Tyler Rogers
San Francisco Giants – No. 71
Pitcher
Born: (1990-12-17) December 17, 1990 (age 30)
Littleton, Colorado
Bats: Right
Throws: Right
MLB debut
August 27, 2019, for the San Francisco Giants
MLB statistics
(through 2021 season)
Win–loss record12–4
Earned run average2.56
Strikeouts98
Saves16
Teams

Tyler Scott Rogers (born December 17, 1990) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball (MLB). He played college baseball for Garden City Community College and Austin Peay State University. Rogers was drafted by the Giants in the 10th round of the 2013 MLB draft. He made his MLB debut in 2019. He led the National League in games pitched in both 2020 and 2021.

Amateur career

Rogers attended Chatfield Senior High School in Littleton, Colorado.[1]

Undrafted out of high school, Rogers attended Garden City Community College in Garden City, Kansas.[2] There, in his sophomore year he was 6–3 with a 2.39 ERA in 34 games with 50 strikeouts in 49 innings. He was a second-team All-Kansas Jayhawk Community College Conference selection.[3]

After two seasons, Rogers transferred to Austin Peay State University where he played college baseball for the Governors.[4] There, as a junior transfer in 2012 he was 4–4 with a 2.25 era and had 52 strikeouts in 59.2 innings, while making an Ohio Valley Conference record-tying 38 appearances and saving 10 games.[3]

Rogers was drafted by the San Francisco Giants in the 10th round, with the 312th overall selection, of the 2013 MLB draft. He signed for a signing bonus of $7,500.[5][6]

Professional career

San Francisco Giants

2014-18

Rogers split his debut season between the Arizona League Giants and the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes, going a combined 1–1 with a 2.30 ERA in 27 innings.[7] He split the 2014 season between the Augusta GreenJackets and the San Jose Giants, pitching to a 4–0 record with a 1.81 ERA in 89+23 innings.[7]

Rogers split the 2015 season between San Jose and the Richmond Flying Squirrels, going 5–2 with a 2.00 ERA in 89+13 innings.[7] He split the 2016 season between Richmond and the Sacramento River Cats, going 2–2 with a 3.27 ERA in 66 innings.[8][7]

He spent the 2017 season with Sacramento, going 4–4 with 2.37 ERA in 76 innings.[9][7] He returned to Sacramento for the 2018 season, going 3–2 with a 2.13 ERA in 67+23 innings.[10][7]

2019

Rogers returned to Sacramento in 2019 season, going 4–2 with a 4.21 ERA and 55 strikeouts over 62 innings for them.[11]

On August 27, 2019, the Giants selected Rogers' contract and promoted him to the major leagues.[12] He made his debut that night versus the Arizona Diamondbacks, pitching a scoreless inning in relief.[13]

Rogers finished the 2019 season going 2–0 with a 1.02 ERA and 16 strikeouts over 17+23 innings for the Giants.[14] In 2019, his four-seam fastball was on average the slowest in major league baseball, at 83.1 mph, as was his sinker, at 82.2 mph.[15]

2020

In 2020, Rogers was 3-3 with 3 saves, 10 holds (tied for 3rd-most in MLB), and a 4.50 ERA in a National League-leading 29 games.[16] He pitched 28 innings, in which he averaged 1.9 walks per 9 innings.[17] Balls hit against him had the second-lowest "barrel" percentage in the NL, at 2.0%.[18] His sinker was again on average the slowest in major league baseball, at 82.4 mph, and his slider was the slowest in major league baseball at 71.4 mph.[19]

2021

In the 2021 regular season, Rogers was 7-1 with 13 saves, 30 holds (3rd-most in MLB), and a 2.22 ERA.[20] He led the National League, for the second year in a row, with 80 games pitched, and pitched 81 innings in which he averaged 1.4 walks per 9 innings.[17] Balls hit against him had the second-slowest exit velocity of those hit against any NL pitcher, at 84.6 mph, and the "barrel" percentage of balls hit against him was the lowest in the major leagues at 2.0%.[21][22] His salary was $583,000.[23] In 2021, his fastball was on average the slowest in major league baseball, at 83.0 mph, as was his sinker for the third season in a row, at 82.8 mph, and his slider for the second season in a row, at 71.9 mph.[24]

