Map of the Ukrainian diaspora in the world.
  Ukraine
  + 1,000,000
  + 100,000
  + 10,000
  + 1,000

The Ukrainian diaspora comprises Ukrainians and their descendants who live outside Ukraine around the world, especially those who maintain some kind of connection to the land of their ancestors and maintain their feeling of Ukrainian national identity within their own local community.[1] The Ukrainian diaspora is found throughout numerous regions worldwide including other post-Soviet states as well as in Canada and other countries such as Poland,[2] the United States,[3] the UK[4][5] and Brazil.[6]

Distribution

Ukrainians and diaspora worldwide
Country Population %
 Argentina 1,000,000 2
 Belarus 159,656 0.3
 Brazil 600,000 1.3
 Canada 1,359,655 2.9
 Czech Republic 650,000 1.5
 Germany 272,000 0.6
 Italy 234,354 0.5
 France 35,000 0.1
 Kazakhstan 338,022 0.7
 Moldova 442,475 0.9
 Poland 1,200,000 2.5
 Portugal 45,051 0.1
 Romania 51,703 0.1
 Russia 3,269,992 6.9
 Spain 112,034 0.2
 Ukraine 37,541,693 79.3
 United States 1,028,492 2.2
 Estonia 23,665 1.8

The Ukrainian diaspora is found throughout numerous countries worldwide. It is particularly concentrated in other post-Soviet states (Belarus, Kazakhstan, Moldova, and Russia), Central Europe (the Czech Republic, Germany, and Poland), North America (Canada and the United States), and South America (Argentina and Brazil).

History

1608 to 1880

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After the loss suffered by the Ukrainian-Swedish Alliance under Ivan Mazepa in the Battle of Poltava in 1709, some political emigrants, primarily Cossacks, settled in Turkey and in Western Europe.

In 1775, after the fall of the Zaporozhian Sich to the Russian Empire, some more Cossacks emigrated to Dobruja in the Ottoman Empire (now in Romania), while others settled in Volga and Ural regions of the Russian Empire.

In the second half of the 18th century, Ukrainians from the Transcarpathian Region formed agricultural settlements in the Kingdom of Hungary, primarily in the Bačka and Syrmia regions. Both are now located in the Vojvodina Region of the Republic of Serbia.

In time, Ukrainian settlements emerged in the major European capitals, including Vienna, Budapest, Rome and Warsaw.

1880–1920

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Share of Ukrainians by poviats of the Russian Empire, districts and counties of Austria-Hungary at the end of the 19th century
Ukrainians in Austro-Hungarian Monarchy 1890, modern Prnjavor, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Green Ukraine – Ukrainian historical name of the land in the Russian Far East area.

In 1880, the Ukrainian diaspora consisted of approximately 1.2 million people, which represented approximately 4.6% of all Ukrainians, and was distributed as follows:

In the last quarter of the 19th century due to the agrarian resettlement, a massive emigration of Ukrainians from Austro-Hungary to the Americas and from the Russian Empire to the Urals and Asia (Siberia and Kazakhstan) occurred.

A secondary movement was the emigration under the auspices of the Austro-Hungarian government of 10,000 Ukrainians from Galicia to Bosnia.

Furthermore, due to Russian agitation, 15,000 Ukrainians left Galicia and Bukovina and settled in Russia. Most of these settlers later returned.

Finally in the Russian Empire, some Ukrainians from the Chełm and Podlaskie regions, as well as most of the Jews, emigrated to the Americas.

Some of those who left their homeland returned. For example, from the 393,000 Ukrainians who emigrated to the United States, 70,000 returned.

Most of the emigrants to the US worked in the construction and mining industries. Many worked in the US on a temporary basis to earn remittances.

In the 1890s, Ukrainian agricultural settlers emigrated first to Brazil and Argentina. However, the writings of Galician professor and nationalist Dr Joseph Oleskiw were influential in redirecting that flow to Canada. He visited an already-established Ukrainian block settlement, which had been founded by Iwan Pylypiw, and met with Canadian immigration officials. His two pamphlets on the subject praised the United States as a place for wage labour, but stated that Canada was the best place for agricultural settlers to obtain free land. By contrast he was fiercely critical of the treatment Ukrainian settlers had received in South America. After his writings, the slow trickle of Ukrainians to Canada greatly increased.

Before the start of the First World War, almost 500,000 Ukrainians emigrated to the Americas. This can be broken down by country as follows:

In 1914, the Ukrainian diaspora in the Americas numbered about 700,000-750,000 people:

Most of the emigrants to the Americas belonged to the Greek Catholic Church. This led to the creation of Greek Catholic bishops in Canada and the US. The need for solidarity led to the creation of Ukrainian religious, political, and social organisations. These new Ukrainian organisations maintained links with the homeland, from which books, media, priests, cultural figures, and new ideas arrived. Furthermore, local influence, as well as influence from their homeland, led to the process of a national re-awakening. At times, the diaspora was ahead of their time in this re-awakening.

Emigrants from the Transcarpathian and Lemko regions created their own organisations and had their own separate Greek Catholic church hierarchy (the Ruthenian Catholic Church). These emigrants are often considered to be Rusyns or Ruthenians and are considered by some to be distinct from other Ukrainians. However, in Argentina and Brazil, immigrants from Transcarpathia and the Lemko Region did identify themselves as Ukrainians.

