Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol
Select committee
Active

United States House of Representatives
117th Congress
History
FormedJuly 1, 2021
Leadership
ChairBennie Thompson (D)
Since July 1, 2021
Vice chairLiz Cheney (R)
Since September 2, 2021
Structure
Seats9
Political partiesMajority (7)
  •   Democratic (7)
Minority (2)
Jurisdiction
PurposeTo investigate the attack on the United States Capitol on January 6, 2021
Senate counterpartNone
Website
january6th.house.gov

The U.S. House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol is a select committee of the U.S. House of Representatives formed through a largely party-line vote on July 1, 2021, to investigate the attack on the U.S. Capitol on January 6 of that year.[1] The attack was a culmination of the attempts to overturn the 2020 United States presidential election, which incumbent Republican Donald Trump lost against Democrat Joe Biden. The membership of the committee was a point of significant political contention, with House Republicans boycotting the committee except for Liz Cheney and Adam Kinzinger.

The investigation commenced with public hearings on July 27, when four police officers testified. By the end of 2021, the committee had interviewed over 300 people.[2][3] Two witnesses, Steve Bannon and Mark Meadows, have been held in criminal contempt of Congress for refusing to testify; Bannon was indicted by a federal grand jury. The committee, as reported by The Washington Post in December 2021, was considering recommending that the U.S. Department of Justice open a criminal investigation into Donald Trump's involvement.[4]

Members, 117th congress

Majority Minority

In July 2021, Thompson announced the senior staff for the committee. They included:[6]

In August 2021, Denver Riggleman, a former U.S. House representative, and Joe Maher, a principal deputy general counsel at the Department of Homeland Security, were hired as staffers,[7] and Timothy J. Heaphy was appointed as the committee's chief investigative counsel.[8]

History

Logo of the committee
Logo of the committee

In the aftermath of the 2021 United States Capitol attack, the proposal to form a bicameral commission failed due to a filibuster from Republicans in the Senate.[9] In late May, when it had become apparent that the filibuster would not be overcome, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi indicated that she would appoint a select committee to investigate the events as a fallback option.[10][11][12][13]

On June 30, 2021, the resolution to form the committee passed by a vote of 222 to 190, with all Democratic members and two Republican members, Adam Kinzinger and Liz Cheney, voting in favor. Sixteen Republican members did not vote.[14] The resolution empowered Pelosi to appoint eight members to the committee, and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy could appoint five members "in consultation" with Pelosi.[15] Pelosi indicated that she would name a Republican as one of her eight appointees.[16]

On July 1, Pelosi appointed eight members, seven Democrats and one Republican, Liz Cheney (R-WY); Bennie Thompson (D-MS) would serve as committee chair.[17] On July 19, McCarthy announced the five members he would recommend as the minority on the select committee. He recommended that Jim Banks (R-IN) serve as Ranking Member, and minority members be Jim Jordan (R-OH), Rodney Davis (R-IL), Kelly Armstrong (R-ND), and Troy Nehls (R-TX).[18] Banks, Jordan, and Nehls voted to overturn the Electoral College results in Arizona and Pennsylvania. Banks and Jordan had also signed onto the Supreme Court case Texas v. Pennsylvania to invalidate the ballots of voters in four states.[19]

On July 21, Thompson stated in an interview that he would investigate Trump as part of the inquiry into Capitol attack.[20] Hours later, Pelosi said in a statement that she had informed McCarthy that she would reject the recommendations of Jordan and Banks, citing concerns for the investigation's integrity and relevant actions and statements made by the two members. She approved the recommendations of the other three.[21] McCarthy then pulled all of his picks for the committee and stated that he would not appoint anyone on the committee unless all five of his choices were approved.[22][23]

After McCarthy rescinded his recommendations, Pelosi appointed Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) to the committee.[24] Kinzinger was one of the ten House Republicans who voted for Trump's second impeachment.[25] Pelosi was also considering to hire a Republican as an outside committee staffer or advisor, such as former Rep. Denver Riggleman (R-VA), who met with Cheney and Pelosi. Cheney voiced her support and pushed for both of their involvement.[25] On July 25, Pelosi officially announced the appointment of Kinzinger to the select committee.[26]

Investigation

The committee's work is ongoing. Its investigative teams each focus on a specific area like funding, individuals' motivations, organizational coalitions, and how Trump may have pressured other politicians.[27] As of the end of 2021, it had interviewed over 300 witnesses and obtained over 35,000 documents.[2]

While the investigation is still in progress, it publicly communicates some, but not all, of the information it finds. Public hearings are expected to begin in early 2022.[28] The chair of the committee, Representative Bennie Thompson, initially said he hoped the committee could complete its work by early 2022,[29] but a final report may not be published until summer.[28]

Ultimately, the committee's findings may be used to inform new legislation. For example, in October 2021, committee members were already collaborating to draft a bill that would clarify the procedures for certifying presidential elections.[30]

The committee's findings may also be used in arguments to hold individuals legally accountable. For example, Representative Liz Cheney, who serves on the committee, suggested that Trump may have committed a felony by obstructing the electoral certification proceedings. There are different types of obstruction; in this case, it could carry a relatively high maximum sentence of 20 years.[31] Seditious conspiracy, a charge brought against individuals including the leader of the Oath Keepers,[32] is a possible charge for Trump.[33][34] The committee was also considering wire fraud criminal referrals against Republicans who raised money off assertions of a stolen election they knew to be untrue.[35][36] The U.S. Department of Justice has the authority to bring criminal charges against political leaders.[37] Congress sometimes recommends criminal charges, but a "recommendation" or "referral" has no legal force in itself.[38] Trump's lawyers have argued that the committee's investigation should be properly limited to matters that have a "valid legislative purpose" and that any interest in recommending criminal charges, when expressed by the committee, may suggest that the committee's focus is impermissibly turning toward "law enforcement".[39]

A conviction, in turn, may be used to bar individuals from running for office in the future, as insurrectionists are constitutionally ineligible to hold public office. It is, however, unclear who enforces that.[40][41]

Revelations

Some of the most revealing information has come from former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows. Although he may have failed to provide a complete set of requested documents,[42] he did provide thousands of emails and text messages[43][42] which revealed how certain people participated in efforts to overturn the election results:

Some of the communications also revealed Trump allies who privately expressed disagreement with the events of January 6 while still defending Trump in public:

The committee has obtained firsthand testimony from multiple people in Trump's inner circle who say he was repeatedly advised during the riot to address the nation to stop the violence. His delay in doing so is being characterized as a possible "dereliction of duty".[50]

One of the most revealing documents provided by Meadows was a PowerPoint presentation[51][52][53] describing a strategy for overturning the election results. The presentation had been distributed by Phil Waldron, a retired Army colonel (now owning a bar in Texas)[54] who specialized in psychological operations and who later became a Trump campaign associate. A 36-page version had metadata dating it to January 5.[55][56][52] A version was sent to Meadows on January 5,[57][58][59] and he provided a 38-page version to the Committee which, according to The Guardian, was not substantially different from the 36-page version.[55] It recommended that Trump declare a national security emergency to delay the January 6 electoral certification, invalidate all ballots cast by machine, and order the military to seize and recount all paper ballots.[57][58] (Meadows claims he personally did not act on this plan.[57]) Waldron was associated with former Trump national security advisor Michael Flynn and other military-intelligence veterans who played key roles in spreading false information to allege the election had been stolen from Trump.[60][54]

Obstacles

One of the main challenges to the committee's investigation was Trump's use of legal tactics to try to block the release of the White House communication records held at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).[61] He succeeded in delaying the release of the documents for about five months. The committee received the documents on January 20, 2022.[62][63]

The committee began its request in August 2021.[64][65] Trump asserted executive privilege over the documents.[66] Current president Joe Biden rejected that claim,[67][68] as did a federal judge (who noted that Trump was no longer president),[69] the DC Circuit Court of Appeals,[70] and the U.S. Supreme Court.[71] While the request for NARA documents was being litigated, the committee agreed to a Biden administration request that they forego obtaining certain documents from NARA relating to sensitive national security matters that had no bearing on events of January 6.[72]

Another difficulty is that Trump has told Republican leaders not to cooperate with the committee.[73][74][75][76] While hundreds of people have testified voluntarily,[3] the committee has also had to issue dozens of subpoenas[77] to legally compel certain uncooperative individuals to testify. Some people who were subpoenaed nevertheless refused to testify: Roger Stone and John Eastman pleaded their Fifth Amendment rights, while Steve Bannon and Mark Meadows were found in contempt of Congress. In December 2021, Michael Flynn sued to block a subpoena for his phone records and to delay his testimony, though a federal judge dismissed his suit within a day.[78]

The American Conservative Union is providing legal defense funds for some people who resist the committee. The organization says it only assists people who do not cooperate with the committee and who oppose its mission, according to chairman Matt Schlapp.[79]

