon Ducks football team from 1979 to 1982 under coach Rich Brooks. Brown graduated in 1983 with a degree in English literature and was a member of Kappa Alpha Psi.[2] Brown returned 78 kickoffs for 1,868 yards and a touchdown and 18 punts for 185 yards and a touchdown. He also had 8 interceptions returned for 139 yards and a touchdown.[3][4]

Professional playing career

From 1983 to 1990, Brown played at left cornerback for the Houston Oilers. He had 18 interceptions returned for 264 yards and a touchdown and also had 5 sacks. Brown was also a kick returner from 1983 to 1985, with 36 returns for 857 yards and a touchdown.[1]

NFL Career statistics

Legend
Bold League Leader
Year Team Games Interceptions Fumbles Punt returns Kick returns
GP GS Int Yds TD Lng PD FF Fmb FR Yds TD Ret Yds TD Lng Ret Yds TD Lng
1983 HOU 16 10 1 16 0 16 2 0 0 0 31 795 1 93
1984 HOU 16 16 1 26 0 26 1 1 0 0 3 17 0 17
1985 HOU 15 14 5 41 0 22 1 1 0 0 2 45 0 26
1986 HOU 16 16 2 34 0 38
1987 HOU 10 10 2 45 0 35 1 1 0 0
1988 HOU 14 14 2 48 1 44
1988 HOU 16 16 5 54 0 41
1990 HOU 16 0
Career 119 96 18 264 1 44 5 3 0 0 36 857 1 93

Coaching career

In 1995, Brown reunited with Rich Brooks, his former coach at Oregon, to become a defensive assistant coach for the St. Louis Rams under Brooks. Brown moved to coaching cornerbacks in 1996 and remained cornerbacks coach in 1997 under new coach Dick Vermeil.[4] From 1998 to 2000, including the 1999 Super Bowl XXXIV championship season, Brown coached the defensive backs at St. Louis.[4] Brown coached under Mike Martz in the 2000 season. Among Rams players coached by Brown include Dre' Bly, Kevin Carter, London Fletcher, and Todd Lyght.

In 2003, Brown joined Rich Brooks's staff at the University of Kentucky as defensive backs coach. Brown remained in that position until 2006 and was promoted to defensive coordinator in 2007.[2] Brown remained defensive coordinator in Joker Phillips's inaugural 2010 staff and became co-defensive coordinator and defensive backs coach in 2011.[4] Brown coached in Kentucky teams with three straight bowl wins (2006 Music City Bowl, 2007 Music City Bowl, and 2009 Liberty Bowl) as well as two runner-up bowl appearances (2009 Music City Bowl, 2011 BBVA Compass Bowl).

In 2012, Brown joined Mike Munchak's staff at the Tennessee Titans as assistant secondary coach; he remained at this position under new coach Ken Whisenhunt in 2014.[4] After the 2015 season, Brown left the Tennessee Titans.

He returned to coaching in 2018, accepting the position of defensive backs coach at ETSU.

Personal life

Brown is the older brother of actress Olivia Brown, who co-starred in the 1980s hit show Miami Vice.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b "Steve Brown". pro-football-reference. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "Steve Brown". Kentucky Wildcats. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  3. ^ "Steve Brown". sports-reference.com/cfb. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d e "Steve Brown". Tennessee Titans. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  5. ^ "Bears' defensive tackle Steve McMichael noted whimsically..." Chicago Tribune. October 12, 1986. Retrieved September 15, 2014.