Texas's congressional districts since 2023

These are tables of congressional delegations from the State of Texas to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives.

The current deans of the Texas delegation are Representatives Sheila Jackson Lee (TX-18) and Lloyd Doggett (TX-37), having both served in the House since 1995.

Republicans have complete control of the congressional redistricting process in Texas, as any new maps are drawn and passed by the Republican-held state legislature and signed into law by the Republican governor.[1] This has resulted in Texas’ maps being a partisan gerrymander, with few competitive districts.[2][3]

U.S. House of Representatives

Main article: List of United States representatives from Texas

Current districts and representatives

The delegation consists of 38 members, with 25 Republicans and 13 Democrats.


Current U.S. representatives from Texas
District Member
(Residence)[4]
Party Incumbent since CPVI
(2022)[5]
District map
1st
Nathaniel Moran
(Whitehouse)
Republican January 3, 2023 R+26
2nd
Dan Crenshaw
(Humble)
Republican January 3, 2019 R+15
3rd
Keith Self
(McKinney)
Republican January 3, 2023 R+11
4th
Pat Fallon
(Frisco)
Republican January 3, 2021 R+16
5th
Lance Gooden
(Terrell)
Republican January 3, 2019 R+14
6th
Jake Ellzey
(Midlothian)
Republican July 30, 2021 R+15
7th
Lizzie Fletcher
(Houston)
Democratic January 3, 2019 D+13
8th
Morgan Luttrell
(Magnolia)
Republican January 3, 2023 R+16
9th
Al Green
(Houston)
Democratic January 3, 2005 D+26
10th
Michael McCaul
(Austin)
Republican January 3, 2005 R+13
11th
August Pfluger
(San Angelo)
Republican January 3, 2021 R+23
12th
Kay Granger
(Fort Worth)
Republican January 3, 1997 R+12
13th
Ronny Jackson
(Amarillo)
Republican January 3, 2021 R+26
14th
Randy Weber
(Friendswood)
Republican January 3, 2013 R+17
15th
Monica De La Cruz
(Edinburg)
Republican January 3, 2023 R+1
16th
Veronica Escobar
(El Paso)
Democratic January 3, 2019 D+17
17th
Pete Sessions
(Waco)
Republican January 3, 2021 R+14
18th
Sheila Jackson Lee
(Houston)
Democratic January 3, 1995 D+23
19th
Jodey Arrington
(Lubbock)
Republican January 3, 2017 R+26
20th
Joaquin Castro
(San Antonio)
Democratic January 3, 2013 D+15
21st
Chip Roy
(Austin)
Republican January 3, 2019 R+13
22nd
Troy Nehls
(Richmond)
Republican January 3, 2021 R+11
23rd
Tony Gonzales
(San Antonio)
Republican January 3, 2021 R+5
24th
Beth Van Duyne
(Irving)
Republican January 3, 2021 R+10
25th
Roger Williams
(Weatherford)
Republican January 3, 2013 R+19
26th
Michael Burgess
(Pilot Point)
Republican January 3, 2003 R+13
27th
Michael Cloud
(Victoria)
Republican July 10, 2018 R+13
28th
Henry Cuellar
(Laredo)
Democratic January 3, 2005 D+3
29th
Sylvia Garcia
(Houston)
Democratic January 3, 2019 D+18
30th
Jasmine Crockett
(Dallas)
Democratic January 3, 2023 D+27
31st
John Carter
(Round Rock)
Republican January 3, 2003 R+14
32nd
Colin Allred
(Dallas)
Democratic January 3, 2019 D+14
33rd
Marc Veasey
(Fort Worth)
Democratic January 3, 2013 D+24
34th
Vicente Gonzalez
(McAllen)
Democratic January 3, 2017 D+9
35th
Greg Casar
(Austin)
Democratic January 3, 2023 D+21
36th
Brian Babin
(Woodville)
Republican January 3, 2015 R+18
37th
Lloyd Doggett
(Austin)
Democratic January 3, 1995 D+24
38th
Wesley Hunt
(Houston)
Republican January 3, 2023 R+12

Recent historical district boundaries

Below is a table of United States congressional district boundary maps for the State of Texas, presented chronologically.[6] All 10 redistricting events that took place in Texas in the decades between 1973 and 2013 are illustrated here.

