Syktyvkar

Сыктывкар
Other transcription(s)
 • KomiСыктывкар
Flag
Coat of arms
Location of Syktyvkar
Syktyvkar
Syktyvkar
Location of Syktyvkar
Syktyvkar
Syktyvkar
Syktyvkar (European Russia)
Syktyvkar
Syktyvkar
Syktyvkar (Europe)
Coordinates: 61°40′N 50°49′E / 61.667°N 50.817°E / 61.667; 50.817Coordinates: 61°40′N 50°49′E / 61.667°N 50.817°E / 61.667; 50.817
CountryRussia
Federal subjectKomi Republic[1]
Known since16th century
City status since1780
Government
 • MayorNatalia Khozyainova
Area
 • Total152 km2 (59 sq mi)
Elevation
172 m (564 ft)
Population
 • Total235,006
 • Estimate 
(2018)[4]
245,083 (+4.3%)
 • Rank81st in 2010
 • Density1,500/km2 (4,000/sq mi)
 • Subordinated tocity of republic significance of Syktyvkar[1]
 • Capital ofKomi Republic[1]
 • Capital ofcity of republic significance of Syktyvkar[1]
 • Urban okrugSyktyvkar Urban Okrug[5]
 • Capital ofSyktyvkar Urban Okrug[5]
Time zoneUTC+3 (MSK Edit this on Wikidata[6])
Postal code(s)[7]
167000, 167002, 167004, 167005, 167009, 167011, 167014, 167018, 167023, 167026, 167031
Dialing code(s)+7 8212
OKTMO ID87701000001
Websitewww.syktyvkar.komi.com

Syktyvkar (/sɪktɪfˈkɑːr/,[8] Russian: Сыктывка́р, IPA: [sɨktɨfˈkar]; Komi: Сыктывкар) is the capital city of the Komi Republic, Russia.

It was previously known as Ust-Sysolsk (until 1930).

Etymology

The city's current name comes from Syktyv, the Komi name for the Sysola River, plus kar, meaning "city".

Geography

Syktyvkar is located on the Sysola River, which is the origin of its former name Ust-Sysolsk. The city is located near to the point where the Sysola joins the larger Vychegda River, which is itself a branch of the Northern Dvina.

History

It is believed that the city was founded in 1586 as a settlement Ust-Sysola.[9] It was granted city status by Catherine the Great in 1780, and in 1992, it became the capital of the Komi Republic.[10] It has remained the capital since then, although a large influx of ethnic Russians in the 20th century has actually left the Komi a minority there.

The majority of the population were merchants and peasants. The main occupations of the inhabitants were agriculture, cattle-breeding, hunting, fishing, and trade.

By the beginning of the 20th century, the population had grown to 6,000 people. The Tsarist government made the Komi region a place of political exile.

In 1921, Ust-Sysolsk was given the status of administrative center of the newly formed Komi-Zyryan Autonomous Oblast. It was renamed as Syktyvkar, which is Komi for "a town on the Sysola" in 1930, to mark the 150th anniversary of its receipt of city privileges. In 1936, Syktyvkar became the capital of the Komi ASSR.

Administrative and municipal status

Syktyvkar is the capital of the republic.[1] Within the framework of administrative divisions, it is, together with three urban-type settlements (Krasnozatonsky, Sedkyrkeshch, and Verkhnyaya Maksakovka) and three rural localities, incorporated as the city of republic significance of Syktyvkar—an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts.[1] As a municipal division, the city of republic significance of Syktyvkar is incorporated as Syktyvkar Urban Okrug.[5]

Economy

The Sysola, the Vychegda, and the Northern Dvina are navigable and are a major transport route of forestry products from Syktyvkar. Lumber and woodcrafts are the city's largest industries.[citation needed]

Previously Komiinteravia had its head office in Syktyvkar.[11]

Transportation

The city is served by Syktyvkar Airport and Syktyvkar Southwest airfield. The city has a railway station as well. Syktyvkar is the end point of route R176 (Vyatka Highway).