The majority of the Ukrainian diaspora in the Americas focused on obtaining independence and convincing outside powers to join its war against the Soviets. The two nationalist governments which existed simultaneously; The Ukrainian People’s Republic, and The West Ukrainian People’s Republic (whose more progressive government was exiled by the former) both sent delegates to the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. An interesting note is the role the Ruthenians played to convince the American government about the inclusion of the Transcarpathian region into the Czechoslovak Republic in 1919.

In contrast, the Ukrainian diaspora in the Russian Empire, and especially in Asia, was primarily agrarian. After 1860, the diaspora was primarily located in the Volga and Ural Regions, while in the last quarter of that century, due to a lack of space for settlement, the diaspora expanded into Western Siberia, Turkestan, the Far East, and even into the Zeleny Klyn. In the 1897 census there were 1,560,000 Ukrainians divided as follows:

In the next few decades, Ukrainian emigration to Asia increased (almost 1.5 million Ukrainians emigrated), leading to almost 2 million Ukrainians in the Asian part of the Russian Empire by 1914. Consequently, the Russian Empire had approximately 3.4 million Ukrainians. Most of this population was assimilated due to a lack of national awareness and closeness with the local Russian population, especially in religion.

Unlike the emigrants from Austro-Hungary, the Ukrainian emigrants in the Russian Empire did not create their own organisations nor were there many interactions with their homeland. The revolution of 1917 allowed the creation of Ukrainian organisations, which were linked with the national and political rebirth in Ukraine.

1920–1945

First major political emigration

The First World War and the Russian Civil War led to the first massive political emigration, which strengthened the existing Ukrainian communities by infusing them with members from various political, scientific, and cultural backgrounds. Furthermore, some of these new emigrants formed Ukrainian communities in Western and Central Europe. Thus, new communities were created in Czechoslovakia, Germany, Poland, France, Belgium, Austria, Romania, and Yugoslavia. The largest was in Prague, which was considered one of the centres of Ukrainian culture and political life (after Lviv and Kraków).

This group of emigrants created many different organisations and movements associated with corresponding groups in the battle for independence. A few Ukrainian universities were founded. Furthermore, many of these organisations were associated with the exiled Ukrainian government, the Ukrainian People's Republic.

During the 1920s, the new diaspora maintained links with now-Soviet Ukraine. A Sovietophile movement appeared, whereby former opponents of the Bolsheviks began to argue that Ukrainians should support Soviet Ukraine. Some argued that they should do so because the Soviet republics were the leaders of international revolution, while others claimed that the Bolsheviks' social and national policies benefited Ukraine. This movement included Mykhailo Hrushevskyi, Volodymyr Vynnychenko and Yevhen Petrushevych. Many émigrés, including Hrushevskyi, returned and helped the Bolsheviks implement their policy of Ukrainianisation. However, the abandonment of Ukrainianisation, the return to collectivisation, and the man-made famine of 1932–33 ended Ukrainianisation.[7] Most of the links were broken, with the exception of some Sovietophile organisations in Canada and the United States.[8]

On the other hand, the Canadian and American diaspora maintained links with the Ukrainian community in Galicia and the Transcarpathian Region.

The political emigration decreased in the mid-1920s due to a return to Soviet Ukraine and a decline in students studying at the Ukrainian universities established outside of Ukraine.

Economic emigration

In 1920 and 1921, many Ukrainians left Western Ukraine to settle in the Americas and Western Europe. Most of the emigrates settled in Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Paraguay, France, the UK and Belgium. The economic crisis of the early 1930s stopped most of this emigration. The emigration picked up again later in the decade. The number of emigrants can be approximated as:

Furthermore, many Ukrainians left the Ukrainian SSR and settled in Asia due to political and economic factors, primarily collectivisation and the famine of the 1930s.

Size

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The Ukrainian diaspora, outside of the Soviet Union, was 1.7-1.8 million people:

Number and share of Ukrainians in the population of the regions of the RSFSR (1926 census)

According to the Soviet census of 1926, there were 3,450,000 Ukrainians living outside of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, divided as follows:

In Siberia, the vast majority of the Ukrainians lived in the Central Asian region and the Zeleny Klyn. On 1 January 1933, there were about 4.5 million Ukrainians (larger than the official figures) in the Soviet Union outside of the Ukrainian SSR, while in America there were 1.1-1.2 million Ukrainians.

In 1931, the Ukrainian diaspora can be counted as follows:

Ukrainian Diaspora in 1931
Country Number (thousands)
Soviet Republics 9,020
Poland 6,876
Romania 1,200
USA 750
Czechoslovakia 650
Canada 400
Rest 368.5
In all 19,264.5

In the Ukrainian SSR, there were 25,300,278 Ukrainians.

1945–1991

Outside the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe

After the Second World War, the Ukrainian diaspora increased due to a second wave of displaced persons. The 250,000 Ukrainians at first settled in Germany and Austria. In the mid-to-late 1940s and early 1950s, these Ukrainians were resettled in many different countries creating new Ukrainian settlements in Australia, Venezuela, and for a time in Tunisia (Ben-Metir), as well as re-enforcing previous settlements in the United States, Canada[9] (primarily Toronto, Ontario and Montreal, Quebec), Brazil (specially in the South and Southeast regions), Argentina and Paraguay. In Europe, there remained between 50,000 and 100,000 Ukrainians that settled in the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, and the Netherlands.