Year Statewide map
1973–1975
1975–1983
1983–1985
1985–1993
1993–1997
1997–2003
2003–2005
2005–2007
2007–2013
2013 – 2023
2023– Present

1845 to 1863: 2 seats

Upon statehood, Texas was apportioned two seats.

Congress 1st district 2nd district
29th (1845–1847) David S. Kaufman (D) Timothy Pilsbury (D)
30th (1847–1849)
31st (1849–1851) Volney Howard (D)
32nd (1851–1853) Richardson A. Scurry (D)
33rd (1853–1855) George W. Smyth (D) Peter Hansborough Bell (D)
34th (1855–1857) Lemuel D. Evans (KN)
35th (1857–1859) John H. Reagan (D) Guy M. Bryan (D)
36th (1859–1861) Andrew Jackson Hamilton (ID)
37th (1861–1863) American Civil War

1863 to 1873: 4 seats

After the 1860 United States census, Texas gained two seats.

Congress 1st district 2nd district 3rd district 4th district
38, 39, 40th (1863–1869) American Civil War
41st (1869–1871)
George W. Whitmore (R) John C. Conner (D) William Thomas
Clark
(R)
Edward Degener (R)
42nd (1871–1873) William S. Herndon (D) John Hancock (D)
D. C. Giddings (D)

1873 to 1883: 6 seats

After the 1870 United States census, Texas gained two seats. At first, the state used at-large seats, but after 1875 all the seats were districted.

Congress 1st district 2nd district 3rd district 4th district At-large seat A At-large seat B
43rd (1873–1875) William S. Herndon (D) William P. McLean (D) D. C. Giddings (D) John Hancock (D) Roger Q. Mills (D) Asa H. Willie (D)
44th (1875–1877) John H. Reagan (D) David B.
Culberson
(D)
James W.
Throckmorton
(D)
Roger Q. Mills (D) 5th district 6th district
John Hancock (D) Gustav Schleicher (D)
45th (1877–1879) D. C. Giddings (D)
46th (1879–1881) Olin Wellborn (D) George Washington
Jones
(GB)
Christopher C.
Upson
(D)
47th (1881–1883)

1883 to 1893: 11 seats

After the 1880 United States census, Texas gained five seats.

Con­gress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th
48th (1883–1885) Charles
Stewart

(D)
John H.
Reagan
(D)
James H.
Jones
(D)
David B.
Culberson

(D)
James W.
Throckmorton
(D)
Olin
Wellborn
(D)
Thomas Ochiltree (I) James Francis
Miller
(D)
Roger Q. Mills (D) John Hancock (D) S. W. T.
Lanham
(D)
49th (1885–1887) William H. Crain (D) Joseph D.
Sayers
(D)
50th (1887–1889) Howdy
Martin
(D)
Constantine
B.
Kilgore
(D)
Silas Hare (D) Jo
Abbott
(D)
Littleton W.
Moore
(D)
51st (1889–1891)
52nd (1891–1893) John B. Long (D) Joseph W.
Bailey
(D)
Edwin Antony (D)

1893 to 1903: 13 seats

After the 1890 United States census, Texas gained two seats.