Culture and education

Central street
Central street
Shopping mall "Maxi"
Shopping mall "Maxi"
Central street
Central street

Syktyvkar is the center of the cultural life in the republic. The oldest museum of the Republic of Komi, the National Museum, was founded in 1911. Nowadays, the National Museum is the Literature Memorial Museum of Ivan Kuratov and the museum of Viktor Savin.

The National Gallery was founded in Syktyvkar in 1943. It welcomes exhibitions from different museums of the country.

In 1930 Victor Savin, a poet, playwright, stage manager and actor, founded the Drama theater of the Republic of Komi and the theater still carries his name. Nowadays this theater is one of centers of spiritual and artistic culture of all people who live in the republic. Plays by Nicolai Diakonov, Vasili Lecanov, Alexandre Larev and others are familiar to everybody who knows the history of Komi culture. In 1966 the Drama theater was given the status of Academic theater.

The Theater of Opera and Ballet began its history in 1958.

The National Library numbers 2.5 million volumes, including books in the Russian language, foreign languages and in the Komi language.

Syktyvkar State University was founded in 1972 and has over 3,500 full-time students and 250 faculty members.[12]

The city's folk ensemble "Asya Kya" has been representing Komi Republic on national and international festivals.[13]

One of the oldest Russian progressive rock bands "The Gourishankar" was founded in Syktyvkar in 2001.

Sports

Stroitel[14] which has played many seasons in the highest division of Russian bandy, nowadays called the Russian Bandy Super League, has then played several seasons in the second division, called Russian Bandy Supreme League. At the final tournament of the 2016–17 season, with two Super League tickets held in Syktyvkar, Stroitel won[15] and was thus eligible for promotion. After discussions whether or not to accept,[16] the answer was a yes and the team will play Super League bandy again in the season of 2017–18.[17] Its home venue is Respublikanskiy Stadion.[18] In the 2016/17 season, the club adopted a new logotype (shown to the right in this article) instead of an old one which had a white bear playing bandy.[19]

There is also a youth team called KDYuSSh-1.[20]

Events

The 2017 Bandy Y-19 World Championship was played at Respublikanskiy Stadion.
The 2017 Bandy Y-19 World Championship was played at Respublikanskiy Stadion.

Climate

Syktyvkar experiences a subarctic climate (Köppen climate classification Dfc) with long, cold winters and short, warm summers. Compared with areas at a similar latitude in Siberia, winters are less extreme, but still much longer than summer and bitterly cold by European standards.

