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A Toyota Vios white taxicab roaming in Metro Manila.
A Toyota Vios white taxicab roaming in Metro Manila.
A yellow Toyota Vios airport taxicab
A yellow Toyota Vios airport taxicab


Taxicabs of the Philippines are one of the modes of transportation in the country. They are regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOTr), the Land Transportation Office (LTO), and the Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTFRB). The taxicabs there vary from models and uses. Most taxicabs have yellow colored license plates, taxi signs, LTFRB Registration number, and taximeter, which is mandatory in every cab.

Regulation

Taxis during the 1990s did not have a color-coding system but in 2001, LTFRB mandated that all taxicabs should be white. Some taxicab companies, however, still use their own colors to distinguish their units while keeping the roof and pillars white. Airport taxis, on the other hand, are yellow. A taxicab has a maximum operational lifespan of 10 years before being pulled out of service.

Each taxicab has its license plate number printed on both quarter panels. The rear of the car has the telephone numbers of the taxicab company and the LTFRB printed to report any reckless driving.

Availability

Most of Metropolitan Areas in the Philippines have taxicabs to serve. The franchises of taxicabs are under the policy of LTFRB and Local Government units around the country. Here is the list of areas where taxicabs are available:

See also

References