Timeline of proceedings

2021

2022

  • Politico reported the committee was attempting to retrace Trump's efforts to subvert the election at the state level, especially in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan and Pennsylvania. The committee had acquired thousands of documents and interviewed state officials. Secretaries of state in Arizona and Michigan provided the committee with forged certificates of ascertainment created by unauthorized individuals that falsely asserted Trump won their states' electoral votes; the Arizona document used the official state seal. The unauthorized individuals had sent the fraudulent documents to NARA, which rejected them.[190]
  • The New York Times reported that the committee considered Pence's testimony particularly important because after he refused on January 5 to play the Pence Card, Trump harshly attacked him verbally and told his January 6 rally crowd "If Mike Pence does the right thing, we win the election." The Times reported federal prosecutors were asking defense attorneys of indicted rioters if their clients would admit in sworn statements that they stormed the Capitol believing Trump wanted them to stop Pence from certifying the election. One member of Proud Boys who pleaded guilty said he had conspired with other members to "send a message to legislators and Vice President Pence." Another rioter stated in her guilty plea that she marched on the Capitol specifically after hearing Trump encourage Pence to "do the right thing."[191]
  • The committee asked Republican House minority leader Kevin McCarthy to voluntarily provide information; McCarthy said hours later he would not cooperate. In a letter to McCarthy, the committee noted that he spoke to Trump before the attack, reportedly advising him that attempts to object to the election results were "doomed to fail," and during the attack, imploring him to intervene, but after meeting with Trump at Mar-a-Lago on January 28 the tone of McCarthy's public comments "changed markedly." Six days after the attack, McCarthy said in a radio interview that he supported a bipartisan commission and grand jury to investigate and that Trump "told me personally that he does have some responsibility." The next day, McCarthy stated on the House floor that Trump "bears responsibility for Wednesday's attack on Congress by mob rioters." The committee asked if Trump or his aides discussed the change in tone with McCarthy in consideration of an impeachment proceeding or subsequent investigation. McCarthy ultimately opposed the formation of a bipartisan January 6 commission and the House committee.[192][193][194][195][196][197]
  • CNN reported the committee was investigating fraudulent certificates of ascertainment created by Trump allies in seven states in late-December 2020. The documents had been published by the watchdog group American Oversight in March 2021 but received little attention until January 2022. Michigan attorney general Dana Nessel announced on January 14 that after a months-long investigation she had asked the U.S. Justice Department to open a criminal investigation.[198][199][200]

Subpoenas

By the end of 2021, the committee had interviewed over 300 people.[2][3] One of CNN's sources said that "many people every week" and sometimes "multiple people a day" are testifying.[43] Some testify voluntarily. When someone does not wish to testify or provide documents, the committee may issue subpoenas to legally compel the person to appear. As of January 19, 2022, it had subpoenaed at least 63 people[77] (scheduling them to testify on various dates[209]) plus the phone records of over 100 people.[210] A dozen people as of December 22, 2021 had sued to prevent the release of their phone records.[211] The committee may have issued additional subpoenas that it has not revealed publicly.[43] Representative Thompson, the committee chair, told NBC's Meet the Press on January 2, 2022 that the committee was still unsure whether it had the authority to subpoena sitting members of Congress, but he said they would have "no reluctance" to do so if it is deemed possible.[212]

Subpoenas
Name Role Subpoenaed Deposition Outcome
Mark Meadows former White House chief of staff September 23, 2021 November 12, 2021 did not appear;[96] later cooperated, then stopped[213][153] and sued[214]
Daniel Scavino former White House deputy chief of staff for communications September 23, 2021 postponed[215]
Kash Patel former Defense Department official September 23, 2021 postponed[216] did not appear[217]
Stephen Bannon former Trump adviser September 23, 2021 October 14, 2021 did not appear; indicted[137]
Amy Kremer founder and chair of Women For America First September 29, 2021 October 29, 2021[218]
Kylie Kremer founder and executive director of Women For America First September 29, 2021 October 29, 2021[218]
Cynthia Chafian submitted the first permit application on behalf of WFAF for the January 6 rally, and founder of the Eighty Percent Coalition September 29, 2021 October 28, 2021[209]
Caroline Wren "VIP Advisor" for January 6, per rally permit September 29, 2021 October 26, 2021[209]
Maggie Mulvaney "VIP Lead" for January 6, per rally permit September 29, 2021 October 26, 2021[209]
Justin Caporale Event Strategies, Inc.; "Project Manager" for January 6, per rally permit September 29, 2021 October 25, 2021[209]
Tim Unes Event Strategies, Inc.; "Stage Manager" for January 6, per rally permit September 29, 2021 October 25, 2021[209]
Megan Powers MPowers Consulting LLC; "Operations Manager for Scheduling and Guidance" for January 6, per rally permit September 29, 2021 October 21, 2021[209]
Hannah Salem Stone logistics for rally September 29, 2021 October 22, 2021[209]
Lyndon Brentnall “on-site supervisor” for the rally; owner of a security company September 29, 2021 October 22, 2021[209]
Katrina Pierson national spokesperson for the 2016 Trump campaign September 29, 2021 November 3, 2021[209]
Ali Alexander connected to "Stop the Steal" rally permit October 7, 2021 October 29, 2021[209]
Nathan Martin connected to "Stop the Steal" rally permit October 7, 2021 October 28, 2021[209]
Stop the Steal LLC organization; George B. Coleman, "custodian of records," will be deposed October 7, 2021 unknown[219]
Jeffrey Clark former DOJ official October 13, 2021 October 29, 2021[209] appeared November 5; refused to testify, invoking executive privilege[220]
William Stepien Trump 2020 campaign manager November 8, 2021 December 13, 2021[209]
Jason Miller Trump campaign senior advisor November 8, 2021 December 10, 2021[209]
John C. Eastman conservative lawyer and former professor November 8, 2021 December 8, 2021[209] refused to testify, invoking Fifth Amendment[221]
Michael Flynn former Trump national security advisor November 8, 2021 postponed[222][209] unsuccessfully sued to invalidate the subpoena[223][211]
Angela McCallum Trump campaign executive assistant November 8, 2021 November 30, 2021[209][224]
Bernard Kerik present at the meetings at the Willard Hotel November 8, 2021 December 3, 2021[209] Met voluntarily with committee on January 13, 2022[225]
Nicholas Luna personal assistant to Trump November 9, 2021 postponed[222][209]
Molly Michael Oval Office operations coordinator November 9, 2021 December 2, 2021[209]
Ben Williamson senior advisor to chief of staff Mark Meadows November 9, 2021 December 2, 2021[209]
Christopher Liddell deputy chief of staff November 9, 2021 November 30, 2021[209]
John McEntee White House personnel director November 9, 2021 December 15, 2021[209]
Keith Kellogg national security adviser to Pence November 9, 2021 December 1, 2021[209] testified[226]
Kayleigh McEnany former White House Press Secretary November 9, 2021 December 3, 2021[209] appeared on January 12[227]
Stephen Miller senior advisor for policy November 9, 2021 December 14, 2021[209]
Cassidy Hutchinson special assistant for legislative affairs November 9, 2021 December 1, 2021[209]
Kenneth Klukowski senior counsel to assistant attorney general Jeffrey Clark November 9, 2021 December 1, 2021[209]
Alex Jones InfoWars host November 22, 2021 December 18, 2021[139]
Roger Stone Republican operative November 22, 2021 December 17, 2021[139] refused to testify, invoking Fifth Amendment[228]
Duston Stockton Stop the Steal organizer November 22, 2021 December 14, 2021[229]
Jennifer Lawrence Stop the Steal organizer November 22, 2021 December 15, 2021[229]
Taylor Budowich Trump spokesman; communications director of Save America PAC November 22, 2021 December 16, 2021[229] testified; sued to block release of financial records, but the committee had already received them[230][231]
Oath Keepers militia organization November 23, 2021[142]
Proud Boys far-right organization November 23, 2021[142]
Stewart Rhodes Oath Keepers leader November 23, 2021 December 14, 2021[142]
Enrique Tarrio Proud Boys leader November 23, 2021 December 15, 2021[142]
Robert Patrick Lewis 1st Amendment Praetorian[232] November 23, 2021 December 16, 2021[142]
Telecom carriers call detail records for over 100 people summer/fall 2021[155] n/a n/a
Max Miller former Trump aide December 10, 2021 January 2022[233][234]
Robert Peede Jr. former Trump deputy assistant December 10, 2021 January 2022[233][234]
Brian Jack former Trump director of political affairs December 10, 2021 January 2022[233][234]
Bryan Lewis Trump aide who helped plan rally December 10, 2021 January 2022[233][234]
Ed Martin Trump ally who helped plan rally December 10, 2021 January 2022[233][234]
Kimberly Fletcher ties to "Moms for America," helped plan rallies December 10, 2021 January 2022[233][234]
Phil Waldron author of a PowerPoint slideshow about how to overturn the election December 16, 2021 January 17, 2022[235]
Andy Surabian adviser to Donald Trump Jr. January 11, 2022[231]
Arthur Schwartz adviser to Donald Trump Jr. January 11, 2022[231]
Ross Worthington former White House official; helped Trump draft his January 6 rally speech January 11, 2022[231][236]
Meta, Alphabet, YouTube, Twitter, Reddit Social media companies January 13, 2022[236]
Rudy Giuliani former Trump personal attorney January 18, 2022[237] February 8, 2022[238]
Sidney Powell former Trump attorney January 18, 2022[237] February 8, 2022[239]
Jenna Ellis former Trump attorney January 18, 2022[237] February 8, 2022[240]
Boris Epshteyn former Trump advisor January 18, 2022[237] February 8, 2022[241]
Eric Trump son of Trump reported January 18, 2022 phone metadata[242] records obtained[243]
Kimberly Guilfoyle fiancé of Donald Trump Jr. reported January 18, 2022 phone metadata[242] records obtained[244]
Nick Fuentes Groypers leader, White Nationalist Activist, podcast host January 19, 2022[245] February 9, 2022[246]
Patrick Casey Right wing activist January 19, 2022[245] February 9, 2022[247]