This second wave of emigrants re-invigorated Ukrainian organisations in the Americas and Western Europe. In 1967, in New York City, the World Congress of Free Ukrainians was created. Scientific organisations were created. An Institute of Ukrainian Studies at Harvard University was also created.

An attempt was made to unite the various religious organisations (Orthodox and Greek Catholic). However, this did not succeed. In the early 1970s, the Ukrainian Orthodox Church in the United States and Canada and the Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church in Europe, South America, and Australia managed to unite. Most of the other Orthodox churches maintained some religious links. The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church had to wait until 1980 until its synod was recognised by the Vatican. The Ukrainian Evangelical and Baptist churches also created an All-Ukrainian Evangelical-Baptist Union.

Within the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe

Number and share of Ukrainians in the population of the regions of the RSFSR (1979 census)

Post-Second World War, there was a strong net migration in the USSR. Most of the Ukrainian contingent that was leaving the Ukrainian SSR for other areas of the Union settled in places with other migrants. The cultural separation from Ukraine proper meant that many were to form the so-called "multicultural soviet nation". In Siberia, 82% of Ukrainian entered mixed marriages, primarily with Russians. This meant that outside the parent national republic and large cities in the Union there was little or no provisions for continuing a diaspora function. Thus Ukrainian literature and television could be found only in larger cities like Moscow. At the same time other signs of Ukrainian cultural heritage such as clothing and food were preserved. According to a Soviet sociologist, 27% of the Ukrainians in Siberia read Ukrainian printed material and 38% used the Ukrainian language. From time to time, Ukrainian groups would visit Siberia. Nonetheless, most of the Ukrainians did assimilate.

In Eastern Europe, the Ukrainian diaspora can be divided as follows:

In all these countries, Ukrainians had the status of a minority nation with their own socio-cultural organisations, schools, and press. The degree of these rights varied within the region. Yugoslavia granted Ukrainians the most rights.

The largest Ukrainian diaspora was in Poland. It consisted of those Ukrainians, which were left in the western parts of Galicia that after the Second World War remained in Poland and had not emigrated to the Ukrainian SSR or resettled, and those who were resettled to the western and northern parts of Poland, which before the Second World War had been part of Germany.

Ukrainians in Czechoslovakia lived in the Prešov Region, which can be considered Ukrainian ethnographic territory, and had substantial rights. The Ukrainians in the Prešov Region had their own church organisation.

Ukrainians in Romania lived in the Romanian parts of Bukovina and the Maramureş Region, as well as in scattered settlements throughout Romania.

Ukrainians in Yugoslavia lived primarily in Bačka and Srem regions of Vojvodina and Bosnia. These Ukrainians had their own church organisation as the Eparchy of Križevci.

Size

Of the countries where the Ukrainian diaspora had settled, only in Canada and the Soviet Union was information about ethnic background collected. However, the data from the Soviet Union is suspect and underestimates the number of Ukrainians. In 1970, the Ukrainian diaspora can be given as follows:

For the Soviet Union, it can be assumed that about 10-12 million people of Ukrainian (7-9 million in Asia) heritage lived outside the Ukrainian SSR.

Post 1991

After the independence of Ukraine in 1991, many Ukrainians emigrated to Western countries because of an economic depression in the 1990s.

Many Ukrainians live in Russia either along the Ukrainian border or in Siberia. In the 1990s, the number of Ukrainians living in Russia was calculated to be around 5 million.[10] These regions, where Ukrainians live, can be subdivided into 2 categories: Regions along the mixed Ukrainian-Russian border territory and The Far East [citation needed] territory:

Ukrainians can also be found in parts of Romania and Slovakia that border Ukraine.

The size of the Ukrainian diaspora has changed over time due to the following factors:

21st century

As of 2020, the European Union was host of over half a million Ukrainian citizens, according to official records of residents collected by Eurostat. About half of the Ukrainian citizens in the EU were located in Italy.[11]

On 24 February 2022, Russia launched a large-scale invasion of Ukraine, which has led to millions of Ukrainian civilians moving to neighbouring countries. Most crossed into Poland, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic, and others proceeded to at least temporarily settle in Hungary, Moldova, Germany, Austria, Romania and other European countries.[12]

Extended statistics

2004 figures

In 2004, the Ukrainian diaspora was distributed as follows:

