UEFA Euro 2016 Final
Match programme cover
EventUEFA Euro 2016
After extra time
Date10 July 2016 (2016-07-10)
VenueStade de France, Saint-Denis
Man of the MatchPepe (Portugal)
RefereeMark Clattenburg (England)
Attendance75,868
WeatherSunny
28 °C (82 °F)
38% humidity[1]
2012
2020

The UEFA Euro 2016 Final was a football match that took place on 10 July 2016 at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis, France, to determine the winners of UEFA Euro 2016. Portugal defeated the hosts and two-time winners France 1–0 after extra time, with a goal from substitute Eder, to claim its first major tournament title. In doing so, they became the tenth nation to win the UEFA European Championship, 12 years after losing their first final at home in 2004. France became the second host team to lose the final, after Portugal in 2004, and suffered their first defeat at a major tournament hosted in the country since the 1960 European Nations' Cup third-place playoff against Czechoslovakia. This was the fifth European Championship final to end in a draw after 90 minutes of play, and the second whose winners were decided by extra time, after the inaugural final in 1960.

As the winners, Portugal gained entry into their first FIFA Confederations Cup, which was played in Russia in 2017.

Venue

Main article: Stade de France

The Stade de France in Saint-Denis hosted the final.
The Stade de France in Saint-Denis hosted the final.

The final was held at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis, a suburb of Paris. The announcement of the venue was made by UEFA, along with the full tournament schedule, on 25 April 2014, following a meeting held in Paris.[2] The French capital had hosted the finals of two previous European Championships, in 1960 and 1984, both at the Parc des Princes.[3]

A UEFA Category Four stadium, the Stade de France is the sixth-largest stadium in Europe and the largest venue of Euro 2016, with a maximum capacity for the tournament of 80,000. The final was the seventh match played in the stadium at Euro 2016, which included the tournament's opening match between France and Romania.[4]

Background

France had previously played in two European Championship finals, winning against Spain in 1984 on home soil, and via golden goal against Italy in the Netherlands in 2000. Portugal had played in one prior final, losing to Greece in their own country in 2004.[5]

The two teams had previously met 24 times, with their first encounter taking place in 1926 when France won 4–2 in Toulouse. Before the final, France had won 18 of those meetings, Portugal 5, and 1 draw. Portugal's last victory was in a 1975 friendly in France, after which France won all ten of the subsequent meetings. All three of their previous competitive meetings – in the semi-finals of Euro 1984, Euro 2000, and the 2006 FIFA World Cup – had been French victories.[6]

Route to the final

Portugal

After qualifying for Euro 2016 as winners of Group I with seven wins and a defeat in their eight matches, Portugal were drawn in Group F for the finals tournament. Their first group match was against Iceland at the Stade Geoffroy-Guichard in Saint-Étienne on 14 June 2016. Gylfi Sigurðsson had two early chances to put Iceland ahead but both shots were saved by Portugal goalkeeper Rui Patrício, before Nani gave Portugal the lead in the 31st minute after a cross from André Gomes. Five minutes into the second half, Iceland equalised after Birkir Bjarnason scored from a Jóhann Berg Guðmundsson cross that had been missed by Portugal's Vieirinha. Despite having 72% of the possession and 26 shots throughout the match, Portugal were unable to retake the lead and the match ended 1–1.[7][8] Portugal's second opponents were Austria at the Parc des Princes in Paris four days later. The first half ended goalless, but late in the second half, Portugal were awarded a penalty kick when Cristiano Ronaldo, who became his country's most-capped player in that game, was fouled in the Austrian penalty area by defender Martin Hinteregger; however, Ronaldo missed the penalty, striking the foot of the goalpost. He also saw a header disallowed for offside and the match ended 0–0.[9][10] In their final group match, Portugal faced Hungary at the Parc Olympique Lyonnais in Décines-Charpieu on 22 June 2016. Zoltán Gera gave Hungary the lead in the 19th minute with a volley, before Nani struck a low shot past Gábor Király in the Hungary goal following a pass from Ronaldo to level the scores. Balázs Dzsudzsák restored Hungary's lead two minutes after half-time with a deflected shot, only for Ronaldo to make it 2–2 three minutes later. Dzsudzsák scored his second deflected strike in the 55th minute, but Ronaldo equalised once again, this time with a header in the 60th minute. The match ended 3–3, and with a late winning goal from Iceland against Austria, Portugal ended the group stage in third place. Only four of the six third-placed teams qualified; Portugal were ranked third of the six and progressed along with Slovakia, the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.[11][12]

Cristiano Ronaldo (pictured playing against Poland in the quarter-finals) became his country's most capped player during the tournament.
Cristiano Ronaldo (pictured playing against Poland in the quarter-finals) became his country's most capped player during the tournament.