Reactions

Prior to committee formation

According to several reports, Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy had warned Republican members that if they allowed Speaker Pelosi to appoint them to the select committee, they would be stripped of all their other committee assignments and should not expect to receive any future ones from Pelosi. In an interview with Forbes, Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) said "Who gives a shit" and added, "When you've got people who say crazy stuff and you're not gonna make that threat, but you make that threat to truth-tellers, you've lost any credibility."[248]

House Leader McCarthy called the rejection of his initial recommendations "unprecedented" in a phone call with Pelosi. In a press conference, he labeled her a "lame duck speaker" out to destroy the institution. The Freedom Caucus pushed for McCarthy to file a motion to vacate the speakership, and punish Cheney and Kinzinger for accepting their appointments to the committee.[249][250] McCarthy later dubbed them "Pelosi Republicans."[80][81] Republicans also stated that if they won the House majority in the 2022 midterm elections, they would come after Democratic committee assignments, targeting Eric Swalwell and Ilhan Omar.[250] Steve Scalise stated that Pelosi had removed any credibility from the committee for rejecting their recommended members and opted instead for a political narrative.[250] Republicans Scott Perry, Chip Roy, and Kelly Armstrong expressed their disdain for both Cheney and Kinzinger and questioned their loyalty to the House Republican Conference, pushing for them to be stripped of their committee assignments.[249][80] Jim Banks and Mike Rogers stated that the two GOP committee members would be stuck to Pelosi's narrative of events.[80] Cheney and Kinzinger both dismissed comments from their colleagues.[80]

After Speaker Nancy Pelosi rejected two of Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's picks for the committee, The Wall Street Journal editorial board criticized Pelosi's rejection of McCarthy's picks. It acknowledged that McCarthy's picks were partisan, but claimed that Adam Schiff, who was appointed by Pelosi, had "lied repeatedly about the evidence concerning the Trump campaign’s collusion with Russia." The editorial board posited, "if Mrs. Pelosi thinks the evidence for her conclusion is persuasive, why would she not want to have it tested against the most aggressive critics?"[251] On the other hand, the San Francisco Chronicle editorial board said: "Pelosi's chief mistake was not also rejecting Rep. Troy Nehls of Texas, who, like Jordan, Banks and a majority of House Republicans, voted to overturn the election on the day of the insurrection. No serious investigation of the riot can be undertaken by those who shared the goals of the rioters." It added that "McCarthy and company killed an independent, bipartisan commission to investigate the attack even though the Republicans' top negotiator agreed to the terms."[252]

After committee formation

Some House Republicans—including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Representative Jim Jordan—said they did not watch the committee's first hearing on July 27, 2021. Representative Matthew M. Rosendale said he watched Representative Liz Cheney speak (and was "quite disappointed") but did not watch the police officers' testimony. Republican Conference Chair Elise Stefanik would not say whether she watched.[253]

In late August 2021, after the committee asked telecommunications and social media companies to retain certain records, McCarthy declared that if the companies "turn over private information" to the House committee, then the companies are "in violation of federal law and subject to losing their ability to operate in the United States", and that a future Republican legislative majority will hold the companies "fully accountable".[254] In response to McCarthy's comment, the watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) filed a complaint on September 3 with the chief counsel of the Office of Congressional Ethics. CREW noted that the subpoena was legally valid and claimed that McCarthy was illegally obstructing the investigation insofar as he was “threatening retaliation" against the telecommunications companies.[255] Eleven House Republicans who were associated with the January 6 "Stop the Steal" rally sent a September 3 letter to thirteen telecommunications companies stating they "do not consent to the release of confidential call records or data" and threatened legal action against what they asserted were unconstitutional subpoenas.[256][257][258][259]

During a September 2 television interview, McCarthy was asked about "how deeply [Trump] was involved," to which he replied that the FBI and Senate committees had found "no involvement."[260] He and other Republicans had cited an exclusive Reuters report that unnamed current and former law enforcement officials said the FBI had found "scant evidence" of an organized plot to overturn the election. In a September 4 statement, Thompson and Cheney said the committee had queried executive branch agencies and congressional committees investigating the matter and "it's been made clear to us that reports of such a conclusion are baseless."[261][262]

On October 16, The Lincoln Project co-founder Rick Wilson criticized the committee's glacial progress, stating that "I don't believe that they're pursuing this with the degree of vigor that merits the type of targets they're talking about. We're dealing with people like Steve Bannon and Roger Stone and Ali Alexander ... They've had three months, they've done almost nothing."[263]

Representative Scott Perry said on December 21 that he would not cooperate with the committee because, in his view, the committee itself was "illegitimate, and not duly constituted under the rules of the US House of Representatives."[264] Similarly, on January 23, 2022, Newt Gingrich said on Fox News that he believed the committee was breaking laws, but he did not specify which laws.[265]

On December 23, Laurence Tribe, American legal scholar and University Professor Emeritus of Constitutional Law at Harvard University, and colleagues published in The New York Times about Attorney General Merrick Garland: "Only by holding the leaders of the Jan. 6 insurrection — all of them — to account can he secure the future and teach the next generation that no one is above the law. If he has not done so already, we implore the attorney general to step up to that task."[266]

Polling

According to a poll conducted in July 2021 by Politico, a majority of Americans support the January 6 investigation, with 58% overall supporting and 29% opposing; 52% of Republicans polled opposed it.[267] When Politico repeated the poll in December 2021, again, three-fifths supported the committee, including 82% of Democrats, 58% of independents, and 40% of Republicans.[268]

