Tribune, 1 September 1939
Tribune, 1 September 1939

Tribune was the official newspaper of the Communist Party of Australia. It was published by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Australia from 1939 to 1991. Initially it was subtitled as Tribune: The People's Paper. It was also published as the Qld Guardian, Guardian (Melbourne), Forward (Sydney).[1] It had previously been published as The Australian Communist,[2] (1920-1921) The Communist,[3] (1921-1923) and the Workers' Weekly[4] (1923-1939).

The Tribune for the years 1939–1976 has been digitised, as part of the Australian Newspapers Digitisation Program of the National Library of Australia.[5]

Publication history

The Tribune was the flagship of Australia's left wing newspapers.[6][7]

Two competing papers

Two newspapers claiming to represent the Communist Party of Australia were published 1920–1921:[8]

The Australian Communist was a weekly newspaper published from Sydney, Australia between 24 December 1920 and 29 April 1921. In total, 19 issues of The Australian Communist were published. Tom Glynn served as the editor of The Australian Communist until 25 March 1921. For the last issues C.W. Baker served as the editor.
The International Communist
This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (October 2020)

The Communist

In May 1921 the two publications merged[8] as The Communist.[9] It continued publishing under the new title from 1921 to 1923.

Workers' Weekly

The Communist folded in 1923 to be replaced by Workers' Weekly which became the official organ of the CPA. Workers' Weekly ceased publication in 1939, Tribune becoming the official organ. Both CPA papers reviewed New Theatre productions, including the period 1948–1960 when that theatre was blacklisted by the major newspapers.

Tribune

The Tribune was, on 24 May 1940, banned for publication within Australia on the grounds of weakening the war effort, along with Soviets To-day (Sydney), Communist's Review (Sydney), The Wharfie (Sydney), The Militant (imported), World Peace (Sydney). The Guardian (Melbourne), Workers' Star (Perth), and North Queensland Guardian (Townsville).[10] On 15 June 1941 the Communist Party was banned and hundreds of properties were searched for printing presses and evidence of illegal membership.[11]

On 29 July 1941[12] Tribune returned as a pamphlet, initially printed on rough paper using a manual press, which had been purchased by editor Gould in anticipation of such an action.[13] Searches by Commonwealth police failed to discover its location.[14] The Socialist newspaper Forward (board members included Lance Sharkey, Jim Healy, Tom Wright and Ernie Thornton, with Harry Gould as business manager) acknowledged its communist affiliation in 1942, when it became a partial replacement for the Tribune, and merged with that paper when its legal status was restored.[8]

On 3 June 1943, restrictions on the Communist Party having been lifted, the paper was re-launched as Tribune; The People's Paper, an 8-page publication with a new print series: Volume 1, No. 1, published every Thursday, price 3d.[a][15]

In 1945 T. N. P. "Big Tom" Dougherty, general secretary of the Australian Workers' Union, was awarded £1500 in damages in a libel suit against Tribune[16] in respect of an article which appeared in the issue of 8 February 1945.[17][18]

The paper was declared illegal one more time, briefly, in the early 1950s.[8]

Summary

Publication Commenced
publication
Ceased
publication
The International Socialist 1910 1920
The Australian Communist 1920 1921
The Communist 1921 1923
Workers' Weekly 1923 1939
Tribune 1939 1991

Staff

In 1941 Jack Simpson was manager of the paper. When it became illegal, he moved to Western Australia, where he was jailed.

In 1943 Harry Gould was editor and Adam Ogston the manager.[15]

In 1946 Norman Jeffery and Harry Gould were joint editors.[19]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Three pence; perhaps $2 in today's money.

References

  1. ^ "State Library of New South Wales/Catalogue". library.sl.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 12 April 2016.
  2. ^ "The Australian communist". Catalogue. State Library of New South Wales. Retrieved 19 May 2016.
  3. ^ "The Communist". Catalogue. State Library of New South Wales. Retrieved 19 May 2016.
  4. ^ "The Workers' Weekly". Catalogue. State Library of New South Wales. Retrieved 19 May 2016.
  5. ^ "Tribune (Sydney, NSW: 1939 - 1976)". TROVE. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 12 April 2016.
  6. ^ "The Communist Party Newspaper, Tribune, is 60 years old. Voice of the Left Makes both town Hall and Kremlin". Sydney Morning Herald, p. 5. 22 June 1983. Retrieved 12 April 2016.
  7. ^ Symons, Beverley; Macintyre, Stuart; Wells, Andrew; National Library of Australia (1994), Communism in Australia : a resource bibliography, National Library of Australia, ISBN 978-0-642-10625-4
  8. ^ a b c d "The Communist Press- from the inside". Tribune. No. 2580. New South Wales, Australia. 4 October 1989. p. 6. Retrieved 9 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ Beverley Symons (1994). Communism in Australia: A Resource Bibliography. National Library Australia. p. 107. ISBN 978-0-642-10625-4.
  10. ^ "Communist Papers". The Sydney Morning Herald. No. 31, 951. New South Wales, Australia. 25 May 1940. p. 17. Retrieved 8 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ "They Banned the Tribune". Tribune. No. 29. New South Wales, Australia. 24 May 1941. p. 6. Retrieved 8 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "How Communists Opposed Our War Effort". The Sydney Morning Herald. No. 33, 593. New South Wales, Australia. 23 August 1945. p. 2. Retrieved 8 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  13. ^ "About the Author". Australian Communist Party. Retrieved 9 October 2020.
  14. ^ "Search for Illegal Printing Press". Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate. No. 19, 997. New South Wales, Australia. 11 November 1940. p. 5. Retrieved 8 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  15. ^ a b "Tribune". Tribune. Vol. 1, no. 1. New South Wales, Australia. 3 June 1943. p. 2. Retrieved 9 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  16. ^ "Libel Action Against "Tribune"". The Australian Worker. Vol. 54, no. 50. New South Wales, Australia. 19 December 1945. p. 6. Retrieved 9 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  17. ^ "Vicious Attack On ACTU". Tribune. No. 89. New South Wales, Australia. 8 February 1945. p. 7. Retrieved 9 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  18. ^ "Victorian AWU Hits Fallonites". Tribune. No. 89. New South Wales, Australia. 8 February 1945. p. 7. Retrieved 9 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  19. ^ "Senator Gives List of "Red Leaders"". The Sydney Morning Herald. No. 33, 857. New South Wales, Australia. 28 June 1946. p. 5. Retrieved 8 October 2020 – via National Library of Australia.