The honorific prefix "The Most Honourable" is a form of address that is used in several countries. In the United Kingdom, it precedes the name of a marquess or marchioness.[1]

Overview

In Jamaica, Governors-General of Jamaica, as well as their spouses, are entitled to be styled "The Most Honourable" upon receipt of the Jamaican Order of the Nation.[2] Prime Ministers of Jamaica, and their spouses, are also styled this way upon receipt of the Order of the Nation, which is only given to Jamaican Governors-General and Prime Ministers.[2]

In The Bahamas, the style "The Most Honourable" is given to governors-general, prime ministers and recipients of the Bahamian Order of the Nation.[3]

In Barbados, recipients of the Order of Freedom of Barbados receive the style "The Most Honourable".[4]

Certain dignitaries and recipients of honours in Africa are also styled as such. For example, those who make a significant contribution to the Bunyoro-Kitara Kingdom of Uganda, and are granted the Royal Order of the Engabu or the Royal Order of the Omujwaara Kondo, are also entitled to use the hereditary honorific style of "The Most Honourable".

In Malaysia, the Prime Minister of Malaysia and the Chief Ministers of various Malaysian states are accorded the title Yang Amat Berhormat (lit. The Most Honourable in Malay).[citation needed]

In addition, the names of some groups use this prefix, such as "His Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council" in the United Kingdom.

See also

References

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  1. ^ Debretts - Marquess and Marchioness Archived 2014-11-10 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ a b "National Awards of Jamaica", Jamaica Information Service, accessed May 12, 2015.
  3. ^ Thompson, Lindsay (8 October 2018). "Prime Minister received the title -- The Most Honourable -- during National Honours 2018 Ceremony - Government - News". Bahamas Information Services. Retrieved 30 October 2019.
  4. ^ Government of Barbados (28 October 2021). "Official Gazette, October 28, 2021 – Part A – No.125". Government Information Service. Retrieved 8 December 2021.