In an August 2021 Harvard CAPS-Harris Poll, 58% of American voters said they thought the committee was biased, while 42% thought it was fair.[269] In September 2021, a Pew Research poll found that only 11% of American adults said they were very confident the committee would be fair and reasonable while another 34% were somewhat confident, while a 54% majority said they were not too confident (32%) or not at all confident (22%). Confidence was highly partisan: Nearly two-thirds of Democrats and less than a quarter of Republicans said they were at least somewhat confident.[270]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Committees". House.gov. Retrieved July 22, 2021.
  2. ^ a b c Broadwater, Luke (January 3, 2022). "The Jan. 6 Committee's Consideration of a Criminal Referral, Explained". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  3. ^ a b c Jansen, Bart (December 2, 2021). "House Jan. 6 panel has interviewed 250 people and is planning weeks of public hearings next year". USA Today. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  4. ^ a b Hamburger, Tom; Alemany, Jacqueline; Dawsey, Josh; Zapotosky, Matt (December 23, 2021). "Thompson says Jan. 6 committee focused on Trump's hours of silence during attack, weighing criminal referrals". The Washington Post. Retrieved December 24, 2021.
  5. ^ "Chairman Thompson Announces Representative Cheney as Select Committee Vice Chair". Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol. September 2, 2021. Retrieved September 2, 2021.
  6. ^ "Thompson Announces Senior Staff for Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol". Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol. July 22, 2021. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  7. ^ Amy B., Wang (August 7, 2021). "Jan. 6 committee hires former GOP congressman Denver Riggleman as senior staff member". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  8. ^ Cain, Andrew (August 12, 2021). "Heaphy to serve as chief investigative counsel for committee probing Jan. 6 attack on U.S. Capitol". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Archived from the original on August 13, 2021. Retrieved August 16, 2021.
  9. ^ Lowell, Hugo (May 29, 2021). "How Mitch McConnell killed the US Capitol attack commission". Guardian US. Retrieved August 24, 2021.
  10. ^ Swanson, Ian (May 26, 2021). "GOP gambles with Pelosi in opposing Jan. 6 commission". The Hill. Retrieved May 28, 2021.
  11. ^ Pelosi, Nancy (June 28, 2021). "Pelosi Statement on the Introduction of H.Res. 503 Establishing the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol". Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. Retrieved June 28, 2021.
  12. ^ Smith, Allan (June 24, 2021). "Pelosi announces select committee to investigate Jan. 6 Capitol riot". NBC News. Retrieved June 24, 2021.
  13. ^ Herb, Jeremy; Foran, Clare; Nobles, Ryan; Diaz, Daniella (June 24, 2021). "Pelosi announces the House will establish a select committee to investigate Capitol riot". CNN. Retrieved June 24, 2021.
  14. ^ Segers, Grace (June 30, 2021). "House votes to create select committee to investigate January 6 attack". CBS News. Retrieved December 20, 2021.
  15. ^ Herb, Jeremy; Raju, Manu; Nobles, Ryan; Grayer, Annie (June 30, 2021). "House votes to create select committee to investigate January 6 insurrection". CNN. Retrieved July 4, 2021.
  16. ^ Segers, Grace (July 1, 2021). "Pelosi names members of January 6 select committee, including Liz Cheney". CBS News. Retrieved July 4, 2021.
  17. ^ Freking, Kevin (July 2, 2021). "A look at 8 lawmakers appointed to probe Jan. 6 attack". AP News. Retrieved December 20, 2021.
  18. ^ Beavers, Olivia; Caygle, Heather (July 19, 2021). "McCarthy makes his 5 GOP picks for Jan. 6 select committee". Politico. Retrieved July 19, 2021.
  19. ^ Grayer, Annie; Zanona, Melanie (July 20, 2021). "Jim Jordan among 5 House Republicans selected by McCarthy for January 6 select committee". CNN. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  20. ^ Lowell, Hugo (July 21, 2021). "Capitol attack committee chair vows to investigate Trump: 'Nothing is off limits'". The Guardian. Retrieved August 30, 2021.
  21. ^ "Pelosi Statement on Republican Recommendations to Serve on the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol". Speaker Nancy Pelosi. July 21, 2021. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  22. ^ Grayer, Annie; Herb, Jeremy (July 21, 2021). "McCarthy pulls his 5 GOP members from 1/6 committee after Pelosi rejects 2 of his picks". CNN. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  23. ^ Lowell, Hugo (July 21, 2021). "McCarthy pulls five Republicans from Capitol attack panel after Pelosi rejects two". The Guardian. Retrieved August 30, 2021.
  24. ^ Guilford, Gwynn (July 25, 2021). "Rep. Adam Kinzinger Named to Jan. 6 Committee". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved December 20, 2021.
  25. ^ a b Zanona, Melanie; Raju, Manu (July 22, 2021). "Pelosi looks to bolster bipartisan standing of 1/6 panel with potential addition of GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger". CNN. Retrieved July 23, 2021.
  26. ^ "Pelosi Announces Appointment of Congressman Adam Kinzinger to Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol". Speaker Nancy Pelosi. July 25, 2021. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  27. ^ a b Polantz, Katelyn; Mallonee, Mary Kay (December 25, 2021). "January 6 committee ramps up efforts to uncover funding behind Capitol riot". CNN. Retrieved December 27, 2021.
  28. ^ a b Alemany, Jacqueline; Hamburger, Tom (December 27, 2021). "Committee investigating Jan. 6 attack plans to begin a more public phase of its work in the new year". Washington Post. Retrieved December 28, 2021.
  29. ^ Cheney, Kyle; Beavers, Olivia (September 20, 2021). "Inside Thompson and Cheney's Jan. 6 probe alliance — both genuine and strategic". Politico. Retrieved December 19, 2021.
  30. ^ Herb, Jeremy; Brown, Pamela (October 30, 2021). "House select committee targets 134-year-old law in effort to prevent another January 6". CNN. Retrieved December 19, 2021.
  31. ^ a b Cheney, Kyle; Wu, Nicholas (December 15, 2021). "Jan. 6 investigators mull whether Trump violated obstruction law". Politico. Archived from the original on December 20, 2021. Retrieved December 22, 2021.
  32. ^ Polantz, Katelyn; Rabinowitz, Hannah; Lybrand, Holmes; Sneed, Tierney (January 13, 2022). "Oath Keepers leader and 10 others charged with 'seditious conspiracy'". CNN. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  33. ^ Papenfuss, Mary (January 4, 2022). "Trump Could Be Hit With 'Seditious Conspiracy' Charge, Former U.S. Prosecutor Says". HuffPost. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  34. ^ Polantz, Katelyn (September 10, 2021). "Feds cite 'seditious conspiracy' in warrant for lawyer's phone". Pasadena Star News. Retrieved January 7, 2022.
  35. ^ a b Blake, Aaron (December 14, 2021). "What crime might Trump have committed on Jan. 6? Liz Cheney points to one". The Washington Post. Retrieved December 20, 2021.
  36. ^ Michael S. Schmidt; Luke Broadwater (December 20, 2021). "Jan. 6 Committee Weighs Possibility of Criminal Referrals". The New York Times.
  37. ^ Ex-Trump aide reveals the text she sent to Meadows on Jan. 6 - CNN Video, December 16, 2021, retrieved December 20, 2021, 'DOJ would have to charge them,' Jennifer Rodgers says at the end of this interview.
  38. ^ Garcia, Katherine (December 20, 2021). "Report: Jan. 6 committee considering possibility of criminal referrals". The Week. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  39. ^ a b c Sneed, Tierney (December 29, 2021). "Trump wants Supreme Court to read Washington Post interview with Bennie Thompson". CNN. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  40. ^ Date, S.V. (January 16, 2022). "Reconstruction-Era Law Could Keep Trump Off The Ballot In 6 Southern States". HuffPost. Retrieved January 16, 2022.
  41. ^ Litman, Harry (January 21, 2022). "Opinion | Does Jan. 6 Disqualify Some Republicans From Re-election?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  42. ^ a b c d Boboitz, Sara (December 9, 2021). "Mark Meadows Did Not 'Properly' Turn Over Documents To National Archives". HuffPost. Retrieved December 10, 2021.
  43. ^ a b c d Gangel, Jamie; Cohen, Zachary (December 9, 2021). "January 6 committee gets Meadows texts, emails with 'wide range' of people while attack was underway". CNN. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  44. ^ a b Tapper, Jake; Gangel, Jamie (December 17, 2021). "CNN Exclusive: Jan 6 investigators believe Nov. 4 text pushing 'strategy' to undermine election came from Rick Perry". CNN. Retrieved December 20, 2021.
  45. ^ Nobles, Ryan; Grayer, Annie; Reid, Paula; Grimaldi, Angelica; Rogers, Alex (January 4, 2022). "January 6 committee seeks cooperation from Fox News' Hannity and releases texts between host and White House". CNN. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  46. ^ a b Cheney, Kyle; Wu, Nicholas (December 15, 2021). "Jim Jordan sent one of the texts to Mark Meadows highlighted this week by the Jan. 6 panel". Politico. Retrieved December 20, 2021.
  47. ^ a b Chowdhury, Maureen; Macaya, Melissa (December 13, 2021). "Live updates: House committee hearing on Mark Meadows". CNN. Retrieved December 20, 2021.
  48. ^ Swanson, Ian (December 15, 2021). "The Memo: Stunning texts offer new window into Jan. 6". The Hill. Retrieved December 19, 2021.
