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Tenuis dental velar click
k͡ǀ
ᵏǀ
k͡ʇ
ᵏʇ
IPA Number177
Encoding
Entity (decimal)ǀ​ʇ
Unicode (hex)U+01C0 U+0287
Braille
⠯ (braille pattern dots-12346)
⠹ (braille pattern dots-1456)
Audio sample
Tenuis dental uvular click
q͡ǀ
𐞥ǀ
q͡ʇ
𐞥ʇ

The voiceless or more precisely tenuis dental click is a click consonant found primarily among the languages of southern Africa. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ⟨ǀ⟩. The Doke/Beach convention, adopted for a time by the IPA and still preferred by some linguists, is ⟨ʇ⟩.[1][2][3]

Features

Features of the tenuis dental click:

Occurrence

Tenuis dental clicks are found primarily in the various Khoisan language families of southern Africa and in some neighboring Bantu languages.

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
Zulu icici [îːǀíːǀi] = [îːʇíːʇi] 'earring'
Hadza cinambo [ǀinambo] = [ʇinambo] 'firefly'
Khoekhoe ǀgurub [ǀȕɾȕp] = [ʇȕɾȕp] 'dry autumn leaves'

References

  1. ^ Doke, Clement M. (1925). "An outline of the phonetics of the language of the ʗhũ: Bushman of the North-West Kalahari". Bantu Studies. 2: 129–166. doi:10.1080/02561751.1923.9676181.
  2. ^ Doke, Clement M. (1969) [1926]. The phonetics of the Zulu language. Johannesburg: University of the Witwatersrand Press.
  3. ^ Beach, Douglas Martyn (1938). The phonetics of the Hottentot language. London: W. Heffer & Sons.