In their first game of the knockout phase, Portugal faced Croatia at the Stade Bollaert-Delelis in Lens on 25 June 2016. The match was described by the BBC Sport's Saj Chowdhury as "a turgid affair", and noted as a game that "won't live long in anyone's memory" by Barry Glendenning in The Guardian.[13][14] Regular time ended goalless without a single shot in the first 24 minutes, a European Championship record. With three minutes of extra time remaining, Ronaldo's shot was kept out by Danijel Subašić, the Croatian goalkeeper, but Ricardo Quaresma headed in the rebound from close range to give Portugal a 1–0 victory.[13][15] Portugal's quarter-final opponents, at the Stade Vélodrome in Marseille on 30 June 2016, were Poland, who took an early lead when Kamil Grosicki's cross was struck into the Portugal goal by Robert Lewandowski within the opening two minutes. It was the second-fastest goal ever scored in the history of the tournament and the Polish striker's first goal in more than 10 hours of football. With 17 minutes of the first half remaining, Renato Sanches played a one-two with Nani and struck a shot that deflected off Grzegorz Krychowiak into the Poland goal to level the scores at 1–1. The second half of the match was goalless, as were the two halves of extra time, so the match went to a penalty shoot-out. Ronaldo, Sanches and João Moutinho scored their penalties for Portugal, while Lewandowski, Arkadiusz Milik and Kamil Glik replied for Poland to make it 3–3. Nani then put Portugal ahead before Jakub Błaszczykowski's strike was saved by Rui Patrício. Quaresma scored Portugal's fifth penalty to seal the win and progression to the semi-finals.[16][17] The semi-finals saw Portugal return to the Parc Olympique Lyonnais in Décines-Charpieu on 6 July 2016 to face Wales, who were participating in their first major tournament since the 1958 FIFA World Cup. After a goalless first half, Portugal took the lead five minutes after the interval, when Ronaldo headed past Wayne Hennessey, the Wales goalkeeper, following a short corner. Three minutes later, Nani diverted a long-range shot from Ronaldo past Hennessey to give Portugal a 2–0 victory and saw them reach their first UEFA European Championship final.[18][19]

France

France were drawn in Group A for Euro 2016 and in their first group match they faced Romania at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis on 10 June 2016. Antoine Griezmann struck the Romania goalpost with a header in the first half which ended goalless. Thirteen minutes into the second half, France took the lead when Olivier Giroud headed in Dimitri Payet's cross. Seven minutes later, Patrice Evra fouled Romania's Nicolae Stanciu in the France penalty area and Bogdan Stancu scored from the resulting penalty kick to equalise. With a minute of the match remaining, Payet struck the ball from around 20 yards (18 m) to score and give France a 2–1 victory.[20][21] France's next opposition were Albania who they played five days later at the Stade Vélodrome in Marseille. In a match which saw some stout defending by Albania, Ledian Memushaj came close to scoring for Albania but his shot hit the post. France scored in the last minute with the game's first shot on target when Griezmann headed in Adil Rami's cross. Six minutes into stoppage time and with the final kick of the match, Payet scored and France won 2–0.[22][23] In their final Group A match, France's opponents were Switzerland at the Stade Pierre-Mauroy in Villeneuve-d'Ascq on 19 June 2016. Paul Pogba hit the frame of Switzerland's goal twice while Payet also hit the crossbar for France. Bacary Sagna appeared to have fouled Switzerland's Blerim Džemaili in stoppage time but no penalty was awarded, and the match ended 0–0. France ended as Group A winners and progressed to the last sixteen.[24][25]

In the first knockout round, France faced the Republic of Ireland at the Parc Olympique Lyonnais on 26 June 2016. After two minutes, Pogba fouled Shane Long in the France penalty area and Robbie Brady scored the resulting penalty to give the Republic of Ireland a 1–0 lead. Griezmann scored the equaliser with a header for France twelve minutes after half-time before scoring his second four minutes later to make it 2–1. Shane Duffy was shown a red card in the 66th minute for a professional foul on Griezmann and although France won the match 2–1, both Rami and N'Golo Kanté were unavailable in the next round having been booked.[26][27] France's quarterfinal opponents were Iceland who had knocked out England in the previous round. Giroud put France into the lead after twelve minutes with a low shot before Pogba doubled his side's advantage with a header seven minutes later. Payet scored in the 42nd minute with a low shot from around 30 yards (27 m) to make it 3–0 before Griezmann increased the lead further with a lob over Hannes Þór Halldórsson, the Iceland goalkeeper, just before half time. Kolbeinn Sigþórsson scored for Iceland eleven minutes after the interval before Giroud made it 5–1 with a header from a free kick. Bjarnason scored a headed goal with six minutes of the match remaining, but that proved to be the final goal as the game ended 5–2.[28][29] In the semi-final, France faced Germany at the Stade Vélodrome in Marseille on 7 July 2016. Two minutes into stoppage time in the first half, Bastian Schweinsteiger was adjudged to have handled the ball when he challenged Evra, and Griezmann scored the resulting penalty to give France a 1–0 lead at half-time. With 18 minutes of the match remaining, Manuel Neuer failed to clear Pogba's cross and Griezmann converted from close range. Joshua Kimmich's strike hit the frame of the France goal before Lloris saved his header, and the match ended 2–0 with France securing their first victory over Germany in a major tournament since 1958 and passage to the final.[30][31]