  49. ^ Windolf, Jim; Koblin, John (December 15, 2021). "Fox News Hosts Take the Offensive About Texts to Meadows". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 19, 2021.
  50. ^ Gangel, Jamie (January 3, 2022). "January 6 committee has 'firsthand' knowledge of Trump's behavior during the riot from multiple sources". CNN News. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  51. ^ Unknown (July 7, 2021). "Election Fraud, Foreign Interference & Options for 6 JAN - dated January 5, 2021" (PDF). ingersolllockwood.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 16, 2021. Retrieved December 16, 2021. PowerPoint document (36-page; January 5, 2021) (apparently, similar to a 38-page document, which "exists in varied forms on internet sites").
  52. ^ a b c Brown, Emma; Swaine, Jon; Alemany, Jacqueline; Dawsey, Josh; Hamburger, Tom (December 11, 2021). "Election denier who circulated Jan. 6 PowerPoint says he met with Meadows at White House". The Washington Post. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  53. ^ a b Broadwater, Luke; Feuer, Alan (December 10, 2021). "Jan. 6 Committee Examines PowerPoint Document Sent to Meadows - Mark Meadows's lawyer said the former White House chief of staff did not act on the document, which recommended that President Donald J. Trump declare a national emergency to keep himself in power". The New York Times. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  54. ^ a b Feuer, Alan (December 21, 2021). "A Retired Colonel's Unlikely Role in Pushing Baseless Election Claims". The New York Times.
  55. ^ a b Lowell, Hugo (December 10, 2021). "Capitol attack panel obtains PowerPoint that set out plan for Trump to stage coup - Presentation turned over by Mark Meadows made several recommendations for Trump to pursue to retain presidency". The Guardian. Retrieved December 20, 2021.
  56. ^ a b Unknown (July 7, 2021). "Election Fraud, Foreign Interference & Options for 6 JAN - dated January 5, 2021" (PDF). ingersolllockwood.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 16, 2021. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  57. ^ a b c Broadwater, Luke; Feuer, Alan (December 10, 2021). "Jan. 6 Committee Examines PowerPoint Document Sent to Meadows". The New York Times.
  58. ^ a b Brown, Emma; Swaine, Jon; Alemany, Jacqueline; Dawsey, Josh; Hamburger, Tom (December 11, 2021). "Election denier who circulated Jan. 6 PowerPoint says he met with Meadows at White House". The Washington Post.
  59. ^ a b Duda, Jeremy (February 3, 2021). "Fann picks Trump-allied firm with history of false election statements to audit Maricopa election". Arizona Mirror.
  60. ^ Roston, Ram; Heath, Brad; Shiffman, John; Eisler, Peter (December 15, 2021). "The military-intelligence veterans who helped lead Trump's campaign of disinformation". Reuters.
  61. ^ Pagliery, Jose (January 3, 2022). "Ex-National Archivist Thinks Trump Is Hiding His Records to Avoid 'Prison Time' - "There are things in those records that are going to make real trouble."". The Daily Beast. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  62. ^ a b Gonzalez, Oriana (January 21, 2022). "National Archives releases Trump White House records to Jan. 6 panel". Axios. Retrieved January 22, 2022.
  63. ^ a b Cooper, Anderson (January 21, 2022), George Conway on draft executive order: Absolute banana republic stuff - CNN Video, retrieved January 22, 2022
  64. ^ a b Wilkie, Christina (August 25, 2021). "Jan. 6 committee demands a huge trove of Trump White House records". CNBC.
  65. ^ a b Thompson, Bennie. "Letter to U.S. National Archives and Records Administration" (PDF). Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol. Retrieved August 25, 2021.
  66. ^ a b Ryan Nobles, Katelyn Polantz, Evan Perez and Paul LeBlanc. "Trump indicates he will try to assert executive privilege to prevent House investigators from getting information". CNN.((cite web)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  67. ^ a b c Hamburger, Tom; Alemany, Jacqueline; Dawsey, Josh (October 8, 2021). "Biden rejects Trump's request to withhold documents from House committee investigating Jan. 6 attack". The Washington Post.
  68. ^ a b Collinson, Stephen (October 26, 2021). "Analysis: Biden's refusal of executive privilege claim ignites new firestorm with Trump". CNN. Retrieved October 26, 2021.
  69. ^ a b Savage, Charlie (November 10, 2021). "Judge Rejects Trump's Bid to Keep Papers Secret in Jan. 6 Inquiry". The New York Times.
  70. ^ a b Rahman, Rema (December 9, 2021). "Appeals court rejects Trump effort to deny records to Jan. 6 panel". TheHill.
  71. ^ Ariane de Vogue; Katelyn Polantz (January 19, 2022). "Supreme Court clears the way for House to get Trump White House documents". CNN.
  72. ^ Zeke Miller (December 28, 2021). "White House, Jan. 6 committee agree to shield some documents". Associated Press.
  73. ^ a b Lowell, Hugo (October 6, 2021). "Top Trump aides set to defy subpoenas in Capitol attack investigation". The Guardian. Retrieved October 9, 2021.
  74. ^ a b Swan, Betsy Woodruff (October 7, 2021). "Trump tells 4 former aides to defy Jan. 6 committee's subpoena". Politico.
  75. ^ a b House, Billy; Parker, Mario (October 7, 2021). "Trump Instructs Former Aides to Defy Jan. 6 Panel Subpoenas". Bloomberg News.
  76. ^ a b Murray, Sara; Polantz, Katelyn; Nobles, Ryan (October 8, 2021). "Bannon to defy subpoena from January 6 committee, citing Trump's 'direction'". CNN. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  77. ^ a b Grayer, Annie (January 19, 2022). "A running list of who has received a subpoena from the House January 6 select committee". CNN. Retrieved January 19, 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  78. ^ Polantz, Katelyn (December 22, 2021). "Michael Flynn loses his legal challenge to the House January 6 probe, one day after filing it". CNN.
  79. ^ Orr, Gabby; Grayer, Annie (January 24, 2022). "Trump's team is directing allies to a January 6 legal defense fund". CNN. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  80. ^ a b c d e Melanie Zanona, Ryan Nobles and Lauren Fox. "Cheney and Kinzinger prepare for blockbuster hearing amid attacks from their own party". CNN. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  81. ^ a b "First Jan. 6 select committee hearing gives cops spotlight". Roll Call. July 26, 2021. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  82. ^ a b c d e Zachary Cohen and Marshall Cohen. "The January 6 select committee will hear from 4 police officers Tuesday. Here are their stories". CNN. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  83. ^ Kelsie Smith and Travis Caldwell. "Disturbing video shows officer crushed against door by mob attacking the Capitol". CNN. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  84. ^ a b c d "Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol to Hold First Hearing July 27th". Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol. July 20, 2021. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  85. ^ Zachary Cohen. "Exclusive: Newly obtained bodycam footage shows moment DC police officer attacked by pro-Trump rioters". CNN. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  86. ^ Paul LeBlanc and Caroline Kelly. "DC police officer: 'It's been very difficult' seeing elected officials trying to whitewash brutal insurrection". CNN. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  87. ^ Zachary Cohen, Ryan Nobles, Annie Grayer and Whitney Wild. "House committee plans to seek phone records in probe of January 6, including from members of Congress". CNN.((cite web)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  88. ^ Breuninger, Kevin; Wilkie, Christina (August 27, 2021). "Congressional panel investigating Jan. 6 insurrection demands records from Facebook, Twitter, other tech firms". CNBC. Retrieved August 30, 2021.
  89. ^ Lowell, Hugo (September 1, 2021). "Capitol riot inquiry to investigate whether Trump's White House was involved in attack". Guardian US. Retrieved September 1, 2021.
  90. ^ Lowell, Hugo (September 13, 2021). "Trump's White House chief of staff is target of Capitol attack records request". The Guardian. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  91. ^ Lowell, Hugo (September 22, 2021). "Capitol attack panel said to be considering subpoenas to Trump White House aides". Guardian US. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  92. ^ "Jan. 6 committee subpoenas four from Trump's inner circle". POLITICO.
  93. ^ Ryan Nobles, Zachary Cohen and Annie Grayer. "House committee investigating January 6 can't find Trump aide to serve subpoena". CNN.
  94. ^ Boboltz, Sara (October 7, 2021). "Trump Told 4 Officials To Ignore Jan. 6 Committee Subpoena: Report". HuffPost. Retrieved October 7, 2021.
  95. ^ Alemany, Jacqueline; Meyer, Theodoric (October 12, 2021). "We still don't know if Mark Meadows and Kash Patel will comply with Jan. 6 subpoenas". Washington Post. Retrieved October 18, 2021.
  96. ^ a b c Zachary Cohen and Annie Grayer (November 12, 2021). "Mark Meadows did not appear for deposition with January 6 committee". CNN.
  97. ^ Annie Grayer, Ryan Nobles, Whitney Wild and Zachary Cohen. "January 6 committee targets organizers of Stop the Steal rally in latest batch of subpoenas". CNN.((cite web)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  98. ^ Grayer, Annie; Cohen, Zachary; Nobles, Ryan; Wild, Whitney (October 7, 2021). "January 6 committee issues new subpoenas for 2 leaders of 'Stop the Steal' group". CNN. Retrieved October 7, 2021.
