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The Whistler is a 30-minute U.S. television anthology mystery series, based on the radio series of the same name.

Produced by Lindsley Parsons and CBS Films,[1] 39 episodes were syndicated beginning in 1954,[2] with Signal Oil and Lipton Tea as sponsors. William Forman was both narrator and the voice of "The Whistler", and Dorothy Roberts whistled the theme.[1] The "Backfire" episode starred Lon Chaney Jr.[2] Notable guest stars included Maureen O'Sullivan, Miriam Hopkins, Patric Knowles, Howard Duff, and John Ireland.[citation needed]

Partial list of episodes

Date Title of Episode Star(s)
October 15, 1954 "A Friendly Case of Blackmail" Paul Kelly
Ann Doran.[3]
September 18, 1955 "The Glass Dime" Robert Hutton
Eve Miller
Darlene Fields[4]
February 5, 1956 "The Other Hand" John Howard
Pauline Crell
Ann Seaton[5]
February 12, 1956 "Cup of Gold" Tom Brown
Barbara Woodell
Walter Sande[6]
February 19, 1956 "Cancelled Flight" Barbara Woodell
Walter Sande
Richard Arlen[7]

References

  1. ^ a b Erickson, Hal (1989). Syndicated Television: The First Forty Years, 1947-1987'. McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 73. ISBN 0-7864-1198-8.
  2. ^ a b Erickson, Hal (2014). From Radio to the Big Screen: Hollywood Films Featuring Broadcast Personalities and Programs. McFarland. p. 210. ISBN 978-0-7864-7757-9. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  3. ^ "Whistler Invades TV Scene Tonight". The Los Angeles Times. October 15, 1954. p. 26. Retrieved June 14, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Sunday September 18 (Cont'd)" (PDF). Ross Reports on Television. 7 (38): 6. September 19, 1955. Retrieved June 15, 2020.
  5. ^ "Sunday February 5" (PDF). Ross Reports on Television. 8 (6): 4. February 6, 1956. Retrieved June 15, 2020.
  6. ^ "Sunday February 12 (Cont'd)" (PDF). Ross Reports on Television. 8 (7): 3. February 13, 1956. Retrieved June 15, 2020.
  7. ^ "Sunday, February 19 (Cont'd)" (PDF). Ross Reports on Television. 8 (8): 4. February 20, 1956. Retrieved June 15, 2020.