Summary

Portugal Round France
Opponent Result Group stage Opponent Result
 Iceland 1–1 Match 1  Romania 2–1
 Austria 0–0 Match 2  Albania 2–0
 Hungary 3–3 Match 3   Switzerland 0–0
Group F third-place finisher
Pos Team Pld Pts
1  Hungary 3 5
2  Iceland 3 5
3  Portugal 3 3
4  Austria 3 1
Source: UEFA
Final standings Group A winner
Pos Team Pld Pts
1  France (H) 3 7
2   Switzerland 3 5
3  Albania 3 3
4  Romania 3 1
Source: UEFA
(H) Host
Opponent Result Knockout phase Opponent Result
 Croatia 1–0 (a.e.t.) Round of 16  Republic of Ireland 2–1
 Poland 1–1 (a.e.t.) (5–3 p) Quarter-finals  Iceland 5–2
 Wales 2–0 Semi-finals  Germany 2–0

Pre-match

Match ball

The official match ball for the knockout phase and final was the Adidas Fracas, provided by German sports equipment company Adidas. The ball was announced during the tournament, and was official launched on 20 June. This was the first time a match ball was not used exclusively for the final, and the first time multiple balls were used throughout the tournament (excluding the final).[32]

Stadium

Before the match started, the stadium was invaded by silver Y moths, which caused some irritation to the players, staff and coaches. Workers at the stadium had left the lights switched on the day before the match which attracted huge swaths of insects. The players and coaches of each team during the warm-up tried swatting the moths, and ground staff used brushes to clean moths from the walls, ground and other areas.[33][34]

Officials

Mark Clattenburg was the final's referee.
Mark Clattenburg was the final's referee.

On 8 July 2016, the UEFA Referees Committee announced the officiating team, led by 41-year-old English referee Mark Clattenburg of The Football Association. His compatriots Simon Beck and Jake Collin were chosen as assistant referees, and fellow Englishmen Anthony Taylor and Andre Marriner the additional assistants. Hungarian Viktor Kassai was chosen as the fourth official, with his fellow countryman György Ring as the reserve assistant. Clattenburg became the second official to officiate both a UEFA Champions League final and European Championship final in the same season, after Pedro Proença in 2012. This made it a hat-trick of cup finals for Clattenburg, after the 2016 FA Cup Final and the aforementioned Champions League final, all within a seven-week span. In addition, Clattenburg, FIFA listed since 2007 and a UEFA Elite referee, has officiated the 2012 Olympics gold medal match and the 2014 UEFA Super Cup. Domestically, he also officiated the 2012 Football League Cup Final and the 2013 FA Community Shield. He is the first English European Championship final referee since Arthur Ellis in 1960 and Arthur Holland in 1964, the first two European Championship finals. The match was Clattenburg's fourth appointment at Euro 2016.[35]

Violence

In the hours before the final, there were clashes between fans trying to access the Eiffel Tower fan zone and police attempting to prevent overcrowding.[36] In addition, police carried out a controlled explosion on a package left near the stadium complex, while fans set litter bins alight. The disruption was under control by the second half, but after the match, fights broke out between fans outside the stadium. Police advised people not to travel to the Eiffel Tower or the Champs-Élysées as the area was not safe.[37]

Closing ceremony

Prior to the start of the match, at 8:45 p.m., the closing ceremony was held. It featured 600 dancers and a live rendition of "Seven Nation Army" by various musicians including members of the Paris Fire Brigade, the French Republican Guard, and the Choir of Radio France, before French DJ David Guetta and Swedish singer Zara Larsson performed the official tournament song "This One's for You".[38]

Teams

France's starting line-up was unchanged from the semi-final, while Portugal brought back Pepe and William Carvalho, who missed the semi-final through injury and suspension respectively, for Bruno Alves and Danilo. France adopted a 4–2–3–1 formation while Portugal played as a 4–1–3–2.[19]

Match

Summary

Ricardo Quaresma takes a shot at goal during the match.
Ricardo Quaresma takes a shot at goal during the match.