  99. ^ Lowell, Hugo (October 7, 2021). "House Capitol attack panel subpoenas key planners of 'Stop the Steal' rally". The Guardian. Retrieved October 9, 2021.
  100. ^ Nobles, Ryan; Polantz, Katelyn; Perez, Evan; LeBlanc, Paul (October 7, 2021). "Trump indicates he will try to assert executive privilege to prevent House investigators from getting information". CNN. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  101. ^ Perez, Evan (October 8, 2021). "Biden refuses to assert privilege over Trump documents sought by January 6 committee". CNN. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  102. ^ Collins, Kaitlan (October 13, 2021). "White House rejects Trump's latest executive privilege request". CNN.
  103. ^ "Second Letter from Dana A. Remus, Counsel to the President, to David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, dated October 8, 2021". The White House. October 13, 2021.
  104. ^ Annie Grayer, Ryan Nobles, Zachary Cohen and Whitney Wild. "January 6 committee subpoenas former DOJ official who pushed election fraud lie, plans to interview another who pushed back". CNN.((cite web)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  105. ^ Swan, Betsy Woodruff. "Rosen, former acting AG under Trump, appears before Jan. 6 committee". POLITICO.
  106. ^ Cohen, Zachary; Polantz, Katelyn; Nobles, Ryan; Grayer, Annie; Wild, Whitney (October 14, 2021). "January 6 panel moves to hold Steve Bannon in criminal contempt". CNN. Retrieved October 14, 2021.
  107. ^ a b Nicholas Wu; Kyle Cheney; Betsy Woodruff Swan; Meridith McGraw (October 8, 2021). "Biden White House waives executive privilege for initial set of Trump-era documents sought by Jan. 6 panel". Politico.
  108. ^ Nobles, Ryan; Cohen, Zachary; Grayer, Annie (October 6, 2021). "House committee investigating January 6 can't find Trump aide to serve subpoena". CNN. Retrieved October 9, 2021.
  109. ^ Haberman, Maggie; Broadwater, Luke (October 8, 2021). "Jan. 6 Panel Threatens to Pursue Charges Against Bannon" – via NYTimes.com.
  110. ^ Nobles, Ryan; Grayer, Annie; Wild, Whitney; Cohen, Zachary (October 14, 2021). "Jan. 6 committee agrees to postpone appearances by Meadows, Patel and Scavino". CNN. Retrieved October 16, 2021.
  111. ^ Alemany, Jacqueline (October 18, 2021). "Trump sues to block records requested by Jan. 6 committee". Washington Post. Retrieved October 18, 2021.
  112. ^ "DONALD J. TRUMP v. BENNIE G. THOMPSON, U.S. HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE, DAVID S. FERRIERO, and THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION, Case 1:21-cv-02769 Filed 10/18/21" (PDF). storage.courtlistener.com. October 18, 2021. Retrieved October 18, 2021.
  113. ^ Sneed, Tierney (October 20, 2021). "Hurry up and wait: Trump's best legal shot at blocking the release of his January 6 docs". CNN. Retrieved October 20, 2021.
  114. ^ Macaya, Melissa (October 19, 2021). "Jan. 6 committee vote to approve Steve Bannon criminal contempt report: Live updates". CNN.
  115. ^ Lowell, Hugo (October 21, 2021). "House holds Trump ally Steve Bannon in criminal contempt of Congress". the Guardian. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  116. ^ Foran, Clare; Cohen, Zachary; Nobles, Ryan (October 21, 2021). "House votes to hold Steve Bannon in contempt for defying subpoena". CNN. Retrieved October 21, 2021.
  117. ^ Collinson, Stephen (October 15, 2021). "Analysis: January 6 committee exposes a dark truth in going after Bannon". CNN. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  118. ^ Katelyn Polantz; Ryan Nobles; Paula Reid; Zachary Cohen (October 22, 2021). "Former DOJ official who pushed baseless election fraud claims expected to testify before January 6 committee". CNN.
  119. ^ Alemany, Jacqueline (October 26, 2021). "Jan. 6 committee expected to subpoena lawyer who advised Trump, Pence on how to overturn election". Washington Post. Retrieved October 27, 2021.
  120. ^ Honig, Ellie (October 27, 2021), "'Completely damning' video of Trump ally emerges – CNN Video", CNN, retrieved October 27, 2021
  121. ^ a b Betsy Woodruff Swan (October 27, 2021). "Former DOJ official splits with lawyer before Jan. 6 testimony". Politico.
  122. ^ "Trump wants call logs, aide's notes hidden from Jan. 6 panel". AP NEWS. October 30, 2021.
  123. ^ Betsy Woodruff Swan; Kyle Cheney (November 5, 2021). "Trump DOJ official who aided effort to overturn election declines to answer Jan. 6 questions". Politico.
  124. ^ Zachary Cohen; Katelyn Polantz (November 5, 2021). "Trump Justice official who pushed election fraud claims stonewalls House January 6 committee". CNN.
  125. ^ Lowell, Hugo (November 6, 2021). "House 6 January panel to issue new round of subpoenas for Trump allies". the Guardian. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  126. ^ Lowell, Hugo (November 8, 2021). "Lawyer John Eastman and Michael Flynn among six subpoenaed by Capitol attack panel". the Guardian. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  127. ^ a b Zachary Cohen; Ryan Nobles; Annie Grayer (November 8, 2021). "January 6 committee issues 6 subpoenas to top Trump campaign associates". CNN.
  128. ^ Broadwater, Luke (November 9, 2021). "House Inquiry Into Jan. 6 Issues 10 New Subpoenas". The New York Times.
  129. ^ Mangan, Dan (November 9, 2021). "Trump press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, Stephen Miller and other White House officials subpoenaed in Jan. 6 House probe". CNBC.
  130. ^ Grayer, Annie; Cohen, Zachary; Nobles, Ryan; Wild, Whitney (November 9, 2021). "January 6 committee issues 10 more subpoenas including to Stephen Miller". CNN. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  131. ^ "Trump loses bid to keep Jan. 6 records from House committee investigating riot". NBC News.
  132. ^ Kyle Cheney (November 9, 2021). "Trump makes — and loses — overnight bid to block Jan. 6 investigators". Politico.
  133. ^ Katelyn Polantz (November 9, 2021). "Judge denies Trump's overnight request for injunction in executive privilege case, still needs to rule on main case". CNN.
  134. ^ Jansen, Bart (November 9, 2021). "Trump appeals after federal judge refuses to withhold records from January 6 committee". USA Today.
  135. ^ Katelyn Polantz (November 10, 2021). "Judge rejects another Trump attempt to slow down documents from going to House January 6 committee". CNN.
  136. ^ Kyle Cheney; Josh Gerstein (November 11, 2021). "Appeals court slows Jan. 6 committee's effort to access Trump White House records". Politico.
  137. ^ a b Hannah Rabinowitz; Jessica Schneider; Evan Perez; Paula Reid; Zachary Cohen (November 12, 2021). "Federal grand jury indicts former Trump adviser Steve Bannon for contempt of Congress". CNN.
  138. ^ Cohen, Zachary; Duster, Chandelis (November 15, 2021). "Trump ally Steve Bannon surrenders after his indictment on two counts of contempt of Congress". CNN. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  139. ^ a b c Tom Hamburger and Jacqueline Alemany (November 22, 2021). "Roger Stone and Alex Jones subpoenaed by House committee investigating Jan. 6 attack on Capitol by pro-Trump mob". The Washington Post.
  140. ^ Lowell, Hugo (November 22, 2021). "Roger Stone and Alex Jones among five to receive Capitol attack subpoenas". the Guardian. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  141. ^ Lowell, Hugo (November 23, 2021). "House Capitol attack committee subpoenas far-right leaders and groups". the Guardian. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  142. ^ a b c d e f Cohen, Marshall (November 23, 2021). "January 6 committee subpoenas Proud Boys and Oath Keepers". CNN.
  143. ^ Polantz, Katelyn (November 24, 2021). "Trump argues January 6 committee could damage the presidency in quest for his records". CNN. Retrieved November 24, 2021.
  144. ^ Sneed, Tierney; Polantz, Katelyn (November 30, 2021). "Takeaways from the appeals court hearing in the January 6 Trump documents case". CNN. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  145. ^ Lowell, Hugo (November 30, 2021). "Trump called aides hours before Capitol riot to discuss how to stop Biden victory". The Guardian.
  146. ^ Jacqueline Alemany; Emma Brown; Tom Hamburger; Jon Swaine (October 23, 2021). "Ahead of Jan. 6, Willard hotel in downtown D.C. was a Trump team 'command center' for effort to deny Biden the presidency". The Washington Post.
  147. ^ Luke Broadwater; Mark Mazzetti (November 9, 2021). "At the Willard and the White House, the Jan. 6 Panel Widens Its Net". The New York Times.
  148. ^ Lowell, Hugo (December 2, 2021). "Capitol attack panel recommends contempt prosecution for Jeffrey Clark". the Guardian. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  149. ^ Grayer, Annie; Nobles, Ryan; Cohen, Zachary; Wild, Whitney (December 1, 2021). "January 6 committee moves to hold former DOJ official in contempt but also gives him one last chance to cooperate". CNN. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  150. ^ Nobles, Ryan; Cohen, Zachary; Grayer, Annie (December 4, 2021). "Jeffrey Clark's deposition postponed until December 16". CNN. Retrieved December 5, 2021.
  151. ^ Woodruff Swan, Betsy; McGraw, Meridith (December 6, 2021). "'Absolute liars': Ex-D.C. Guard official says generals lied to Congress about Jan. 6". POLITICO. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
  152. ^ "Read: Mark Meadows' letter to January 6 committee". CNN. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  153. ^ a b Borger, Gloria; Cohen, Zachary (December 7, 2021). "Mark Meadows to halt cooperation with January 6 committee". CNN. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  154. ^ Annie Grayer; Zachary Cohen (December 8, 2021). "January 6 committee says it is moving forward with criminal contempt for Meadows". CNN.
