This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.Find sources: "Strike rate" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (February 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Strike rate refers to two different statistics in the sport of cricket. Batting strike rate is a measure of how quickly a batter achieves the primary goal of batting, namely scoring runs, measured in runs per 100 balls; higher is better. Bowling strike rate is a measure of how quickly a bowler achieves the primary goal of bowling, namely taking wickets (i.e. getting batters out)measured in balls per wicket; lower is better. For bowlers, economy rate is a more frequently discussed statistic.

Both strike rates are relatively new statistics, having only been invented and considered of importance after the introduction of One Day International cricket in the 1970s.[citation needed]

Batting strike rate

International batting strike rates as of January 2004
International batting strike rates as of January 2004

Batting strike rate (s/r) is defined for a batter as the average number of runs scored per 100 balls faced. The higher the strike rate, the more effective a batter is at scoring quickly.

In Test cricket, a batter's strike rate is of secondary importance to ability to score runs without getting out. This means a Test batter's most important statistic is generally considered to be batting average, rather than strike rate.

In limited overs cricket, strike rates are of considerably more importance. Since each team only faces a limited number of balls in an innings, the faster a batter scores, the more runs the team will be able to accumulate. Strike rates of over 150 are becoming common in Twenty20 cricket.[1] Strike rate is probably considered by most as the key factor in a batter in one day cricket. Accordingly, the batters with higher strike rates, especially in Twenty20 matches, are more valued than those with a lesser strike rate. Strike rate is also used to compare a batter’s ability to score runs against differing forms of bowling (eg spin bowling, fast bowling), often giving an indication to the bowling team as to how successfully to limit a batter's ability to score.

Highest career strike rate (T20I)

See also: Highest strike rates in ODIs and Highest strike rates in T20Is

Rank Strike rate Runs scored Balls faced Batsman Team T20I career span
1 176.44 704 399 Taranjeet Singhdagger  Romania 2021–2022
2 176.37 1,060 601 Suryakumar Yadav dagger  India 2021–2022
3 175.97 498 283 Zeeshan Kukikheldagger  Hungary 2021–2022
4 174.39 579 332 Saber Zakhildagger  Belgium 2019–2022
5 166.99 511 306 Finn Allendagger  New Zealand 2021–2022
Qualification: 250 balls. Last updated: 23 October 2022[2]

Highest career strike rate (ODI)

Strike rate Runs Balls faced Player Team Period
130.22 1,034 794 Andre Russell  West Indies 2011–present
124.98 3,482 2,786 Glenn Maxwell  Australia 2012–present
119.47 4,245 3,553 Jos Buttler  England 2012–present
117.06 590 504 Lionel Cann  Bermuda 2006–2009
117.00 8,064 6,892 Shaid Afridi  Pakistan 1996–2015
Qualification: 500 balls faced. Last updated: 21 October 2022[3]


Bowling strike rate

Bowling strike rate is defined for a bowler as the average number of balls bowled per wicket taken. The lower the strike rate, the more effective a bowler is at taking wickets quickly.

Although introduced as a statistic complementary to the batting strike rate during the ascension of one-day cricket in the 1980s, bowling strike rates are arguably of more importance in Test cricket than One-day Internationals. This is because the primary goal of a bowler in Test cricket is to take wickets, whereas in a one-day match it is often sufficient to bowl economically - giving away as few runs as possible even if this means taking fewer wickets.

Best career strike rate (ODI and T20I)

See also: Lowest strike rates in ODIs and Lowest strike rates in T20Is

Best career strike rate (Tests)

Retired players
Strike rate Player Country Balls Wickets
34.1 George Lohmann England 3830 112
35.3 Duanne Olivier South Africa 2088 59
37.7 J. J. Ferris Australia / England 2302 61
38.8 Shane Bond New Zealand 3372 87
40.7 Kagiso Rabada South Africa 9908 243

Qualification: 2,000 balls
Last updated: 28 June 2022[4]

Active players
Strike rate Player Country Balls Wickets
33.5 Axar Patel India 1307 39
35.3 Duanne Olivier South Africa 2088 59
38.2 Marco Jansen South Africa 1070 28
40.1 Jayden Seales Cricket West Indies 1446 36
40.7 Kagiso Rabada South Africa 9908 243
40.8 Kuldeep Yadav India 1063 26
41.4 Lungi Ngidi South Africa 1948 47
41.9 Akila Dananjaya Sri Lanka 1385 33
43.9 Kyle Jamieson New Zealand 3162 72
44.3 Kyle Mayers Cricket West Indies 1152 26

Qualification: 1,000 balls
Last updated: 28 June 2022[4]

References

  1. ^ "Records - Twenty20 Internationals - Batting records - Highest career strike rate - ESPN Cricinfo".
  2. ^ "Records–Twenty20 Internationals–Batting records–Highest career strike rate–ESPN Cricinfo". ESPNcricinfo. ESPN. Retrieved 23 October 2022.
  3. ^ "Highest strike rate in One Day International cricket". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 22 June 2019. Retrieved 21 October 2022.
  4. ^ a b "Test matches – Bowling records – Best career strike rate". Cricinfo. ESPN. Retrieved 26 February 2021.