Congress District District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th
53rd (1893–1895) Joseph C.
Hutcheson
(D)
Samuel B.
Cooper
(D)
Constantine B.
Kilgore
(D)
David B.
Culberson
(D)
Joseph
W.
Bailey
(D)
Jo
Abbott
(D)
George C.
Pendleton
(D)
Charles K.
Bell
(D)
Joseph D.
Sayers
(D)
Walter
Gresham
(D)
William H.
Crain
(D)
Thomas M.
Paschal
(D)
Jeremiah V.
Cockrell
(D)
54th (1895–1897) C. H. Yoakum (D) Miles
Crowley
(D)
George H.
Noonan
(R)
Rudolph
Kleberg
(D)
55th (1897–1899) Thomas
H.
Ball
(D)
Reese C.
De Graffen­reid
(D)
John W. Cranford (D) Robert E.
Burke
(D)
Robert L.
Henry
(D)
S. W. T.
Lanham

(D)
Robert B.
Hawley
(R)
James Luther
Slayden
(D)
John H.
Stephens

(D)
56th (1899–1901) John L.
Sheppard
(D)
Albert S.
Burleson
(D)
57th (1901–1903) Choice B.
Randell
(D)
George F.
Burgess
(D)
Gordon J. Russell (D) Morris Sheppard (D) Dudley Wooten (D)

1903 to 1913: 16 seats

After the 1900 United States census, Texas gained three seats.

Cong­ress District District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th
58th (1903–1905) Morris
Sheppard

(D)
Samuel B.
Cooper
(D)
Gordon J.
Russell
(D)
Choice
B.
Randell

(D)
Jack
Beall

(D)
Scott
Field

(D)
Alexander
W.
Gregg
(D)
Thomas H. Ball (D) George
F.
Burgess

(D)
Albert S.
Burleson

(D)
Robert
L.
Henry

(D)
Oscar W.
Gillespie

(D)
John H.
Stephens

(D)
James
Luther
Slayden

(D)
John
Nance
Garner

(D)
William
Robert
Smith

(D)
John M. Pinckney (D)
59th (1905–1907) Moses L. Broocks (D) John M. Moore (D)
60th (1907–1909) Samuel B. Cooper (D) Rufus
Hardy

(D)
61st (1909–1911) Martin
Dies Sr.
(D)
Robert M. Lively (D)
62nd (1911–1913) James Young (D) Oscar Callaway (D)

1913 to 1933: 18 seats

After the 1910 United States census, Texas gained two seats. At first, they were elected at-large, but starting in 1919 all were districted. There was not a reapportionment after the 1920 United States census.

Cong­ress District District Cong­ress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th At-large A At-large B
63rd
(1913–1915)
Horace W.
Vaughan
(D)
Martin
Dies Sr.

(D)
James
Young

(D)
Sam
Rayburn

(D)
Jack
Beall
(D)
Rufus
Hardy

(D)
Alexander
W.
Gregg
(D)
Joe H.
Eagle

(D)
George
F.
Burgess

(D)
Buck
Buchanan

(D)
Robert
L.
Henry

(D)
Oscar
Callaway

(D)
John H.
Stephens

(D)
James
Luther
Slayden

(D)
John
Nance
Garner

(D)
William
Robert
Smith

(D)
Daniel E.
Garrett
(D)
Hatton W.
Sumners
(D)
63rd
(1913–1915)
64th
(1915–1917)
Eugene
Black

(D)
Hatton
W.
Sumners

(D)
James H.
Davis
(D)
A. Jeff
McLemore

(D)
64th
(1915–1917)
65th
(1917–1919)
Joseph
J.
Mansfield

(D)
Tom
Connally

(D)
James C.
Wilson
(D)
Marvin
Jones
(D)
Thomas L.
Blanton
(D)
Daniel E.
Garrett
(D)
65th
(1917–1919)
66th
(1919–1921)
John C.
Box
(D)
Clay
Stone
Briggs

(D)
Fritz G.
Lanham

(D)
Lucian W.
Parrish
(D)
Carlos
Bee
(D)
Claude
B.
Huds­peth

(D)
17th 18th 66th
(1919–1921)
Thomas L.
Blanton

(D)
Marvin
Jones

(D)
67th
(1921–1923)
Morgan
G.
Sanders

(D)
Daniel
E.
Garrett

(D)
Harry M.
Wurz­bach

(R)
67th
(1921–1923)
Guinn
Williams

(D)
68th
(1923–1925)
Luther
Johnson

(D)
68th
(1923–1925)
69th
(1925–1927)
69th
(1925–1927)
70th
(1927–1929)
70th
(1927–1929)
71st
(1929–1931)
Wright
Patman