  155. ^ a b Zachary Cohen; Jamie Gangel; Katelyn Polantz; Ryan Nobles (December 7, 2021). "January 6 committee casts a wide net with over 100 subpoenas for phone records". CNN.
  156. ^ Grayer, Annie; Cohen, Zachary (December 8, 2021). "January 6 committee says it is moving forward with criminal contempt for Meadows". CNN. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
  157. ^ Sneed, Tierney (December 8, 2021). "Mark Meadows sues House January 6 committee". CNN.
  158. ^ Lowell, Hugo. "Latest: Trump White House chief Mark Meadows turned over to Jan. 6 committee an email that referred to a PowerPoint calling for Trump to declare a NatSec emergency and have VP Pence delay Biden's certification". Twitter. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  159. ^ "Mark Meadows Hands Over PowerPoint Plan For Trump To Overthrow Election". HuffPost. December 11, 2021. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  160. ^ Lowell, Hugo (December 11, 2021). "Capitol attack panel obtains PowerPoint that set out plan for Trump to stage coup". the Guardian. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  161. ^ Bort, Ryan (December 9, 2021). "Trump's White House Emailed About a PowerPoint on How to End American Democracy". Rolling Stone. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  162. ^ Cohen, Zachary; LeBlanc, Paul; McCullough, Colin (December 13, 2021). "Meadows said National Guard would be ready to 'protect pro Trump people' before Capitol insurrection, House investigators say". CNN. Retrieved December 13, 2021.
  163. ^ Broadwater, Luke (December 12, 2021). "Meadows Was Deeply Involved in Fighting Election Outcome, Jan. 6 Panel Says". The New York Times.
  164. ^ Alemany, Jacqueline; Brown, Emma; Hamburger, Tom; Swaine, Jon (October 23, 2021). "Ahead of Jan. 6, Willard hotel in downtown D.C. was a Trump team 'command center' for effort to deny Biden the presidency". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 23, 2021.
  165. ^ Lowell, Hugo (December 14, 2021). "Capitol attack panel recommends criminal prosecution for Mark Meadows". the Guardian. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  166. ^ Maureen Chowdhury; Adrienne Vogt; Melissa Macaya; Mike Hayes; Meg Wagner (December 14, 2021). "House votes to hold Mark Meadows in contempt of Congress". CNN.
  167. ^ Jeremy Herb; Ryan Nobles (December 14, 2021). "'Need to end this call': January 6 committee reveals new text messages to Meadows on House floor". CNN.
  168. ^ Miller, Zeke (December 28, 2021). "White House And Jan. 6 Committee Agree To Shield Some Documents". HuffPost. Retrieved December 29, 2021.
  169. ^ Lowell, Hugo (December 16, 2021). "Capitol attack panel subpoenas author of PowerPoint plan for coup". the Guardian. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  170. ^ Grisales, Claudia (December 17, 2021). "Roger Stone appears before Jan. 6 panel and pleads the Fifth". NPR. Retrieved December 17, 2021.
  171. ^ Zachary Cohen; Annie Grayer (December 20, 2021). "January 6 committee sends letter to GOP Rep. Scott Perry, asking to interview him". CNN.
  172. ^ Thompson, Bennie G. (December 20, 2021). "Letter to Representative Scott Perry" (PDF). House Select Committee on the January 6 Attack.
  173. ^ Benner, Katie; Edmondson, Catie (January 23, 2021). "Pennsylvania Lawmaker Played Key Role in Trump's Plot to Oust Acting Attorney General". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  174. ^ Annie Grayer; Zachary Cohen (December 21, 2021). "GOP Rep. Scott Perry declines January 6 committee's request to speak with him". CNN.
  175. ^ Jeremy Herb and Ryan Nobles. "January 6 committee reveals new Meadows text message on House floor". CNN. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  176. ^ Beth Reinhard; Mariana Alfaro (December 22, 2021). "Long before embracing Trump's false election claims, Rep. Scott Perry promoted groundless theories". The Washington Post.
  177. ^ Zachary Cohen; Annie Grayer (December 22, 2021). "House committee seeks to interview GOP firebrand Rep. Jim Jordan about January 6". CNN.
  178. ^ Bennie Thompson (December 22, 2021). "Letter to Jim Jordan" (PDF). House Select Committee on the January 6 Attack.
  179. ^ Sneed, Tierney; Polantz, Katelyn (December 23, 2021). "Trump asks Supreme Court to block release of his White House records to January 6 committee". CNN. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  180. ^ "Trump v. Thompson Petition". www.documentcloud.org. December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  181. ^ "21A272 Trump v. Thompson Application". www.documentcloud.org. December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  182. ^ Wolfe, Jan (December 25, 2021). "Trump spokesman says he has cooperated with U.S. House panel probing Jan. 6" – via www.reuters.com.
  183. ^ Lowell, Hugo (December 27, 2021). "Capitol panel to investigate Trump call to Willard hotel in hours before attack". The Guardian.
  184. ^ Wu, Nicholas; Cheney, Kyle (December 31, 2021). "Bernard Kerik provides batch of documents to Jan. 6 select committee". Politico. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  185. ^ Collinson, Stephen (January 5, 2022). "Analysis: Call for Pence cooperation shows ambition of January 6 panel ahead of anniversary". CNN. Retrieved January 5, 2022.
  186. ^ Jamie Gangel; Michael Warren; Ryan Nobles (December 6, 2021). "CNN Exclusive: Top Pence aide cooperating with January 6 committee". CNN.
  187. ^ Mary Clare Jalonick; Jill Colvin (December 6, 2021). "Pence's former top aide cooperating with Jan. 6 panel". Associated Press.
  188. ^ Lowell, Hugo (January 8, 2022). "Capitol attack panel investigates Trump over potential criminal conspiracy". The Guardian.
  189. ^ Timsit, Annabelle (January 10, 2022). "Rep. Jim Jordan refuses to cooperate with Jan. 6 committee investigating Capitol attack". Washington Post. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  190. ^ Wu, Nicholas (January 10, 2022). "Jan. 6 panel ramps up investigation into Trump's state-level pressure". Politico.
  191. ^ Michael S. Schmidt; Alan Feuer (January 10, 2022). "Pence and Jan. 6 Committee Engage in High-Stakes Dance Over Testimony". The New York Times.
  192. ^ Zachary Cohen; Annie Grayer; Ryan Nobles (January 12, 2022). "January 6 committee asks McCarthy to voluntarily provide information to probe". CNN.
  193. ^ Herb, Jeremy (May 18, 2021). "McCarthy won't support January 6 commission and sides with Republicans downplaying the insurrection". CNN.
  194. ^ Neidzwadek, Nick (January 13, 2021). "McCarthy says Trump 'bears responsibility' for Capitol riot". Politico.
  195. ^ Devon M. Sayers; Jamie Gangel; Ryan Nobles (January 28, 2021). "McCarthy and Trump discuss Republicans' plans to win House majority at Florida meeting Thursday". CNN.
  196. ^ Andrew Kaczynski; Melanie Zanona (January 14, 2022). "In days after January 6, McCarthy said Trump admitted bearing some responsibility for Capitol attack". CNN.
  197. ^ Zachary Cohen; Annie Grayer; Ryan Nobles (January 22, 2022). "McCarthy says he will not cooperate with January 6 committee probe". CNN.
  198. ^ Zachary Cohen; Marshall Cohen (January 12, 2022). "Trump allies' fake Electoral College certificates offer fresh insights about plot to overturn Biden's victory". CNN.
  199. ^ "American Oversight obtains seven phony certificates of pro-Trump electors". American Oversight. March 2, 2021.
  200. ^ Eggert, David (January 14, 2022). "Michigan AG asks feds to investigate fake GOP electors". Associated Press.
  201. ^ Ariane de Vogue; Katelyn Polantz (January 19, 2022). "Supreme Court clears the way for House to get Trump White House documents". CNN.
  202. ^ "Trump v. Thompson" (PDF). U.S. Supreme Court. January 19, 2022. Retrieved January 19, 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  203. ^ Grayer, Annie (January 20, 2022). "January 6 committee asks Ivanka Trump to talk with them". CNN.
  204. ^ Thompson, Bennie (January 20, 2022). "Letter to Ivanka Trump" (PDF). january6th.house.gov. Retrieved January 20, 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  205. ^ Daniella Diaz; Chandelis Duster (January 23, 2022). "January 6 committee has been talking with ex-attorney general William Barr, chairman says". CNN.
  206. ^ Matt Zapotosky; Josh Dawsey; Devlin Barrett (December 2, 2020). "Trump is said to be livid at Barr, with one official suggesting termination possible". The Washington Post.
  207. ^ Allie Malloy; Devan Cole; Christina Carrega; Kevin Liptak (December 15, 2020). "Attorney General William Barr resigns". CNN.
  208. ^ Polantz, Katelyn (January 24, 2022). "Trump lawyer ordered to respond to January 6 committee subpoena for his Chapman University emails". CNN.
  209. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac Bump, Philip (November 10, 2021). "Analysis | Who's who in the Jan. 6 committee subpoenas". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  210. ^ Zachary Cohen; Jamie Gangel; Katelyn Polantz; Ryan Nobles (December 7, 2021). "January 6 committee casts a wide net with over 100 subpoenas for phone records". CNN.
  211. ^ a b Polantz, Katelyn (December 22, 2021). "Michael Flynn loses his legal challenge to the House January 6 probe, one day after filing it". CNN. Retrieved December 22, 2021.