Ukrainian diaspora[13][14]
Country Number (thousands) Main Areas of Settlement
Russia[15] 1,928 (census) – 4,379[16][17][18] In the regions of Kursk, Voronezh, Saratov, Samara, Astrakhan, Vladivostok and the Don River. From Orenburg to the Pacific Ocean, in the Primorsky Krai along the Ussuri River, and in the Amur Oblast ("Zeleny Klyn") Norilsk, Magadan, Yakutia and Vorkuta[19][20]
Kazakhstan 896.2-2,400 In the north and urban areas
Canada[21] 1,209 Provinces: Ontario, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Quebec, and British Columbia[22]
Brazil 1,000 States: Paraná, São Paulo, Santa Catarina, and Rio Grande do Sul
United States 900 States: Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Maryland, Florida, California, Texas, and Wisconsin
Moldova 600.4-650 Transnistria, Chişinău
Poland 360-500 [27 (census 2002)] Regions: Western and northern parts of Poland (voivodeships of Olsztyn, Szczecin, Wrocław, Gdańsk, and Poznań)
Greece 350–360 Regions: Northern Greece, Thessaloniki, Athens
Italy 320–350 Regions: North Italy, Naples, Sicily
Belarus 291–500 Brest Oblast
Argentina 100–250 Provinces: Buenos Aires, Misiones, Chaco, Mendoza, Formosa, Córdoba, and Río Negro
Uzbekistan 153.2 Urban Centres
Kyrgyzstan 108 Urban Centres
Paraguay 102 Regions: in the area of Colonia Fram, Sandov, Nuevo Volyn, Bohdanivky, and Tarasivky
Slovakia 40–100 Regions: Eastern Slovakia, Prešov
Latvia[23] 46 Urban Centres[24]
Romania 61-90[25] Regions: Southern Bukovina (Suceava region), Maramureş region, Banat, and Northern Dobruja
former Yugoslavia 60 Regions: Vojvodina (Backa Region), Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Croatia (Slavonia)
Portugal 40–150 Lisbon and surroundings, interior of the country
Georgia 52.4 Urban Centres
Czech Republic 50 Sudetenland
Estonia 48 Urban Centres
Lithuania 44 Urban Centres
Turkmenistan 35.6 Urban Centres
France 35 Regions: Central, Eastern, Southwestern, and Northwestern France
United Kingdom 35 Counties: Greater London, Lancashire, Yorkshire, as well as Central and Northern England and Scotland
Australia 35 States/territories: New South Wales, Victoria, Western Australia, South Australia, Queensland and ACT
Azerbaijan 32.3 Urban Centres
Germany 22 States: Bavaria, Baden-Württemberg, Hesse, North Rhine-Westphalia, and Lower Saxony
Turkey 20 Cities: Istanbul, Antalya, Ankara, İzmir, Bodrum and Mersin
Uruguay 10 Regions: Montevideo, San José, and Paysandú
Armenia 8.3 Urban Centres
Austria 9–10 Region: Vienna and surroundings
Belgium 5 Region: Central and Eastern Belgium
Finland 3–4 Region: Turku, Seinäjoki, Tampere, Helsinki and other big cities in Finland
Hungary 3 Region: The Tisza River Basin
Venezuela 3 Region: Caracas, Valencia, Maracay
New Zealand 2 Regions: Christchurch, Auckland, Wellington
Bulgaria 1.8[26] Region: Sofia, Plovdiv, Dobrich and other big cities in Bulgaria
Chile 1.0-1.5? [citation needed] Region: Santiago, Chile
Netherlands 0.6 Region: on the border with Germany