(D)
Oliver
H.
Cross

(D)
Augustus
McClos­key
(D)
Robert Q.
Lee
(D)
71st
(1929–1931)
Harry M.
Wurz­bach
(R)
Thomas L.
Blanton

(D)
72nd
(1931–1933)
Martin
Dies Jr.
(D)
R. Ewing
Thomason
(D)
72nd
(1931–1933)
Joe H.
Eagle
(D)
Richard M.
Kleberg
(D)

1933 to 1953: 21 seats

After the 1930 United States census, Texas gained three seats. At first, they were elected at-large, but starting in 1935 all were districted. There was no reapportionment after the 1940 United States census.

Congress
73rd
(1933–1935)
74th
(1935–1937)
75th
(1937–1939)
76th
(1939–1941)
77th
(1941–1943)
78th
(1943–1945)
79th
(1945–1947)
80th
(1947–1949)
81st
(1949–1951)
82nd
(1951–1953)
District District Congress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th At-large A At-large B At-large C
Wright
Patman

(D)
Martin
Dies Jr.

(D)
Morgan
G.
Sanders

(D)
Sam
Rayburn

(D)
Hatton
W.
Sumners

(D)
Luther
Johnson

(D)
Clark W.
Thompson
(D)
Joe H.
Eagle

(D)
Joseph
J.
Mansfield

(D)
Buck
Buchanan

(D)
Oliver
H.
Cross

(D)
Fritz
G.
Lanham

(D)
William
D.
McFarlane

(D)
Richard
M.
Kleberg

(D)
Milton
H.
West

(D)
R. Ewing
Thomason

(D)
Thomas
L.
Blanton

(D)
Marvin
Jones

(D)
Joseph W.
Bailey Jr.
(D)
Sterling P.
Strong
(D)
George B.
Terrell
(D)
73rd
(1933–1935)
Ned
Patton

(D)
19th 20th 21st 74th
(1935–1937)
George H.
Mahon

(D)
Maury
Maverick

(D)
Charles L.
South

(D)
Albert
Thomas

(D)
William
R.
Poage

(D)
Clyde
L.
Garrett

(D)
75th
(1937–1939)
Lindley
Beckworth

(D)
Lyndon
B.
Johnson

(D)
Ed
Gossett

(D)
Paul J.
Kilday

(D)
76th
(1939–1941)
Sam
M.
Russell

(D)
Eugene
Worley

(D)
77th
(1941–1943)
O. C.
Fisher

(D)
78th
(1943–1945)
Jesse
M.
Combs

(D)
Tom
Pickett

(D)
John E.
Lyle
Jr.
(D)
79th
(1945–1947)
Joseph
Franklin
Wilson

(D)
Olin
E.
Teague

(D)
Wingate
H.
Lucas

(D)
Omar
Burleson

(D)
80th
(1947–1949)
Clark W.
Thompson

(D)
Homer
Thornberry

(D)
Lloyd
Bentsen

(D)
Kenneth
M.
Regan

(D)
Ben H.
Guill
(R)
81st
(1949–1951)
Frank N.
Ikard
(D)
Walter E.
Rogers
(D)
82nd
(1951–1953)

1953 to 1963: 22 seats

After the 1950 United States census, Texas gained one seat. At first, it was elected at-large, but starting in 1959 all were districted.