Climate data for Syktyvkar, 1981–2010 normals, extremes 1890–present
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 3.8
(38.8)
5.3
(41.5)
13.2
(55.8)
26.7
(80.1)
31.8
(89.2)
35.3
(95.5)
34.4
(93.9)
34.6
(94.3)
27.5
(81.5)
20.4
(68.7)
10.6
(51.1)
5.2
(41.4)
35.3
(95.5)
Average high °C (°F) −10.8
(12.6)
−8.6
(16.5)
−0.5
(31.1)
7.0
(44.6)
14.6
(58.3)
20.6
(69.1)
23.1
(73.6)
18.8
(65.8)
12.3
(54.1)
4.3
(39.7)
−4.3
(24.3)
−8.6
(16.5)
5.7
(42.3)
Daily mean °C (°F) −14.2
(6.4)
−12.4
(9.7)
−5.1
(22.8)
1.8
(35.2)
8.5
(47.3)
14.8
(58.6)
17.5
(63.5)
13.7
(56.7)
8.1
(46.6)
1.7
(35.1)
−6.8
(19.8)
−11.7
(10.9)
1.3
(34.3)
Average low °C (°F) −17.8
(0.0)
−16.1
(3.0)
−9.3
(15.3)
−2.8
(27.0)
3.3
(37.9)
9.4
(48.9)
12.3
(54.1)
9.4
(48.9)
4.7
(40.5)
−0.6
(30.9)
−9.5
(14.9)
−14.9
(5.2)
−2.7
(27.1)
Record low °C (°F) −46.6
(−51.9)
−45.4
(−49.7)
−38.8
(−37.8)
−27.3
(−17.1)
−15.0
(5.0)
−5.0
(23.0)
−0.3
(31.5)
−2.1
(28.2)
−8.6
(16.5)
−29.6
(−21.3)
−43.5
(−46.3)
−46.0
(−50.8)
−46.6
(−51.9)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 41
(1.6)
31
(1.2)
31
(1.2)
33
(1.3)
48
(1.9)
74
(2.9)
74
(2.9)
75
(3.0)
57
(2.2)
59
(2.3)
52
(2.0)
46
(1.8)
620
(24.4)
Average rainy days 4 3 5 13 19 19 19 21 23 19 8 6 159
Average snowy days 28 26 23 14 6 1 0 0.1 3 16 26 28 171
Average relative humidity (%) 83 81 75 67 64 68 73 79 84 86 86 84 78
Mean monthly sunshine hours 20 64 125 185 254 278 278 200 103 49 22 9 1,587
Source 1: Погода и Климат[24]
Source 2: NOAA (sun, 1961–1990)[25]

Twin towns – sister cities

See also: List of twin towns and sister cities in Russia

Syktyvkar is twinned with:[26]

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Law #16-RZ
  2. ^ Сайт администрации МО ГО 'Сыктывкар' — Краткая справка Archived December 24, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Russian Federal State Statistics Service (2011). Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1 [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года [2010 All-Russia Population Census] (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service.
  4. ^ "26. Численность постоянного населения Российской Федерации по муниципальным образованиям на 1 января 2018 года". Federal State Statistics Service. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c Law #11-RZ
  6. ^ "Об исчислении времени". Официальный интернет-портал правовой информации (in Russian). June 3, 2011. Retrieved January 19, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Почта России. Информационно-вычислительный центр ОАСУ РПО. (Russian Post). Поиск объектов почтовой связи (Postal Objects Search) (in Russian)
  8. ^ "Dictionary.com".
  9. ^ "Syktyvkar - Russian cities (Russian)". City of Russia - National selection.
  10. ^ "History in dates - old Syktyvkar (Russian)". Old Syktyvkar.
  11. ^ "Directory: World Airlines. Flight International. 23–29 March 2004. 95. "Sovetskaya Street 69, Skytyvkar, Komi Zone ATD, Russia"
  12. ^ "UNIVERSITY OF SYKTYVKAR". Valdosta State University. Archived from the original on June 2, 2010. Retrieved September 10, 2009.
  13. ^ "Восемь Международных фольклорных фестивалей посетил ансамбль "Асъя кыа" за лето". Комиинформ (in Russian). Retrieved March 10, 2020.
  14. ^ rusbandy.ru
  15. ^ rusbandy.ru
  16. ^ rusbandy.ru
  17. ^ http://www.rusbandy.ru/season/313/ The 2017-18 Super League at rusbandy.ru
  18. ^ The stadium at rusbandy.ru
  19. ^ Image of the new and the old logo at rusbandy.ru
  20. ^ rusbandy.ru
  21. ^ Championship homepage
  22. ^ [1]
  23. ^ https://translate.google.co.uk/translate?hl=en&sl=ru&u=http://www.rusbandy.ru/news/12046/
  24. ^ "Climate Syktyvkar". Pogoda.ru.net. Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  25. ^ "SYKTYVKAR 1961–1990". NOAA. Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  26. ^ "Сыктывкар и его побратимы: что известно о сотрудничестве между городами". komionline.ru (in Russian). Komi Online. May 22, 2019. Retrieved February 4, 2020.

Sources