Ukrainian diaspora distribution around the world

Continent/Country/Region Year Numbers Notes
EUROPE
Andorra 2016 100[27]
Austria 2017 9,064[28] (2016) 12,000; (2015) 8,232; (2010) 7,038; (2005) 6,367; (2000) 5,696; (1995) 5,115; (1990) 4,534; (1946) 29,000; (1944) 100,000; (1918) 50,000[28][29][30][31]
Belarus 2015 225,734[28] (2010–2009) 227,722-159,000; (2005) 230,971; (2000–1999) 234,219-237,000; (1995) 248,032; (1990–1989) 261,845-291,008; (1979) 230,985; (1970) 190,839; (1959) 133,061; (1939) 104,247; (1926) 34,681[28][32][33][34][35]
Belgium 2017 3,397[28] (2015) 4,981; (2010) 2,999; (2005) 1,848; (2000) 2,202; (1995) 2,283; (1990) 2,298; (1949) 5,000; (1947) 10,000; (1945) 2,000; (1939) 1,000[28][29][36][30]
Bosnia and Herzegovina 2013 2,331[37] (1991) 3,929; (1953) 7,455 (1948) 7,883; (1850) 10,000[38][39][40][29]
Bulgaria 2016 1,780[27] (2015) 6,400; (2010) 5,631; (2005) 4,526; (2000) 3,230; (1995) 2,451; (1990) 1,671[28]
Croatia 2011 1,878[41] (2001) 1,977; (1991) 2,494; (1981) 2,515; (1971) 2,793; (1948) 6,397[41][42]
Czech Republic 2016 110,245[43] (2015) 97,474; (2014) 102,127; (2011–2010) 53,253-125,343; (2005) 73,905; (2001) 22,112; (2000) 16,397; (1995) 12,298; (1991) 8,220; (1980) 10,271; (1970) 9,794[28][44][45]
Denmark 2019 11,148[46] (2018) 12,144; (2016) 8,000; (2015) 6,870; (2010) 6,508; (2005) 3,602; (2000) 695; (1995) 650; (1990) 605; (1945) 1,500[28][30][47]
Estonia 2019 23,665[48] (2018) 23,310; (2017) 23,183; (2016) 23,256; (2015) 22,562; (2013) 22,972; (2011) 22,573; (2005) 24,004; (2000) 29,012; (1995) 33,755; (1989) 48,271; (1979) 36,044; (1970) 28,086; (1959) 15,769; (1934) 92; (1897) 230[28][32][48][49][50]
Finland 2016 5,000[51] (2015) 2,436; (2010) 1,040; (2005) 611; (2000) 337; (1995) 113; (1990) 11[52][53][54]
France 2017 16,121[28] (2016) 40,000;[27] (2015) 15,880; (2010) 14,681;[28] (2005) 12,020;[28] (2000) 8,378;[28] (1995) 8,124;[28] (1990) 7,869;[28] (1955–1946) 40,000; (1939) 40,000; (1922) 5,000[29][55]
Germany 2017 262,027[28] (2016) 272,000; (2015) 261,147; (2010) 252,446; (2005) 203,852; (2000) 155,257; (1995) 85,683; (1990) 16,108; (1946) 178,000 in West Germany[28][29][56]
Greece 2017 19,104-32,000[28] (2016) 32,000; (2015) 19,457; (2010) 19,883; (2005) 18,198; (2000) 16,512; (1995) 8,282; (1990) 189[28][57]
Holy See 2017 50 Ukrainian Greek-catholic clergy
Hungary 2011 7,396[58] (2001) 7,393; (2000) 19,867; (1995) 11,454; (1990) 3,040[28][59]
Iceland 2017 335[60] (2015) 274; (2013) 255; (2011) 217; (2009) 215; (2007) 173; (2005) 118; (2003) 63; (2000) 22; (1995) 17; (1990) 11[28][61]
Ireland 2017 4,908[28] (2016) 4,624; (2015) 4,564; (2011) 4,123; (2005) 3,627; (2000) 2,189; (1995) 925; (1990) 170[28][62]
Italy 2017 234,354-236,420[28][63] (2017) 234,354; (2016) 230,728-240,141; (2015–2014) 222,241-219,050; (2012) 180,121; (2010) 222,203; (2007) 600,000-1,000,000; (2005) 117,957; (2000) 13,711; (1995) 6,959; (1990) 206; (1946) 12,000; (1918) 120,000[28][29][64][65][66][55]
Kosovo 2017 42 (2014) 145; (2006) 449; (1991) 24; (1948) 31[67][68][69][70]
Latvia 2019 43,069[71] (2018) 50,699; (2017) 43,623; (2011) 45,798; (2005) 47,145; (2000) 63,644; (1989) 92,101; (1979) 66,703; (1970) 53,461; (1959) 29,440; (1935) 1,844; (1925) 512[28][32][72][73][74][75][76]
Liechtenstein 2017 43[77] (2015) 37; (2010) 20; (2005) 14; (2000) 9; (1995) 6; (1990) 3[28]
Lithuania 2015 12,248[78] (2011–2010) 16,423-14,475; (2005) 18,521; (2001) 22,488; (1995) 25,598; (1989) 44,789; (1979) 31,982; (1970) 25,099; (1959) 17,692; (1923) 43[28][32][79][80][81]
Luxembourg 2017 184-742[28] (2016) 742; (2015) 175; (2010) 115; (2005) 133; (2000) 154; (1995) 160; (1990) 169[28][82]
Macedonia 2017 64[28] (2016) 140; (2010) 60; (2005) 58; (2000) 57; (1995) 61; (1990) 65[27][28]
Malta 2017 896[83] (2015) 336; (2010) 268; (2005) 145; (2000) 92; (1995) 36; (1990) 30[28]
Moldova 2014 325,235[84][85] (2004) 442,475; (1989) 600,366; (1979) 560,679; (1970) 506,560; (1959) 420,820; (1941) 261,200; (1930) 315,004; (1897) 379,698; (1856) 119,000; (1817) 30,000[32][86][87][88]
Monaco 2011 10-20[89]
Montenegro 2017 121[28] (2015) 141; (2010) 135; (1991) 24; (1948) 23[28][90][91]
Netherlands 2023 100.560[28] (2016) 5,000; (2015) 1,208; (2010) 681; (2005) 427; (2000) 92; (1995) 67; (1992) 1,000[28][30][92]
Norway 2020 7,700[93] (2019) 6,285;(2015) 4,236; (2010) 2,463; (2005) 1,120; (2001) 399; (1995) 77; (1990–1970) 6; (1944) 16,562[28][94][95][96][97]
Poland 2018 2,000,000[98] (2016) 1,200,000-1,500,000; (2015) 206,518; (2010) 214,193; (2005) 263,473; (2000) 321,013; (1995) 375,267; (1990) 438,692[28][99][100]