Cong­ress District District Cong­ress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st At-large
83rd
(1953–1955)
Wright Patman
(D)
Jack Brooks
(D)
Brady P. Gentry
(D)
Sam Rayburn
(D)
Joseph Franklin Wilson (D) Olin E. Teague
(D)
John Dowdy
(D)
Albert Thomas
(D)
Clark W. Thomp­son
(D)
Homer Thorn­berry
(D)
William R. Poage
(D)
Wingate H. Lucas
(D)
Frank N. Ikard
(D)
John E. Lyle Jr.
(D)
Lloyd Bentsen
(D)
Kenneth M. Regan
(D)
Omar Burleson
(D)
Walter E. Rogers
(D)
George H. Mahon
(D)
Paul J. Kilday
(D)
O. C. Fisher
(D)
Martin Dies Jr.
(D)
83rd
(1953–1955)
84th
(1955–1957)
Bruce Alger
(R)
Jim Wright
(D)
John J. Bell
(D)
Joe M. Kilgore
(D)
J. T. Ruther­ford
(D)
84th
(1955–1957)
85th
(1957–1959)
Lindley Beck­worth
(D)
John Young
(D)
85th
(1957–1959)
86th
(1959–1961)
22nd 86th
(1959–1961)
Robert R. Casey
(D)
87th
(1961–1963)
87th
(1961–1963)

1963 to 1973: 23 seats

After the 1960 United States census, Texas gained one seat. At first, it was elected at-large, but starting in 1967 all were districted.

Cong­ress District District Cong­ress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd At-large
88th
(1963–1965)
Wright Patman (D) Jack Brooks (D) Lindley Beck­worth (D) Ray Roberts (D) Bruce Alger (R) Olin E. Teague (D) John Dowdy (D) Albert Thomas (D) Clark W. Thom­pson (D) Homer Thorn­berry (D) William R. Poage (D) Jim Wright (D) Graham B. Purcell Jr. (D) John Young (D) Joe M. Kilgore (D) Ed Foreman (R) Omar Burleson (D) Walter E. Rogers (D) George H. Mahon (D) Henry B. González (D) O. C. Fisher (D) Robert R. Casey (D) Joe R. Pool (D) 88th
(1963–1965)
89th
(1965–1967)
Earle Cabell (D) Lera M. Thomas (D) J. J. Pickle (D) Kika de la Garza (D) Richard C. White (D) 89th
(1965–1967)
90th
(1967–1969)
John Dowdy (D) Joe R. Pool (D) George H. W. Bush (R) Bob Eckhardt (D) Jack Brooks (D) Bob Price (R) 23rd 90th
(1967–1969)
Chick Kazen
(D)
Jim Collins (R)
91st
(1969–1971)
91st
(1969–1971)
92nd
(1971–1973)
Bill Archer (R) 92nd
(1971–1973)

1973 to 1983: 24 seats

After the 1970 United States census, Texas gained one seat.

Cong­ress District District Cong­ress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th
93rd
(1973–1975)
Wright Patman
(D)
Charlie Wilson
(D)
Jim Collins
(R)
Ray Roberts
(D)
Alan Steel­man
(R)
Olin E. Teague
(D)
Bill Archer
(R)
Bob Eck­hardt
(D)
Jack Brooks
(D)
J. J. Pickle
(D)
William R. Poage
(D)
Jim Wright
(D)
Bob Price
(R)
John Young
(D)
Kika de la Garza
(D)
Richard Craw­ford White
(D)
Omar Burle­son
(D)
Barbara Jordan
(D)
George H. Mahon
(D)
Henry B. González
(D)
O. C. Fisher
(D)
Robert R. Casey
(D)
Chick Kazen
(D)
Dale Milford
(D)
93rd
(1973–1975)
94th
(1975–1977)
Jack High­tower
(D)
Bob Krueger
(D)
94th
(1975–1977)
Sam B. Hall Jr.
(D)
95th
(1977–1979)
Jim Mattox
(D)
Bob Gam­mage
(D)
95th
(1977–1979)
96th
(1979–1981)
Phil Gramm
(D)
Marvin Leath
(D)
Joseph Wyatt
(D)
Charles Sten­holm
(D)
Mickey Leland
(D)
Kent Hance
(D)
Tom Loeffler
(R)
Ron Paul
(R)
Martin Frost
(D)
96th
(1979–1981)
97th
(1981–1983)
Ralph Hall
(D)
Jack Fields
(R)
Bill Patman
(D)
97th
(1981–1983)

1983 to 1993: 27 seats

After the 1980 United States census, Texas gained three seats.

