The vigintisexviri (sg. vigintisexvir; lit.'twenty-six men') were a college (collegium) of minor magistrates (magistratus minores) in the Roman Republic. The college consisted of six boards:[1]

Being a member of the vigintisexviri was a prerequisite to the quaestorship after the reforms of Sulla.[5] The label used for these magistrates may only have been introduced after Sullan times, but the first of the constituent boards may date back to the third century BC.[1]

The duoviri viis extra urbem purgandis and the four praefecti Capuam Cumas were abolished by Augustus c. 13 BC, reducing the vigintisexviri to the vigintiviri.[1] In AD 13, the senate restricted eligibility, ordaining that only equites should be eligible to the college of the then-vigintiviri.[6] The remaining boards were not abolished entirely until at least the third century.[1]

References

Citations

Sources

  • Brennan, T Corey (2012). "cursus honorum". In Hornblower, Simon; Spawforth, Antony; Eidinow, Esther (eds.). The Oxford classical dictionary (4th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 400. doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780199381135.013.1965. ISBN 978-0-19-954556-8. OCLC 959667246.
  • Drummond, A (2012). "decemviri stlitibus iudicandis". In Hornblower, Simon; Spawforth, Antony; Eidinow, Esther (eds.). The Oxford classical dictionary (4th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 400. doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780199381135.013.2051. ISBN 978-0-19-954556-8. OCLC 959667246.
  • Melville-Jones, John R. (1990). A dictionary of ancient Roman coins. London: Seaby. ISBN 1-85264-026-X. OCLC 25283897.
  • Hornblower, Simon; Spawforth, Antony, eds. (1996). The Oxford classical dictionary (3rd ed.). Oxford. ISBN 0-19-866172-X. OCLC 34284310.
  • Purcell, N (2012). "vigintisexviri, vigintiviri". In Hornblower, Simon; Spawforth, Antony; Eidinow, Esther (eds.). The Oxford classical dictionary (4th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 1551. doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780199381135.013.6807. ISBN 978-0-19-954556-8. OCLC 959667246.
  • Smith, William, ed. (1875). "vigintisexviri". A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities. London: John Murray. p. 983. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.