Portugal 2017 47,360[28] (2015) 45,051; (2014) 41,091; (2009) 52,293; (2007) 39,480; (2006) 41,870; (2004) 66,227; (2002) 60,571; (2000) 10,882; (1995) 6,899; (1990) 3,196[28][101][102][103][104][105][45]
Romania 2011 51,703-200,000[106][107] (2002) 61,098-300,000; (1992) 65,472; (1977) 55,510; (1966) 54,705; (1956) 60,479; (1930) 45,875[108][109]
Russian Federation 2015 3,269,992[28] (2010) 1,927,988-2,978,217; (2005) 3,293,929; (2002) 2,942,961; (2000) 3,541,839; (1995) 3,485,074; (1989) 4,362,872; (1979) 3,657,647; (1970) 3,345,885; (1959) 3,359,083; (1939) 3,205,061; (1926) 6,870,976; (1897) 4,164,847[28][32][110][111][112][113]
San Marino 2017 62[28] (2015) 60; (2010) 53; (2005) 50; (2000) 48; (1995) 25; (1990) 4[28]
Serbia 2011 4,903[114] (2002) 5,354; (1991) 5,032; (1953) 23,043; (1948) 22,636[115][116][117][118]
Slovakia 2015 10,001[28] (2011–2010) 7,430-8,258; (2005) 7,365; (2001) 10,814; (1991) 13,281[28][119]
Slovenia 2015 1,764[28] (2010) 1,499; (2005) 884; (2000) 299; (1995) 193; (1990) 89; (1948) 170[28][120]
Spain 2020 112,728[121] (2020) 112,728; (2016) 90,530-100,000; (2015) 84,127; (2010) 79,843; (2005) 61,162; (2000) 2,115; (1995) 1,038; (1990) 408[28][122][123]
Sweden 2019 11,069[124] (2017) 8,000; (2015) 6,982; (2010) 4,741; (2005) 2,777; (2000) 1,459; (1995) 1,360; (1990) 1,146[28]
Switzerland 2017 7,641[28] (2016) 6,681; (2015) 7,367; (2010) 6,269; (2005) 5,401; (2000) 4,638; (1995) 3,109; (1990) 1,593[28][125]
United Kingdom 2015 23,414[28] (2010) 30,000; (2001) 30,000-100,000; (1955) 22,000-27,000; (1949–1946) 33,000-35,000; (1944–1940) 10,000; (1933) 150; (1912) 500[27][126]
ASIA
Afghanistan 2015 10
Armenia 2015 2,645[28] (2011) 1,176; (2005) 1,990; (2001) 1,633; (2000) 3,008; (1995) 5,665; (1989) 8,341; (1979) 8,900; (1970) 8,390; (1959) 5,593; (1939) 5,496; (1926) 2,286[28][32][127][128]
Azerbaijan 2009 21,509[129] (1999) 28,984; (1989) 32,345; (1979) 26,402; (1970) 29,160; (1959) 25,778; (1939) 23,643; (1926) 18,241[32][129]
Bahrain 2016 100-300[130][131]
China 2016 3,000-5,000[132] (1999) 20,000; (1949) 7,000; (1945–1930) 35,000-50,000; (1929–1922) 30,000-45,000; (1920–1898) 65,000-70,000[133][134][135][136]
Hong Kong, China 2016 100[137]
Macau, China 2016 30[138]
Cyprus 2015 3,650[28] (2011) 3,023; (2005) 2,181; (2000) 1,490; (1995) 1,153; (1990) 815[28][139]
Georgia 2015 22,263[28] (2014) 6,034; (2010) 24,030; (2005–2002) 26,802-7,039; (2000) 29,734; (1995) 38,158; (1990–1989) 46,581-52,443; (1979) 45,036; (1970) 49,622; (1959) 52,236; (1939) 45,595; (1926) 14,356[28][32][140][141]
India 2014 120[142][143] (2010) 105; (2007) 96; (2004) 78; (1999) 63[53][54][144][145]
Indonesia 2017 21[146] (1999) 13[53]
Iraq 2010 12[147] (2008) 1690; (2004) 1608[144]
Iran 2019 237[148][149] (2016) 900; (2010) 260; (1999) 603[53][54][150]
Israel 2016 30,000-90,000 [151] (2015–2014) 135,112-36,649; (2010) 131,007-53,577; (2007) 47,019; (2006) 54,497; (2000) 164,271; (1999) 22,261; (1995) 170,963; (1990) 168, 081[28][53][54][69][145]
Japan 2018 1,824[152] (2017) 1,992; (2016) 1,867; (2010) 502 (2006) 236[54][69][153][154]
Jordan 2016 5,000[155] (2010) 892; (2007) 874; (2005) 694; (2000) 480; (1995) 263; (1990) 45[28][145]
Kazakhstan 2015 338,022[28] (2014) 301,346; (2009) 333,031; (1999) 547,065; (1989) 896,240; (1979) 897,964; (1970) 930,158; (1959) 762,131; (1939) 658,319; (1926) 860,822; (1827) 79,573[32][156][157]
Korea, Republic of 2016 2,485[158]
Kuwait 2016 400[159] (2010) 141; (2007) 111; (2004) 94[54][144][145]
Kyrgyzstan 2021 9,243[160] (2014) 14,485; (2009) 21,924; (2005) 41,787; (2000) 52,617; (1999) 50,442; (1995) 69,408; (1989) 108,027; (1979) 109,324; (1970) 120,081; (1959) 137,031; (1939) 137,299; (1926) 64,128[28][32][161][162]
Laos 2016 10[150]
Lebanon 2016 5,000[130] (2010) 1,242; (2007) 977; (2006) 883; (2000) 218; (1995) 120; (1990) 21[28][54][69][145]
Malaysia 2016 500[163] (2010) 44; (2007) 28; (2004) 24[54][144][145]
Maldives 2017 15[164]
Mongolia 2016 20
Myanmar 2016 10[150]
Nepal 2015 196[165]
Oman 2016 200[131]
Pakistan 2010 90[54] (2006) 112; (2004) 37; (1999) 24[53][69][144]
Philippines 2015 31[150]
Qatar 2016 1,000[130]
Saudi Arabia 2016 600[130] (2010) 66; (2004) 140; (1999) 35[53][54][144]
Singapore 2016 500[150] (2014) 221; (2010) 110; (2004) 84[54][144][70]
Syria 2010 574-3,708[28][54] (2007) 644; (2006) 567; (2004) 473[69][144][145]
Taiwan 2017 214 (2021) 214
Tajikistan 2015 1,250[28] (2010) 1,090-1,261; (2005) 1,233; (2000) 3,787; (1989) 41,375; (1979) 35,826; (1970) 31,671; (1959) 26,921; (1939) 17,360; (1926) 1,090[28][32][166]
Thailand 2016 800[150]
Turkey 2016 20,000-35,000[130][167] (2015) 20,547; (2010) 4,133; (2005) 4,011; (2000) 3,893; (1995) 2,447; (1990) 1,011[28][168]