Congress
98th
(1983–1985)
99th
(1985–1987)
100th
(1987–1989)
101st
(1989–1991)
102nd
(1991–1993)
District District District Congress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th
Sam B.
Hall Jr.

(D)
Charlie
Wilson

(D)
Steve
Bartlett

(R)
Ralph
Hall

(D)
John
Bryant

(D)
Phil
Gramm
(R)
Bill
Archer

(R)
Jack
Fields

(R)
Jack
Brooks

(D)
J. J.
Pickle

(D)
Marvin
Leath

(D)
Jim
Wright

(D)
Jack High-
tower
(D)
Bill
Patman
(D)
Kika
de la
Garza

(D)
Ron
Coleman

(D)
Charles
Stenholm

(D)
Mickey
Leland

(D)
Kent
Hance
(D)
Henry B.
González

(D)
Tom
Loeffler

(R)
Ron
Paul
(R)
Chick
Kazen
(D)
Martin
Frost

(D)
Michael
A.
Andrews

(D)
Tom Vander-
griff
(D)
Solomon
Ortiz

(D)
98th
(1983–1985)
Joe
Barton

(R)
Beau
Boulter

(R)
Mac
Sweeney

(R)
Larry
Combest

(R)
Tom
DeLay

(R)
Albert
Bustamante

(D)
Dick
Armey

(R)
99th
(1985–1987)
Jim
Chapman

(D)
Lamar
Smith

(R)
100th
(1987–1989)
Bill
Sarpalius

(D)
Greg
Laughlin

(D)
101st
(1989–1991)
Pete
Geren

(D)
Craig
Washington

(D)
Chet
Edwards

(D)
102nd
(1991–1993)
Sam
Johnson
(R)

1993 to 2003: 30 seats

After the 1990 United States census, Texas gained three seats.

Congress
103rd
(1993–1995)
104th
(1995–1997)
105th
(1997–1999)
106th
(1999–2001)
107th
(2001–2003)
District District District Congress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th
Jim
Chapman

(D)
Charlie
Wilson

(D)
Sam
Johnson

(R)
Ralph
Hall

(D)
John
Bryant

(D)
Joe
Barton

(R)
Bill
Archer

(R)
Jack
Fields

(R)
Jack
Brooks
(D)
J. J.
Pickle
(D)
Chet
Edwards

(D)
Pete
Geren

(D)
Bill Sar-
palius
(D)
Greg
Laughlin
(D)
Kika de
la Garza

(D)
Ron
Coleman

(D)
Charles
Stenholm

(D)
Craig Wash-
ington
(D)
Larry
Combest

(R)
Henry B.
González

(D)
Lamar
Smith

(R)
Tom
DeLay

(R)
Henry
Bonilla

(R)
Martin
Frost

(D)
Michael A.
Andrews
(D)
Dick
Armey

(R)
Solomon
Ortiz

(D)
Frank
Tejeda

(D)
Gene
Green

(D)
Eddie
Bernice
Johnson

(D)
103rd
(1993–1995)
Steve
Stockman
(R)
Lloyd
Doggett

(D)
Mac
Thornberry

(R)
Greg
Laughlin
(R)
Sheila
Jackson
Lee

(D)
Ken
Bentsen

(D)
104th
(1995–1997)
Max
Sandlin

(D)
Jim
Turner

(D)
Pete
Sessions

(R)
Kevin
Brady

(R)
Nick
Lampson

(D)
Kay
Granger

(R)
Ron
Paul

(R)
Rubén
Hinojosa

(D)
Silver
Reyes

(D)
105th
(1997–1999)
Charlie
Gonzalez

(D)
Ciro
Rodriguez

(D)
106th
(1999–2001)
John Cul-
berson
(R)
107th
(2001–2003)

2003 to 2013: 32 seats

After the 2000 United States census, Texas gained two seats.

