A request that this article title be changed to Timeline of the January 6 United States Capitol attack is under discussion. Please do not move this article until the discussion is closed.

The following article is a broad timeline of the course of events surrounding the attack on the United States Capitol on January 6, 2021, by rioters supporting United States President Donald Trump's attempts to overturn his defeat in the 2020 presidential election. Pro-Trump rioters stormed the United States Capitol after assembling on the Ellipse of the Capitol complex for a rally headlined as the "Save America March".[1][2]

At the rally, Donald Trump Jr., Rudy Giuliani, and several Republican members of Congress addressed the crowd, repeating unfounded claims of electoral fraud affecting the 2020 election outcome.[3] In his hour-long speech, President Trump suggested marching towards the Capitol, assuring his audience he would be with them, to demand that Congress "only count the electors who have been lawfully slated", and "patriotically make your voices heard". Towards his conclusion, he said "we fight. We fight like hell. And if you don't fight like hell, you're not going to have a country anymore."[4][5][6]

The demonstrations turned violent when attendees breached multiple police perimeters, assaulted Capitol police officers, and occupied, vandalized,[7][8] and ransacked[9] parts of the building for several hours.[9][10] Four people died over the course of the events: one, rioter Ashli Babbitt, was fatally shot by a Capitol Police officer; two died of heart conditions; another died of an amphetamine intoxication. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, who was physically attacked and pepper sprayed died after suffering two strokes the following day.[11][12][13][14]

All times specified or approximated given in Eastern Time, or UTC-5:00:

Preceding events

2020 Jan-Oct

2020 Nov

2020 Dec

Statistically impossible to have lost the 2020 Election. Big protest in D.C. on January 6th. Be there, will be wild![61][62]

Friday, January 1, 2021

Saturday, January 2, 2021

Sunday, January 3, 2021

Monday, January 4, 2021

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

Attack on the Capitol

At noon, Trump began an over one-hour speech encouraging protesters to march to the U.S. Capitol. At 12:49 p.m., Capitol Police responded to reports of an explosive device, later identified as a pipe bomb. Nineteen minutes before Trump ended his speech, rioters overran the perimeter of the Capitol building.

At 2:44 p.m., a Capitol Police officer inside the Speaker's Lobby adjacent to the House chambers shot and fatally wounded a rioter as she climbed through a broken window of a barricaded door. Minutes later, the Governor of Virginia activated all available assets of the State of Virginia including the Virginia National Guard to aid the U.S. Capitol, although the Department of Defense still had not authorized it. By 3:15 p.m., assets from Virginia began rolling into D.C.

An hour later, at 4:17 p.m, a video of Trump was uploaded to Twitter in which he instructed "you have to go home now". Fifteen minutes later, Secretary Miller authorized the D.C. National Guard to actually deploy.

Wednesday, January 6, 2021

A member of a group of Proud Boys east of the Capitol makes the White power OK gesture at 11:54 a.m.
A member of a group of Proud Boys east of the Capitol makes the White power OK gesture at 11:54 a.m.

12:00 p.m.

Pro-Trump supporters gathering outside the east plaza of the Capitol at 12:09 p.m.
Pro-Trump supporters gathering outside the east plaza of the Capitol at 12:09 p.m.

1:00 p.m.

East side of the Capitol at 2:03 p.m.
East side of the Capitol at 2:03 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

C-SPAN broadcast of the Senate going into recess after rioters infiltrate the Capitol
Floorplan of the first floor of the Senate side of the Capitol. "A" indicates the location of the first breach into the building at 2:11 p.m. "B" indicates the location of a Capitol Police officer in a doorway before retreating up stairs at 2:14 p.m.
Floorplan of the first floor of the Senate side of the Capitol. "A" indicates the location of the first breach into the building at 2:11 p.m. "B" indicates the location of a Capitol Police officer in a doorway before retreating up stairs at 2:14 p.m.
Ceremonial boxes containing the states' Electoral College certificates after being removed from the Senate chamber by Congressional staffers
Ceremonial boxes containing the states' Electoral College certificates after being removed from the Senate chamber by Congressional staffers
West steps of the Capitol at 2:46 p.m.
West steps of the Capitol at 2:46 p.m.

3:00 p.m.

Video posted by Senator Bill Cassidy (R–LA) to Twitter at 3:10 p.m.

4:00 p.m.

I know your pain, I know you're hurt. We had an election that was stolen from us. It was a landslide election and everyone knows it, especially the other side. But you have to go home now. We have to have peace. We have to have law and order. We have to respect our great people in law and order. We don't want anybody hurt. It's a very tough period of time. There's never been a time like this where such a thing happened where they could take it away from all of us — from me, from you, from our country. This was a fraudulent election, but we can't play into the hands of these people. We have to have peace. So go home. We love you. You're very special. You've seen what happens. You see the way others are treated that are so bad and so evil. I know how you feel, but go home, and go home in peace.

Tear gas on the west Capitol steps at 4:20 p.m.
Tear gas on the west Capitol steps at 4:20 p.m.

5:00 p.m.

A police line push rioters away from the western side of the Capitol at 5:46 p.m
A police line push rioters away from the western side of the Capitol at 5:46 p.m

Also

Aftermath

Thursday, January 7, 2021

Friday, January 8, 2021

Saturday, January 9, 2021

Monday, January 11, 2021

Tuesday, January 12, 2021

Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Soldiers with the Virginia National Guard on January 16.
Soldiers with the Virginia National Guard on January 16.

Tuesday, January 19, 2021

Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Tuesday, February 16, 2021

Friday, February 19, 2021

Monday, April 19, 2021

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