Turkmenistan 2015 4,822[28] (2010) 11,000; (1995) 23,064; (1989) 35,578; (1979) 37,118; (1970) 35,398; (1959) 20,955; (1939) 21,778; (1926) 6,877[32][169][170]
United Arab Emirates 2017 11,145[171] (2014) 5,000; (2007) 588[145][172]
Uzbekistan 2015 124,602[28] (2010) 129,604; (2005) 132,963; (2000) 104,720-131,027; (1995) 153,360; (1989) 153,197; (1979) 113,826; (1970) 114,979; (1959) 87,927; (1939) 70,577; (1926) 25,335[28][32][173]
Vietnam 2016 1,000-2,000[150][174] (2010) 179; (2004) 248; (1999) 337[53][54][144]
Yemen 2011 110[175]
AFRICA
Algeria 2015 300[130] (2010) 203; (2007) 198; (2006) 168[54][69][145]
Angola 2018 440[176] (2007) 14; (2006) 76[69][145]
Cabo Verde 2015 22[28] (2010) 21; (2005) 34; (2000) 46; (1995) 37; (1990) 28[28]
Congo, Democratic Republic 2019 268[148][149] (2014) 282[177][178]
Egypt 2016 4,000[179] (2006) 597; (2000) 125; (1995) 92; (1990) 67[28][69]
Ethiopia 2016 30[130]
Guinea 2015 326[28] (2010) 293; (2007) 169; (2005) 189; (2000) 104; (1995) 96; (1990) 84[28][145]
Kenya 2016 100[180] (2007) 24; (2006) 39[69][145]
Liberia 2014 269[181] (2010) 297; (2004) 318[54][144]
Libya 2016 1,500-2,500[182] (2010) 776; (2005) 709; (2000) 644; (1995) 413; (1990) 189[28]
Madagascar 2017 4
Mauritania 2017 100[183]
Mauritius 2017 22
Morocco 2017 500[184] (2010) 296[54]
Mozambique 2016 400[185]
Namibia 2015 235[28] (2010) 257; (2005) 267; (2000) 338; (1995) 363; (1990) 380[28]
Nigeria 2014 152[181][186] (2010) 100; (2006) 165; (2004) 81[69][144][147]
Senegal 2014 35[187]
Seychelles 2017 3[188]
Sierra Leone 2004 449[144]
South Africa 2016 1,000[130] (2015) 4,090; (2010) 3,012; (2005) 1,887; (2000) 1,577; (1995) 1,488; (1990) 1,822[28]
South Sudan 2017 4
Sudan 2017 6
Tunisia 2015 2,000[189] (2010) 264; (2006) 249[54][69]
Uganda 2017 100[190]
NORTH AMERICA
Bahamas 2015 18[28] (2010) 17; (2005) 9[28]
Canada 2016 1,359,655[191] (2011) 1,251,170; (2006) 1,209,085; (2001) 1,071,055; (1996) 1,026,475; (1991) 1,054,300; (1981) 529,615; (1971) 580,660; (1961) 473,337; (1951) 395,043; (1941) 305,929; (1931) 225,113; (1921) 106,721; (1914) 100,000; (1911) 75,432; (1901) 5,682[192][193][194][29]
Costa Rica 2015 159[28] (2010) 153; (2005) 78; (2000) 119; (1995) 102; (1990) 135[28]
Cuba 2015 577[28] (2010) 641; (2005) 702; (2000) 705; (1995) 1,036; (1990) 1,367[28]
Dominican Republic 2016 1,200-2,000[195] (2015) 76; (2010) 72; (2005) 110; (2000) 148; (1995) 135; (1990) 121[28][196]
Mexico 2015 1,500[197] (2010) 329; (2005) 307; (2000) 322; (1995) 279; (1990) 250[28]
Nicaragua 2015 78[28] (2010) 73; (2005) 69; (2000) 65; (1995) 64; (1990) 80[28]
Panama 2015 502[28] (2010) 428; (2005) 271; (2000) 128; (1995) 94; (1990) 66[28]
United States of America 2016 1,028,492[198] (2015) 986,698; (2013) 968,754-2,000,000; (2010) 939,746; (1990) 740,803; (1980) 730,056; (1975) 2,000,000; (1935) 656,000-700,000; (1914) 350,000; (1900) 350,000; (1899) 100,000; (1892) 50,000[198][199][200][201][202]
SOUTH AMERICA
Argentine 2007 305,000[203][204] (2004) 300,000; (1977) 200,000-240,000; (1960) 70,000; (1939) 50,000-70,000; (1914) 14,000; (1902) 1,600; (1901) 1,700; (1900) 1,600; (1898) 250; (1897) 46; (the end of XVII-beg. of XVIII cen.) 30[205][206]
Bolivia 2015 114[28] (2010) 98; (2005) 106; (2000) 114; (1995) 57[28]
Brazil 2015 600,000[207] (2009) 500,000; (1994) 250,000-400,000; (1970) 120,000; (1914) 45,000; (1895) 5,000[29][208][30][209][210]
Chile 2013 1,000[211][212] (2010) 98; (2005) 128; (2000) 157; (1995) 96; (1990) 35; (1970) 40; (1949–1948) 300[28][213]
Colombia 2015 226[28] (2010) 211; (2005) 188; (2000) 197; (1995) 203; (1990) 208[28]
Ecuador 2015 401[28] (2010) 276; (2005) 197; (2000) 167; (1995) 151; (1990) 134[28]
Paraguay 2018 10,000-12,000[214] (2014) 12,000-40,000; (1994) 5,000-8,000; (1938–1927) 10,800[199][214][215][216]
Peru 2017 500[217] (2015) 241; (2010) 223; (2007) 109; (2005) 206; (2000) 176; (1995) 150; (1990) 171[28][145]
Uruguay 2018 300[218] (1990) 10,000-15,000; (1970) 8,000-10,000[213][219][220]
Venezuela 2013 3,000[212] (1987) 1,100; (1968) 1,500; (1947) 3,400; (1946) 8[221]
OCEANIA
Australia 2011 38,791[222] (2006) 37,800; (1998) 30,000-50,000; (1990–1980) 34,000; (1970–1945) 20,608; (1914) 5,000[223][224][225][226]
New Zealand 2018 672-1,152[227] (2015) 672–1,402; (2010) 1,263; (2005) 1,104; (2000) 817; (1995) 330; (1990) 247; (1949) 170[28][228]
Vanuatu 2016 5[229]
ANTARCTICA 2020 11 [230] (2019–2013) 12; (2012–2011) 11; (2010) 10; (2009) 11; (2008–2007) 14; (2006–2005) 13; (2004) 15; (2003) 15–36; (2002) 15; (2001) 12; (2000) 13; (1999) 12; (1998) 11; (1997) 13; (1996) 12; (1994) 4[230][231] Scientific and technical activities. Staff of Ukrainian Vernadsky Research Base (Galindez Island, Wilhelm Archipelago, Graham Land)