As typical, the delegation was redistricted for the 2002 elections. They were also redistricted in 2003, which gave Republicans a majority of seats after the 2004 elections.

Congress
108th
(2003–2005)
109th
(2005–2007)
110th
(2007–2009)
111th
(2009–2011)
112th
(2011–2013)
District District District District Congress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32nd
Max
Sandlin

(D)
Jim
Turner

(D)
Sam
Johnson

(R)
Ralph
Hall
(D)
Jeb
Hensarling

(R)
Joe
Barton

(R)
John
Culberson

(R)
Kevin
Brady

(R)
Nick
Lampson

(D)
Lloyd
Doggett

(D)
Chet
Edwards

(D)
Kay
Granger

(R)
Mac
Thornberry

(R)
Ron
Paul

(R)
Rubén
Hinojosa

(D)
Silver
Reyes

(D)
Charles
Stenholm

(D)
Sheila
Jackson
Lee

(D)
Larry
Combest
(R)
Charlie
Gonzalez

(D)
Lamar
Smith

(R)
Tom
DeLay

(R)
Henry
Bonilla

(R)
Martin
Frost

(D)
Chris Bell
(D)
Michael
C.
Burgess

(R)
Solomon
Ortiz

(D)
Ciro
Rodriguez

(D)
Gene
Green

(D)
Eddie
Bernice
Johnson

(D)
John
Carter

(R)
Pete
Sessions

(R)
108th
(2003–2005)
Randy
Neugebauer

(R)
Louie
Gohmert

(R)
Ted
Poe

(R)
Ralph
Hall
(R)
Al
Green

(D)
Michael
McCaul

(R)
Mike
Conaway

(R)
Chet
Edwards

(D)
Kenny
Marchant

(R)
Lloyd
Doggett

(D)
Henry
Cuellar

(D)
109th
(2005–2007)
Shelley Sekula-
Gibbs
(R)
Nick
Lampson
(D)
Ciro
Rodriguez

(D)
110th
(2007–2009)
Pete
Olson

(R)
111th
(2009–2011)
Bill
Flores
(R)
Quico
Canseco
(R)
Blake Farent-
hold
(R)
112th
(2011–2013)

2013 to 2023: 36 seats

After the 2010 United States census, Texas gained four seats.

Congress
113th
(2013–2015)
114th
(2015–2017)
115th
(2017–2019)
116th
(2019–2021)
117th
(2021–2023)
District District District District Congress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32nd 33rd 34th 35th 36th
Louie
Gohmert

(R)
Ted
Poe

(R)
Sam
Johnson

(R)
Ralph
Hall
(R)
Jeb
Hensarling

(R)
Joe
Barton

(R)
John
Culberson

(R)
Kevin
Brady

(R)
Al
Green

(D)
Michael
McCaul

(R)
Mike
Conaway

(R)
Kay
Granger

(R)
Mac
Thornberry

(R)
Randy
Weber

(R)
Rubén
Hinojosa

(D)
Beto
O'Rourke

(D)
Bill
Flores

(R)
Sheila
Jackson
Lee

(D)
Randy
Neugebauer

(R)
Joaquin
Castro

(D)
Lamar
Smith

(R)
Pete
Olson

(R)
Pete
Gallego
(D)
Kenny
Marchant

(R)
Roger
Williams

(R)
Michael C.
Burgess

(R)
Blake
Farenthold

(R)
Henry
Cuellar

(D)
Gene
Green

(D)
Eddie
Bernice
Johnson

(D)
John
Carter

(R)
Pete
Sessions

(R)
Marc
Veasey

(D)
Filemon
Vela Jr.

