The University of Tennessee College of Law
Parent schoolUniversity of Tennessee
Established1890
School typePublic
Parent endowment$1.072 billion (2014) [1]
DeanDoug Blaze (interim)
LocationKnoxville, Tennessee, United States
35°57′30″N 83°55′46″W / 35.9582°N 83.9294°W / 35.9582; -83.9294Coordinates: 35°57′30″N 83°55′46″W / 35.9582°N 83.9294°W / 35.9582; -83.9294
Enrollment460
Faculty43
USNWR ranking60 (2022)[2]
Websitewww.law.utk.edu
ABA profileUT ABA profile

The University of Tennessee College of Law is the law school of the University of Tennessee located in Knoxville, Tennessee. Founded in 1890, the College of Law is fully accredited by the American Bar Association and is a charter member of the Association of American Law Schools.

Curriculum and facilities

The University of Tennessee College of Law curriculum includes the Juris Doctor (J.D.) which offers academic concentrations in two areas, Advocacy and Dispute Resolution[3] and Business Transactions.[4]

The College of Law also offers dual degree programs in law and business, law and philosophy, law and public health, and law and public administration.

The Haslam College of Business and the College of Law offer a credit-sharing program leading to the conferral of both the Doctor of Jurisprudence and the Master of Business Administration degrees.[5]

The Department of Philosophy in the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Law offer a credit-sharing program leading to the conferral of both the Master of Arts in Philosophy and the Doctor of Jurisprudence degrees.[6]

The Department of Public Health in the College of Education, Health & Human Sciences and the College of Law offer a credit-sharing program leading to the conferral of both the Master of Public Health and the Doctor of Jurisprudence degrees.[7]

The Department of Political Science in the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Law offer a credit-sharing program leading to the conferral of both the Master of Public Administration and the Doctor of Jurisprudence degrees.[8]

Library

The 110,000-square-foot George C. Taylor Law Center completed in 1997 is located on Cumberland Avenue, four blocks from downtown Knoxville.

Clinical programs

The College of Law's Advocacy Clinic is the longest continuously operating for-credit clinic in the country. In 2017, U.S. News & World Report ranked Tennessee's clinical programs 10th nationally among public institutions' clinical programs.

Statistics

Admissions

For the 2019 entering class, the College of Law had 1.042 applications, 358 were admitted out of which 126 matriculated. The median LSAT score was 159, and the median GPA was 3.65. The 75% to 25% ranges for LSAT and GPA were 161 to 156 and 3.85 to 3.32.[9]

Post-graduation employment

According to the College of Law's official 2019 ABA-required disclosures, 99 of 106 graduates of the class of 2018 obtained full-time, long-term, bar passage-required employment nine months after graduation.[10]

Costs

The total cost of attendance (indicating the cost of tuition, fees, and living expenses) at the College of Law for the 2019-2020 academic year is $40,660 for Tennessee residents and $59,334 for non-residents.[11]

The Law School Transparency estimated debt-financed cost of attendance for three years is $146,655.[12]

Notable alumni

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-02-23. Retrieved 2017-02-09.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ "Center for Advocacy and Dispute Resolution".
  4. ^ "Clayton Center for Entrepreneurial Law".
  5. ^ "JD + MBA Details". Retrieved 2015-09-15.
  6. ^ "JD + MA Details". Retrieved 2015-09-15.
  7. ^ "JD + MPH Details". Retrieved 2015-09-15.
  8. ^ "JD + MPPA Details". Retrieved 2015-09-15.
  9. ^ "The University of Tennessee College of Law Standard 509" (PDF). Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  10. ^ "Section of Legal Education, Employment Summary Report". American Bar Association. Retrieved 21 February 2018.
  11. ^ "Tuition and Fees". University of Tennessee College of Law. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  12. ^ "University of Tennessee Profile, Cost". Law School Transparency. Retrieved 20 July 2014.
  13. ^ U.S. Embassy in Warsaw
  14. ^ Hunt, Albert R. (1 July 2014). "Howard Baker, Senate prince showed great statesmanship". The Olympian. Retrieved 5 July 2014.
  15. ^ Grier, Peter. The Christian Science Monitor (2014). Howard Baker: the real story of his famous Watergate question. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  16. ^ Board of Trustees of the Fraternity of Phi Gamma Delta (January 17, 1920). The Phi Gamma Delta 45. Knoxville Sentinel. p. 612. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  17. ^ United States Marine Corps History Division. "General Clifton B Cates, USMC (Deceased)" Archived 2015-09-22 at the Wayback Machine. Who's Who. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  18. ^ Harwood, Richard (1994). A Close Encounter: The Marine Landing on Tinian. Marines in World War II Commemorative Series. Transcribed and formatted by Jerry Holden for the HyperWar Foundation. Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC: Marine Corps Historical Center. p. 5.
  19. ^ Alexander, Col. Joseph H., UMC (Ret) (1994). "The Assault Commanders at Iwo Jima". Closing In: Marines in the Seizure of Iwo Jima. Marines in World War II Commemorative Series. Transcribed and formatted by Emily Brickhouse for the HyperWar Foundation. Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC: Marine Corps Historical Center. p. 10.
  20. ^ Flowers, Mark (2004). "The Dress Blue Uniform Image Gallery". World War II Gyrene. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  21. ^ Billboard Power 100: Joel Katz. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  22. ^ "Biographical Sketch of Harold C. Walchow," Wisconsin Blue Book 1931, p. 214.
  23. ^ James O'Toole (December 12, 2011). "Constitutional convention call gains traction". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 2011-12-14.
  24. ^ "Bob Rochelle's Biography PrintTrack This Politician". Votesmart.org. Project Vote Smart. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  25. ^ U.S. Dep’t of State: Biography of Ronald L. Schlicher
  26. ^ Tennessee Traditions