Tatoid
Tati
تاتی (Tati)
Language codes
ISO 639-3
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.

Tatoid dilalects are dialects of the Tati language spoken in the Iranian provinces of Gilan, Qazvin and Alborz.[1] Tatoid two Tati like ofshoots: Rudbari, Taleghani and Alamuti.[clarification needed] Tatoid includes the Rudbari, Taleghani and Alamuti dialects. According to Stilo, this special status for this recent type is that these two varieties were originally Tatic which, under the intense influences of Caspian and Persian, have lost all their Tatic grammatical structures.[2][3][4]

Alamuti dialect

According to some sources, the people in northern Qazvin (Alamut) speak a dialect of the Tati language.[5][6][7][8][9][10] However, other sources state that the people of Alamut are Mazanderani[11][12] or Gilaks who speak a dialect of the Mazandarani or Gilaki language.[13][14] According to some linguists, the term ‘Tati’ was used by Turkic speakers to refer to non-turkic speakers.[15][16][17] This could explain why some sources refer to the Alamut dialects as Tatoid, while others claim they are Mazandarani or Gilaki. Likely, the ‘Tatoid dialect’ of Alamut is a dialect of Mazanderani[18] or Gilaki, which was labeled as Tati as historically the dialect was considered Mazanderani or Gilaki.[19]

See also

Further reading

References

  1. ^ Yousefi, Saeedreza (2020). "A Critical Review of the Chapter Five of The Languages and Linguistics of Western Asia: An Areal Perspective Entitled: "The Caspian Region and South Azerbaijan: Caspian and Tatic"". A Critical Review of The History of Translation in Iran.
  2. ^ Stilo, Donald L (2018). "The Caspian region and south Azerbaijan: Caspian and Tatic". The Languages and Linguistics of Western Asia. De Gruyter Mouton. doi:10.1515/9783110421682-019. S2CID 189648471.
  3. ^ Stilo, Donald L (2018). "The Caspian region and south Azerbaijan: Caspian and Tatic". The Languages and Linguistics of Western Asia. Germany: De Gruyter Mouton. ISBN 978-3-11-042608-3.
  4. ^ Haig, Geoffrey (2018). The Languages and Linguistics of Western Asia: An Areal Perspective. The world of Linguistics Series. Vol. 6. Germany: De Gruyter Mouton. ISBN 978-3-11-042608-3.
  5. ^ Maciuszak, Kinga (2012). "Some Remarks on the Northern Iranian Dialect of the Alamūt Region". Iran. 33: 111–114. doi:10.2307/4299928. JSTOR 4299928.
  6. ^ مقدمه کتاب «دستور زبان گویش‌های تاتی جنوبی»، پروفسور احسان یارشاطر، لاهه - پاریس ١٩٦٩
  7. ^ گونه‌های زبانی تاتی، دونالد استیلو، ۱۹۸۱
  8. ^ مقاله «بررسی گویش تاتی الموت»، پرویز البرزی ورکی، ۱۳۷۰، دانشگاه تهران
  9. ^ "الموت". Archived from the original on 27 January 2016. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  10. ^ "الموت من". alamouteman.com. Archived from the original on 17 July 2018. Retrieved 2018-07-17.
  11. ^ Jaafari Dehaghi, Mahmoud; Khalilipour, Nazanin; Jaafari Dehaghi, Shima. Iranian Languages and Dialects Past and Present. Tehran. p. 261.
  12. ^ Berjian, Habib. "Decreasing attention to the Mazandarian language in the 20th century". IRNA. Retrieved 19 December 2020.
  13. ^ "روزنامه ولایت قزوین - استان قزوین؛ گنجینه زبان‌های ایرانی".
  14. ^ "Welcome to Encyclopaedia Iranica".
  15. ^ واژۀ تات را مردم ترک زبان به همسایگان غیرترک خود اطلاق می کردند. برخی تات را مترادف تازیک و تاجیک (یعنی فارسی زبان) دانسته ان دانشنامه اسلامید.
  16. ^ نامی که ترک ها به ایرانیان و کسانی که در سرزمین ترکان و یا سرزمین های تحت استیلای ترکان به سر می بردند... اند، فرهنگ عمید
  17. ^ به گروههای مختلف از اقوام غیرترک اطلاق شده:۱ - طبق قول مندرج دردیوان لغات الترک (۲۲۴) این نام نزد همه ترکان در مورد ایرانیان بکار میرفته جلال الدین مولوی هم دراشعار ترکی خود این نام را به ایرانیان اطلاق کرده.
  18. ^ "Considerations about the dialect of Alamut district from the northern dialects of Iran". پرتال جامع علوم انسانی.
  19. ^ "Welcome to Encyclopaedia Iranica".

As of 1132853186 this edit, this article uses content from "A Critical Review of the Chapter Five of The Languages and Linguistics of Western Asia: An Areal Perspective Entitled: “The Caspian Region and South Azerbaijan: Caspian and Tatic”", which is licensed in a way that permits reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License, but not under the GFDL. All relevant terms must be followed.