France started the match trying to impose an uptempo rhythm whereas Portugal preferred a more controlled pace. There were very few goalscoring opportunities in the first half, with the exceptions being an over-the-bar volley from Nani in the 4th minute, a header from Griezmann in the 10th and a low strike by Sissoko in the 34th, these last two both saved by Portugal's Rui Patrício.[39] France had more possession (55% to 45% at halftime, 53% to 47% in the end of regulation) and goal attempts as the match progressed.[40][41] In the eighth minute Portugal's captain and all-time leading scorer Cristiano Ronaldo suffered an injury to the knee from a challenge by Dimitri Payet, not judged as a foul by referee Mark Clattenburg. Ronaldo attempted to play on but fell down twice before finally going down a third time and was substituted for Ricardo Quaresma in the 25th minute.[42][43] Sports Illustrated remarked that France missed opportunities in the 10th, 34th, 66th, and 84th minutes,[41] while the UEFA website mentioned that France continued to probe without managing to obtain clear chances.[39]

Portugal used their remaining two substitutions in the second half, bringing on João Moutinho for Adrien Silva and Eder for Renato Sanches, while France brought on Kingsley Coman for Dimitri Payet and André-Pierre Gignac for Olivier Giroud. The home side's main chances occurred in the second half, when Griezmann was left unmarked 6 metres from the goal heading over the crossbar, and when Gignac hit the post in the last minute of normal time after his shot beat Rui Patrício. Portugal's best chances at goals came in extra time: a header from Eder was saved by Hugo Lloris and Raphaël Guerreiro hit the crossbar from a free kick given by the referee from an alleged handball by Laurent Koscielny, though the replays showed the ball touching Eder's hand instead while being pressed by Koscielny from behind.[44][45][46] Eder ended up scoring what would turn out to be the winning goal in the 109th minute. João Moutinho recovered the ball in the midfield directly from a Bacary Sagna's throw-in and, after a ball passing sequence which involved also William Carvalho and Quaresma, passed it to the forward. Holding off Koscielny, Eder cut inside and struck the ball low to the keeper's right from approximately 25 yards (23 m).[41] ESPN said that the strike was "brilliantly taken" and "one that deserved to win any final".[40] France immediately brought on Anthony Martial, but to no avail, as Portugal went on to win their first major trophy.[46][47]

Details

Portugal 1–0 (a.e.t.) France
Report
Portugal[1]
France[1]
GK 1 Rui Patrício Yellow card 120+3'
RB 21 Cédric Yellow card 34'
CB 3 Pepe
CB 4 José Fonte Yellow card 119'
LB 5 Raphaël Guerreiro Yellow card 95'
DM 14 William Carvalho Yellow card 98'
RW 16 Renato Sanches Substituted off 79'
AM 23 Adrien Silva Substituted off 66'
LW 10 João Mário Yellow card 62'
CF 17 Nani
CF 7 Cristiano Ronaldo (c) Substituted off 25'
Substitutions:
FW 20 Ricardo Quaresma Substituted in 25'
MF 8 João Moutinho Substituted in 66'
FW 9 Eder Substituted in 79'
Manager:
Fernando Santos
GK 1 Hugo Lloris (c)
RB 19 Bacary Sagna
CB 21 Laurent Koscielny Yellow card 107'
CB 22 Samuel Umtiti Yellow card 80'
LB 3 Patrice Evra
RM 18 Moussa Sissoko Substituted off 110'
CM 15 Paul Pogba Yellow card 115'
CM 14 Blaise Matuidi Yellow card 97'
LM 8 Dimitri Payet Substituted off 58'
SS 7 Antoine Griezmann
CF 9 Olivier Giroud Substituted off 78'
Substitutions:
MF 20 Kingsley Coman Substituted in 58'
FW 10 André-Pierre Gignac Substituted in 78'
FW 11 Anthony Martial Substituted in 110'
Manager:
Didier Deschamps

Man of the Match:
Pepe (Portugal)[49]

Assistant referees:[35]
Simon Beck (England)
Jake Collin (England)
Fourth official:
Viktor Kassai (Hungary)
Additional assistant referees:
Anthony Taylor (England)
Andre Marriner (England)
Reserve assistant referee:
György Ring (Hungary)

Match rules[50]

Statistics

Post-match

Portugal's Pepe was named man of the match.[49] The match was Portugal's first competitive win against France, first overall win against France since 1975, and gave Portugal their first major trophy.[6][33] The win also qualified Portugal for the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup in Russia, marking their first appearance in the competition, and the first time that three countries from the same confederation participated in the competition (hosts Russia, world champions Germany, and European champions Portugal).[52]

Signed from Benfica a few weeks before the tournament, Bayern Munich's Renato Sanches became the youngest player to win the Euro at 18 years and 328 days. Had France won the final, it also would have been a Bayern player to have this new record, Kingsley Coman (20 years, 27 days). Sanches was later named the Young Player of the Tournament by UEFA.[53]

References

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