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Tsifteteli (Greek: τσιφτετέλι) or Çiftetelli, is a rhythm and dance of Anatolia and the Balkans.[1] In Turkish the word means "double stringed", taken from the violin playing style that is practiced in this kind of music. There are suggestions that the dance existed in ancient Greece, known as the Aristophanic dance Cordax, even though such a thesis is not fully evident. Furthermore, it is historically never spotted in Greece before the Greek-Turkish population exchange of 1923, and no dance in native Greek tradition shows similarities with the specific dance.[2] Nowadays it is to be found not only in Greece and Turkey, but also in the whole of the Southeastern Mediterranean region..[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Belma Kurtişoğlu (2012). "ÇİFTETELLİ ON ARTISTIC AND SOCIAL STAGES" (PDF). 27th SYMPOSIUM ICTM STUDY GROUP ON ETHNOCHOREOLOGY: LIMERICK, IRELAND 2012. Retrieved 29 November 2020.
  2. ^ Tsifteteli - kordax, Hē Lexē: volumes 21-28