Communities

Europe

Finland

Main article: Finnish Ukrainians

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (May 2022)

France

Main article: Ukrainians in France

According to INSEE, the Ukrainian population of France was 24,700 in 2017.[232]

Germany

Main article: Ukrainians in Germany

Italy

Main article: Ukrainians in Italy

Italy has the biggest Ukrainian minority in Western Europe, accounting for more than 230,000 people.

Poland

Main article: Ukrainians in Poland

This section should include a summary of Ukrainians in Poland. See Wikipedia:Summary style for information on how to incorporate it into this article's main text. (May 2018)

Portugal

Main article: Ukrainians in Portugal

This section should include a summary of Ukrainians in Portugal. See Wikipedia:Summary style for information on how to incorporate it into this article's main text. (May 2018)

Ukrainians constituted the second-largest foreign community residing in Portugal, with 44,074 residents in 2012.

Russia

Group of prominent Ukrainians in Russia.

Main article: Ukrainians in Russia

This section should include a summary of Ukrainians in Russia. See Wikipedia:Summary style for information on how to incorporate it into this article's main text. (May 2018)

As of 2021, there are 884,007 ethnic Ukrainians in Russia. They form the country's eighth-largest ethnic group.

Serbia

"Ukrainians in Serbia" redirects here

In Serbia, there are 4,903 (0.08%) ethnic Ukrainians with Serbian citizenship according to the 2011 census.[233] According to the 2002 census there were 5,354 (0.82%) and according to the 1991 census 5,042. Until 1971, Ukrainians and Pannonian Rusyns were counted together.

Spain

Ukrainian supporters in Corunna, Galicia, Spain.

According to official Spanish statistics, there are 112,728 Ukrainians in Spain as of late 2019, being the 11th biggest foreign nationality found in Spain.[121]

United Kingdom

Main article: Ukrainians in the United Kingdom

List of notable British people of Ukrainian descent:

North America

Canada

Main article: Ukrainian Canadians

In 2016, there were an estimated 1,359,655 persons of full or partial Ukrainian origin residing in Canada (the majority being Canadian-born citizens), making them Canada's eleventh largest ethnic group. Canada therefore has the world's second-largest Ukrainian population outside Ukraine, after Russia.[236]

United States

Main article: Ukrainian Americans

This section should include a summary of Ukrainian Americans. See Wikipedia:Summary style for information on how to incorporate it into this article's main text. (May 2018)

According to a 2006 government estimate, there were 976,314 Americans of Ukrainian ancestry.[237]

South America

Brazil

Main article: Ukrainian Brazilians

See also

Notes

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References

Further reading