  212. ^ "Meet the Press - January 2, 2022". NBC News. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  213. ^ Grayer, Annie; Cohen, Zachary; Gangel, Jamie; Nobles, Ryan (November 30, 2021). "Exclusive: Meadows reaches deal for initial cooperation with January 6 investigators". CNN. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  214. ^ Tierney Sneed and Ryan Nobles. "Mark Meadows sues House January 6 committee". CNN. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  215. ^ Nobles, Ryan (October 28, 2021). "Key Trump allies granted postponements by January 6 committee". CNN. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  216. ^ Grisales, Claudia (October 15, 2021). "Jan. 6 panel moves forward with criminal contempt charge against Steve Bannon". NPR. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  217. ^ Jim Saksa and Chris Marquette (October 14, 2021). "Kashyap Patel ditches Jan. 6 deposition". Roll Call.
  218. ^ a b Schwartz, Brian (October 26, 2021). "Pro-Trump group that helped organize Jan. 6 rally is raising money for its legal defense as it faces House probe". CNBC. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  219. ^ "Subpoena for Stop the Steal LLC" (PDF). January 6th House Committee. October 7, 2021. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  220. ^ Mary Clare Jalonick (November 29, 2021). "Jan. 6 panel sets contempt vote for former DOJ official". Associated Press.
  221. ^ Cheney, Kyle (December 3, 2021). "Eastman takes the Fifth with Jan. 6 committee". Politico.
  222. ^ a b Nobles, Ryan (December 6, 2021). "January 6 committee postpones depositions with Michael Flynn and Trump's personal assistant". CNN. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  223. ^ Legare, Robert (December 22, 2021). "Former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn sues January 6 committee over subpoenas". www.cbsnews.com. Retrieved December 22, 2021.
  224. ^ Maddow, Rachel (November 9, 2021), New Round Of Trump Insiders Subpoenaed By January 6th Committee (MSNBC), retrieved January 24, 2022
  225. ^ Grayer, Annie (January 13, 2022). "January 6 committee meets with former NYC police commissioner Bernard Kerik for eight hours". CNN.
  226. ^ Gangel, Jamie (January 3, 2022). "January 6 committee has 'firsthand' knowledge of Trump's behavior during the riot from multiple sources". CNN. Retrieved January 3, 2022.
  227. ^ Grayer, Annie; Nobles, Ryan (January 12, 2022). "Former White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany met with January 6 committee, sources say". CNN. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  228. ^ Zachary Cohen; Holmes Lybrand (December 17, 2021). "Trump ally Roger Stone pleads the Fifth in deposition with January 6 committee". CNN.
  229. ^ a b c Zachary Cohen; Ryan Nobles; Annie Grayer; Whitney Wild (November 22, 2021). "5 new January 6 committee subpoenas issued". CNN.
  230. ^ Wolfe, Jan (December 25, 2021). "Trump spokesman says he has cooperated with U.S. House panel probing Jan. 6" – via www.reuters.com.
  231. ^ a b c d Cohen, Zachary; Grayer, Annie; Nobles, Ryan (January 11, 2022). "January 6 panel subpoenas former White House official who helped draft Trump speech". CNN. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  232. ^ Cohen, Marshall (November 24, 2021). "What is the 1st Amendment Praetorian, the obscure far-right group subpoenaed by the January 6 committee?". CNN.
  233. ^ a b c d e f Dartunorro Clark; Haley Talbot; Leigh Ann Caldwell (December 10, 2021). "Jan. 6 committee subpoenas two former White House aides who met with Trump before rally". NBC News.
  234. ^ a b c d e f Zachary Cohen; Annie Grayer; Ryan Nobles; Whitney Wild (December 10, 2021). "January 6 committee subpoenas Trump-backed congressional candidate". CNN.
  235. ^ Date, S.V. (December 17, 2021). "House Jan. 6 Committee Subpoenas 'Coup PowerPoint' Author". HuffPost. Retrieved December 17, 2021.
  236. ^ a b Annie Grayer; Ryan Nobles; Zachary Cohen (January 13, 2022). "January 6 panel targets social media companies with subpoenas after 'inadequate responses' to voluntary request". CNN.
  237. ^ a b c d Dareh Gregorian; Haley Talbot (January 18, 2022). "Jan. 6 committee subpoenas Giuliani, 3 other Trump lawyers, accuses them of pushing election lies". NBC News.
  238. ^ "Letter to Rudy Giuliani" (PDF). January 6 Committee. January 18, 2022.
  239. ^ "Letter to Sidney Powell" (PDF). January 6 Committee. January 18, 2022.
  240. ^ "Letter to Jenna Ellis" (PDF). January 6 Committee. January 18, 2022.
  241. ^ "Letter to Boris Epshteyn" (PDF). January 6 Committee. January 18, 2022.
  242. ^ a b Jamie Gangel; Jeremy Herb; Elizabeth Stuart (January 18, 2022). "Exclusive: Eric Trump and Kimberly Guilfoyle's phone records subpoenaed by January 6 committee". CNN.
  243. ^ Jamie Gangel; Jeremy Herb; Elizabeth Stuart (January 18, 2022). "Exclusive: Eric Trump and Kimberly Guilfoyle's phone records subpoenaed by January 6 committee". CNN.
  244. ^ Jamie Gangel; Jeremy Herb; Elizabeth Stuart (January 18, 2022). "Exclusive: Eric Trump and Kimberly Guilfoyle's phone records subpoenaed by January 6 committee". CNN.
  245. ^ a b Annie Grayer; Zachary Cohen (January 19, 2022). "January 6 committee subpoenas 2 people who promoted election fraud conspiracy theories". CNN.
  246. ^ "Letter to Nicholas Fuentes" (PDF). January 6 Committee. January 19, 2022.
  247. ^ "Letter to Patrick Casey" (PDF). January 6 Committee. January 19, 2022.
  248. ^ Solender, Andrew. "McCarthy Threatens Committee Assignments Of Members Who Take Jan. 6 Committee Seat From Pelosi". Forbes. Retrieved July 4, 2021.
  249. ^ a b Ryan Nobles and Melanie Zanona. "Growing group of GOP members wants McCarthy to punish Kinzinger and Cheney for joining January 6 committee". CNN. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  250. ^ a b c Melanie Zanona and Manu Raju. "'What you're doing is unprecedented': McCarthy-Pelosi feud boils over". CNN. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  251. ^ The Editorial Board (July 21, 2021). "Opinion | Pelosi Blows Up Her Jan. 6 Committee". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved July 22, 2021.
  252. ^ Chronicle Editorial Board (July 22, 2021). "Editorial: Nancy Pelosi didn't go far enough in rejecting GOP members from 1/6 committee". San Francisco Chronicle. Archived from the original on July 23, 2021.
  253. ^ Alemany, Jacqueline; Sotomayor, Marianna; Wagner, John (July 27, 2021). "Republicans voice opposition to Jan. 6 investigation as police officers call for accountability". Washington Post. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  254. ^ Sonmez, Felicia; Lima, Cristiano (September 1, 2021). "Rep. McCarthy threatens tech and telecom firms that comply with Jan.6 committee's request". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on September 1, 2021. Retrieved September 2, 2021.
  255. ^ Papenfuss, Mary (September 3, 2021). "Watchdog Demands Probe Of Kevin McCarthy's Threats Against Firms In Jan. 6 Investigation". HuffPost. Retrieved September 4, 2021.
  256. ^ Solender, Andrew. "Ethics Watchdog Requests Probe Into Kevin McCarthy, Marjorie Taylor Greene For 'Threatening' Telecom Firms". Forbes.
  257. ^ Slisco, Aila (September 3, 2021). "11 House Republicans back up Kevin McCarthy's threat to telecoms over 1/6 Committee". Newsweek.
  258. ^ Broadwater, Luke; Rosenberg, Matthew (January 29, 2021). "Republican Ties to Extremist Groups Are Under Scrutiny" – via NYTimes.com.
  259. ^ Edmondson, Catie; Broadwater, Luke (January 12, 2021). "Trump loyalists in Congress fanned flames before Capitol riot" – via NYTimes.com.
  260. ^ "Rep. Kevin McCarthy discusses Afghanistan, Capitol riot probe". September 3, 2021.
  261. ^ Ryan Nobles and Daniella Diaz. "January 6 select committee refutes claim by McCarthy that the Justice Department cleared Trump of any role in insurrection". CNN.
  262. ^ "Exclusive: FBI finds scant evidence U.S. Capitol attack was coordinated – sources". Reuters. August 21, 2021.
  263. ^ MSNBC (October 16, 2021). Rick Wilson: An Unpunished Coup Is A Training Exercise. YouTube. Google, LLC. Event occurs at 2:12. Retrieved October 17, 2021.
  264. ^ O'Connor, Lydia (December 21, 2021). "Scott Perry Says He's Refusing To Comply With Jan. 6 Investigation". HuffPost. Retrieved December 21, 2021.
  265. ^ Campbell, Andy (January 24, 2022). "Republicans Mock Newt Gingrich Over Threat Of 'Jail' For Jan. 6 Panel". HuffPost. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  266. ^ Tribe, Laurence H.; Ayer, Donald; Aftergut, Dennis (December 23, 2021). "Will Donald Trump Get Away With Inciting an Insurrection". The New York Times. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  267. ^ "A majority of Americans support a congressional Jan. 6 investigation". MSNBC. July 28, 2021. Retrieved July 28, 2021.
  268. ^ Niedzwiadek, Nick (January 2, 2022). "Poll: House's Jan. 6 probe is popular — even among many Republicans". POLITICO. Retrieved January 21, 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  269. ^ Manchester, Julia (August 2, 2021). "58 percent say Jan. 6 House committee is biased: poll". TheHill. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  270. ^ "Declining Share of Republicans Say It Is Important To Prosecute Jan. 6 Rioters". Pew Research Center – U.S. Politics & Policy. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  271. ^ Lowell, Hugo (December 10, 2021). "Capitol attack panel obtains PowerPoint that set out plan for Trump to stage coup - Presentation turned over by Mark Meadows made several recommendations for Trump to pursue to retain presidency". The Guardian. Retrieved December 20, 2021.