Thomas M. Fitzpatrick
Coach Thomas M. Fitzpatrick.jpg
Fitzpatrick pictured in the 1921 Utonian, Utah yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1891-01-21)January 21, 1891
DiedJune 24, 1986(1986-06-24) (aged 95)
Aptos, California
Playing career
Football
1911–1912Utah
Basketball
1911–1912Utah
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1919–1924Utah
Basketball
1917–1925Utah
Baseball
1918–1921Utah
Head coaching record
Overall23–17–3 (college football)
42–30 (college basketball)
14–8 (college baseball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 RMC (1922)

Thomas M. Fitzpatrick (January 21, 1891 – June 24, 1986)[1] was an American football and basketball player, coach of football, basketball, and baseball, and football official. He served as the head football coach at the University of Utah from 1919 to 1924, compiling a record of 23–17–3. From 1917 to 1925, he was the coach of the Utah men's basketball team; his teams had a cumulative record of 42–30.[2] Fitzpatrick was also the head baseball coach at Utah from 1918 to 1921, tallying a mark of 14–8.

Fitzpatrick was a native of Montana. After leaving Utah, he moved to Oakland, California to coach high school sports.[3] There he coached football, basketball, and baseball at Roosevelt High School from 1926 to 1944 and at McClymonds High School from 1945 to 1956. He also officiated 12 Rose Bowls, including the 1929 Rose Bowl, famous for Roy Riegels's wrong-way run. Fitzpatrick died on June 24, 1986 at the age of 95. He had been a resident of Aptos, California since 1962.[4]

Head coaching record

College football

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Utah Utes (Rocky Mountain Conference) (1919–1924)
1919 Utah 5–2 3–1 2nd
1920 Utah 1–5–1 1–2–1 5th
1921 Utah 3–2–1 2–1–1 3rd
1922 Utah 7–1 5–0 1st
1923 Utah 4–3 2–3 6th
1924 Utah 3–4–1 2–2–1 7th
Utah: 23–17–3 15–9–3
Total: 23–17–3
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

References

  1. ^ "Thomas Fitzpatrick". Retrieved December 25, 2020.
  2. ^ "Utah Coaching Records". Official Website of Utah Athletics. Retrieved November 2, 2015.
  3. ^ "Who's in the News; Thomas Fitzpatricks wed 62 years". Santa Cruz Sentinel. Santa Cruz, California. June 18, 1975. p. 10. Retrieved November 2, 2015 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  4. ^ "Thomas Fitzpatrick, avid sportsman, dies". Santa Cruz Sentinel. Santa Cruz, California. June 26, 1986. p. A-12. Retrieved November 2, 2015 – via Newspapers.com open access.