Personal life

Tyler Rogers' older identical mirror image twin brother, Taylor, is a pitcher for the Minnesota Twins.[25] The brothers became the 10th set of twins to play in MLB.[26]

References

  1. ^ Kyle Newman (May 15, 2017). "Twin pitchers Taylor and Tyler Rogers are one call-up away from accomplishing a rare MLB feat". The Denver Post. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  2. ^ "Govs add closer Tyler Rogers to 2012 Roster". clarksvilleonline.com. April 25, 2011. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Tyler Rogers - Baseball". Austin Peay State University Athletics.
  4. ^ APSU Sports Information (May 14, 2013). "Austin Peay's Tyler Rogers One Of The Best". Clarksville Sports Network. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  5. ^ "Austin Peay State University Baseball's Tyler Rogers selected in 10th round of Major League Baseball Draft". Clarksville Sports Network. June 7, 2013. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  6. ^ "Tyler Rogers". The Baseball Cube. June 18, 2013. Retrieved November 21, 2019.
  7. ^ a b c d e f "Tyler Rogers BR page". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  8. ^ Richmond Flying Squirrels (May 19, 2016). "Featured Player - Tyler Rogers". MiLB.com. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  9. ^ Gordon Engelhardt (April 11, 2017). "Rogers briefly lived the dream, back to reality". Evansville Courier & Press. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  10. ^ Phill Miller (September 18, 2018). "Amid his hot streak, twin brother is on Taylor Rogers' mind". Star Tribune. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  11. ^ Henry Schulman (August 27, 2019). "Giants promoting top infield prospect Mauricio Dubon, cut Scooter Gennett". The San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  12. ^ Kerry Crowley (August 27, 2019). "Giants cut trade deadline acquisition Scooter Gennett, promote three players". The Mercury News. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  13. ^ Maria Guardado (August 28, 2019). "Rogers debuts soon after twin brother's save". MLB.com. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  14. ^ David Laurila (October 20, 2019). "Sunday Notes: Giants Righty Tyler Rogers is Thriving as a Submarine-Style Sibling". FanGraphs.com. Retrieved October 20, 2019.
  15. ^ Baseball Savant. "Statcast Pitch Arsenals Leaderboard". MLB.com. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  16. ^ "MLB Stats | Baseball Stats". MLB.com.
  17. ^ a b "Tyler Rogers Stats". Baseball-Reference.com.
  18. ^ "National League Leaderboards » 2020 » Pitchers » Statcast | FanGraphs Baseball". www.fangraphs.com.
  19. ^ "National League Leaderboards » 2020 » Pitchers » 17 | FanGraphs Baseball". www.fangraphs.com.
  20. ^ "MLB Stats | Baseball Stats". MLB.com.
  21. ^ "Major League Leaderboards » 2021 » Pitchers » Statcast | FanGraphs Baseball". www.fangraphs.com.
  22. ^ "National League Leaderboards » 2021 » Pitchers » Statcast | FanGraphs Baseball". www.fangraphs.com.
  23. ^ "San Francisco Giants 2021 Salaries Payroll". Spotrac.com.
  24. ^ "National League Leaderboards » 2021 » Pitchers » 17 | FanGraphs Baseball". www.fangraphs.com.
  25. ^ Andrew Baggarly and Dan Hayes (March 14, 2019). "Mirror men: You can't tell identical twins Taylor and Tyler Rogers apart — until you see them throw". The Athletic. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  26. ^ Andrew Baggarly (August 28, 2019). "Tears of joy and a missed bus: Twin brothers Taylor and Tyler Rogers celebrate a long-awaited debut". The Athletic. Retrieved August 28, 2019.