(D)
Lloyd
Doggett

(D)
Steve
Stockman
(R)
113th
(2013–2015)
John
Ratcliffe

(R)
Will
Hurd

(R)
Brian
Babin

(R)
114th
(2015–2017)
Vicente
Gonzalez

(D)
Jodey
Arrington

(R)
115th
(2017–2019)
Michael
Cloud
(R)
Dan
Crenshaw

(R)
Van
Taylor

(R)
Lance
Gooden

(R)
Ron
Wright

(R)
Lizzie
Fletcher

(D)
Veronica
Escobar

(D)
Chip
Roy

(R)
Sylvia
Garcia

(D)
Colin
Allred

(D)
116th
(2019–2021)
vacant
Pat
Fallon

(R)
August
Pfluger

(R)
Ronny
Jackson

(R)
Pete
Sessions

(R)
Troy
Nehls

(R)
Tony
Gonzales

(R)
Beth Van
Duyne

(R)
117th
(2021–2023)
Jake
Ellzey
(R)
Mayra
Flores
(R)

2023 to present: 38 seats

After the 2020 United States census, Texas gained two seats.

Congress
118th
(2023–2025)
District District District District Congress
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32nd 33rd 34th 35th 36th 37th 38th
Nathaniel
Moran

(R)
Dan
Crenshaw

(R)
Keith
Self

(R)
Pat
Fallon

(R)
Lance
Gooden

(R)
Jake
Ellzey

(R)
Lizzie
Fletcher

(D)
Morgan
Luttrell

(R)
Al
Green

(D)
Michael
McCaul

(R)
August
Pfluger

(R)
Kay
Granger

(R)
Ronny
Jackson

(R)
Randy
Weber

(R)
Monica
De La Cruz

(R)
Veronica
Escobar

(D)
Pete
Sessions

(R)
Sheila
Jackson
Lee
(D)
Jodey
Arrington

(R)
Joaquin
Castro

(D)
Chip
Roy

(R)
Troy
Nehls

(R)
Tony
Gonzales

(R)
Beth
Van Duyne

(R)
Roger
Williams

(R)
Michael C.
Burgess

(R)
Michael
Cloud

(R)
Henry
Cuellar

(D)
Sylvia
Garcia

(D)
Jasmine
Crockett

(D)
John
Carter

(R)
Collin
Allred

(D)
Marc
Veasey

(D)
Vicente
Gonzalez

(D)
Greg
Casar

(D)
Brian
Babin

(R)
Lloyd
Doggett

(D)
Wesley
Hunt

(R)
118th
(2023–2025)

U.S. Senate

Main article: List of United States senators from Texas

Current U.S. senators from Texas
Texas

CPVI (2022):[7]
R+5
Class I senator Class II senator

Ted Cruz
(Junior senator)
(Houston)

John Cornyn
(Senior senator)
(Austin)
Party Republican Republican
Incumbent since January 3, 2013 December 2, 2002

Key

Democratic (D)
Greenback (GB)
Independent Democrat (ID)
Know Nothing (KN)
Liberal Republican (LR)
Republican (R)
Independent (I)

See also

References

  1. ^ "What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State". FiveThirtyEight. October 14, 2021. Retrieved October 14, 2021.
  2. ^ "Analysis: Gerrymandering has left Texas voters with few options". 20 April 2022.
  3. ^ "Texas May Have the Worst Gerrymander in the Country". 28 February 2022.
  4. ^ "Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives". clerk.house.gov. Retrieved 2022-01-13.
  5. ^ "2022 Cook PVI: District Map and List". Cook Political Report. 15 April 2021. Retrieved 2023-01-03.
  6. ^ "Digital Boundary Definitions of United States Congressional Districts, 1789–2012". Retrieved October 18, 2014.
  7. ^ "2022 Cook PVI: State Map and List". Cook Political Report. 12 July 2022. Retrieved 2023-01-07.